GSXS-F for touring - Page 4 - Suzuki GSXS1000 Forum
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post #31 of 60 Old 07-02-2019, 04:05 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by gixxerjasen View Post
A lot will come down to setup. If your FJR wasn't a picnic on long rides I'd probably point to setup on that, and if you don't set up the GSX-S1000 for you, it might not do the job well either. Aftermarket seat and handlebar relocator changed my FJR dramatically and fixed the issues I had with it. You might need some mods for the GSX-S but I think it can do the job well.
I should probably clarify, the biggest problem I had was with buffeting. It's just a matter of physics, the only way I could get it to completely go away was cutting the stock screen in half, but my then you have so little protection left you remove one of the biggest advantages of a big touring bike.

I tried everything on that bike, I just didn't fit well on it. The pegs are also too high but if you add a lowering kit you lose too much ground clearance. The trade-off didn't' seems worth it to carry around all that extra weight. I was no more tired on my 919 the last trip I took.
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post #32 of 60 Old 07-02-2019, 09:56 PM
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I should probably clarify, the biggest problem I had was with buffeting. It's just a matter of physics, the only way I could get it to completely go away was cutting the stock screen in half, but my then you have so little protection left you remove one of the biggest advantages of a big touring bike.

I tried everything on that bike, I just didn't fit well on it. The pegs are also too high but if you add a lowering kit you lose too much ground clearance. The trade-off didn't' seems worth it to carry around all that extra weight. I was no more tired on my 919 the last trip I took.
I fought buffeting on my V-Strom and finally decided that if I can get a good clean helmet and protection from neck down, that worked best for me. That's exactly the way my F works. I have a GT-Air and it is reasonably quite and clean in the air. I can head check at 80+ without getting my head snapped off, and I get a nice clear view of the road ahead.
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post #33 of 60 Old 07-03-2019, 08:45 AM
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Wow that bike is loaded !
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post #34 of 60 Old 07-04-2019, 10:58 AM
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I'm glad you got the GSX-S and I'm glad you are aware that EVERY bike is a compromise in one way or another. A MotoGP bike would be awesome on the track, but pretty much s-u-c-k everywhere else. A Gold Wing is just the thing for killing interstate miles, but is a tub-o-lard in the tight corners. The thing is, so much comes down to what you've ridden before and what your expectations and experiences are for a long distant ride.


I've had an FJR1300 and a CBR929RR and 'toured' on both of them. As you put it, the FJR1300 was 'competent and good' but it was boring. When I really tried to be a hooligan with it in the corners, it fought me (681 pounds of weight has that effect). The CBR929RR had a chain to upkeep, a small (4.8 gallon) fuel tank, but with the right mods (Corbin seat, heli-bars, lower footpegs, WP shock, Ventura bags, 1kg springs up front, Scottoiler) it was comfortable enough but so much more fun when the road got curvy. And I could outrun most anything else out there, so that was fun, too!


But as Jorider61 put it, I'm not that 'young' guy anymore. Hence the move to the GSX-S1000. Better ergos 'out of the box'. ABS. Traction control. 140hp at the rear-wheel. But it has weaknesses as a long distant mount: geared a bit 'low' for freeway droning (go 18 tooth up front), chain to maintain (get a Scottoiler!) Stock seat is too soft for all but the youngest and lightest (Corbin makes a good replacement.) Gas tank only holds 4.5 gallons of fuel (uh...nothing you can do about this, but that 18T up front should help a bit with gas mileage.) Rear shock is a complete disaster (your first modification, right there! Wilbers or K-Tech are your friends.) Windscreens are notoriously "personal"; what I like you will hate. (I cut them down until the wind blast is at my upper chest so my head is in 'clean', non-turbulent air which is QUIETER and that works for me.)



You can make the GSX-S1000 work the way YOU want, but it won't be perfect in all areas and for all riding. Just accept that. Fix the things that bother you the most and learn to not fixate and be unhappy with the things that could be better, but you can't really do anything about. (As a matter of fact, that advice applies to most of life in general...)
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post #35 of 60 Old 07-04-2019, 03:06 PM Thread Starter
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I'm glad you got the GSX-S and I'm glad you are aware that EVERY bike is a compromise in one way or another. A MotoGP bike would be awesome on the track, but pretty much s-u-c-k everywhere else. A Gold Wing is just the thing for killing interstate miles, but is a tub-o-lard in the tight corners. The thing is, so much comes down to what you've ridden before and what your expectations and experiences are for a long distant ride.


I've had an FJR1300 and a CBR929RR and 'toured' on both of them. As you put it, the FJR1300 was 'competent and good' but it was boring. When I really tried to be a hooligan with it in the corners, it fought me (681 pounds of weight has that effect). The CBR929RR had a chain to upkeep, a small (4.8 gallon) fuel tank, but with the right mods (Corbin seat, heli-bars, lower footpegs, WP shock, Ventura bags, 1kg springs up front, Scottoiler) it was comfortable enough but so much more fun when the road got curvy. And I could outrun most anything else out there, so that was fun, too!


But as Jorider61 put it, I'm not that 'young' guy anymore. Hence the move to the GSX-S1000. Better ergos 'out of the box'. ABS. Traction control. 140hp at the rear-wheel. But it has weaknesses as a long distant mount: geared a bit 'low' for freeway droning (go 18 tooth up front), chain to maintain (get a Scottoiler!) Stock seat is too soft for all but the youngest and lightest (Corbin makes a good replacement.) Gas tank only holds 4.5 gallons of fuel (uh...nothing you can do about this, but that 18T up front should help a bit with gas mileage.) Rear shock is a complete disaster (your first modification, right there! Wilbers or K-Tech are your friends.) Windscreens are notoriously "personal"; what I like you will hate. (I cut them down until the wind blast is at my upper chest so my head is in 'clean', non-turbulent air which is QUIETER and that works for me.)



You can make the GSX-S1000 work the way YOU want, but it won't be perfect in all areas and for all riding. Just accept that. Fix the things that bother you the most and learn to not fixate and be unhappy with the things that could be better, but you can't really do anything about. (As a matter of fact, that advice applies to most of life in general...)
Very insightful. I could write ten pages on the bikes I've owned and sold because they weren't "perfect" for what ever ungodly reason I could come up with just to toss them up on craigslist. I lose insane amounts of money in the process because I get anxious and give them away with thousands worth of mods installed.

My new GSXS will be my 36th bike, and I've only had a couple of them for more than a year. For the ones I've truly enjoyed, the common denominator seems to be the ones that handle. I seem to bond with ones flick over on their sides and stick to the road like glue.

So after recently owning a FJR, ST13, ZX14R, VFR1200 and Bandit 1250, my logic is to dump all that extra weight I have no need for and the handling of the GSXS will make me love it so much I won't care about the compromises I have to make for highway cruising.

If I could tour on the same bike I can have fun on the track with, that's as close to perfect as I can think of.
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post #36 of 60 Old 07-04-2019, 03:43 PM
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Hey Ditch,
36th bike? Wow. That's some bike ownership history there. Someday I should probably calculate how many I've owned. It will be less than 36, I'm sure. But you do learn something from every bike you own. You also learn things about bikes depending on where you live. For example, after 3 years living in Biloxi, Mississippi, I wanted all the airflow I could get. It was hot and humid there. And tires heated up fast, so I could get nice track tires to work there that didn't work for people living where it was cold/colder. Then there was Colorado where I lived at 7,000 feet and could ride above 14,000 feet during the summer (Pikes Peak and Mt Evans.) There I learned that a bike that had 'good' power elsewhere did not have enough power at altitude. I also learned that wind protection was crucial because it got brutally cold at times when the sun got behind the mountains. Brrr! Also, I would get better gas mileage there then I would at lower altitude. Then there was western Washington, where it was WET all the dang time. Doing a fender-ectomy was a bad idea in that location. You'd be drenched from the water coming off that rear tire. And you wanted tires with lots of silica in them for the wet weather traction.


Bikes and locations all matter. But you hit the key thing I've "learned" over the years - LIGHT IS RIGHT. Light is fun. Light is enjoyable. The fatter and heavier a bike, the less I 'loved' it. The lighter a bike, the more fun it seemed to be. That's why dirt bikes are such a kick in the pants - they weigh 240lbs (give or take) so they can be tossed around, picked up when they fall over, and feel 'quick' even if they aren't going that fast. In the street bike world, the closest we get to 'light' are sportbikes. The CBR929RR weighed 438 pounds, full of fuel, yet put out 128 rwhp, giving it a great power to weight ratio. The GSX-S1000 is the same, weighing 460 pounds but with 140 rwhp, so nearly the same power to weight ratio.


You are coming off some FAT bikes (VFR1200, FJR1300, ST1300, ZX14R, 1250 Bandit) so the GSX-S1000 is going to feel very light and nimble in comparison. But it will be frustrating at first because the rear shock really holds it back and throws off the handling. Replace THAT, and you are now riding a bike that can handle the corners and bumps while having the power to take off like a scalded cat when you want. (You'll be happy when the OEM Dunlop D204 tires wear out, as they are not that grippy. The bike really likes a new pair of 'shoes' to show it's stuff. But the 204s will be okay for break-in miles and getting a feel for the bike; thankfully, they wear out quickly, which in this case is a positive as you can put GOOD rubber on there sooner.)


Maybe you'll do a bunch of mods to the bike and decide in a year or two it isn't for you. It happens. But I think it will provide you a lot of miles of smiles in the interim. It's a really good bike for the money. Biggest weaknesses are rear shock and stock tires. Easily fixed.
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post #37 of 60 Old 07-04-2019, 03:57 PM Thread Starter
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^ I also saw you had plans for a scottoiler, did you ever mount one and if so how?
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post #38 of 60 Old 07-04-2019, 05:03 PM
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I haven't put it on the GSX-S1000 yet. Just lazy. I've had it on CBR929, FZ-1, CBR954, DL-650, DL-1000, and probably a bike (or two?) I'm forgetting. Dang, as I write that, I realize I've had this Scottoiler for a long time now and it has 'lubed' the chains on a lot of bikes for many(!) miles. I've certainly gotten my money's worth out of it.


The reservoir will be attached to the passenger peg with zip ties and some 'rubber' to protect it from damage (rubbing against aluminum.) The feed line will be zip tied to the swingarm (per normal) with the tip right at the sprocket/chain junction (pointed at outer links side), and the 'breather' tube will go under the seat to protect it from water and dirt intrusion (learned my lesson the hard way on that!) Then I'll get a 'T' connector and tap into one of the vacuum lines going to one of the cylinder intakes under the tank. It's not "hard", it's just time consuming to route it all and get it hooked up so it doesn't look ghetto. I'll try to remember to post pics once I get it hooked up.


I guess they have a newer version that runs off electricity instead of vacuum, which would be nice.
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post #39 of 60 Old 07-04-2019, 07:01 PM Thread Starter
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The vacuum line was all I'm worried about, want to make sure I tap the right one.
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post #40 of 60 Old 07-05-2019, 11:16 AM
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I just counted - I've had 16 motorcycles since 1987 when I got my first street bike. It feels like a lot of different machines, but you are on your 36th different motorcycle, so apparently I'm the model of restraint! Just wait until I update the wife that "I could be worse!" That will go over great, I'm sure ;o)


Tapping vacuum line - on the throttle body there will be a vacuum line going to each cylinder; pick one, cut it, put the 'T' adapter in there and plug in your Scottoiler. No worries. Not sure I'd tap in anywhere else. You need a line that is constantly pulling a vacuum and those going to the intake manifold/cylinders are 'foolproof' and won't negatively affect the bike's running in any way.
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