Front Suspension - Suzuki GSXS1000 Forum
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post #1 of 62 Old 08-26-2017, 08:39 PM Thread Starter
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Front Suspension

Has anyone had the GSX-S1000's front fork dampening revalved, or replaced the front forks altogether? I replaced the rear shock and it helped immensely on the rear, but now the front forks feel like they have way too much compression dampening whenever going over roads with a very irregular (bumpy) surface. It seems as though the forks momentarily hydraulic lock. I grit my teeth and tense up knowing I'm about to get hammered through the bars.

I road a 2017 Tuono Factory with Ohlins suspension about a month ago and the difference in ability and level of confidence to tackle rough roads is unreal between that bike and the GSX-S1000. The Aprilia felt wholly composed, the suspension soaked up the bumps almost as though they weren't there. I have ridden the GSX-S1000 through the same section of road on which I tested the Aprilia, but it is nowhere near as confidence inspiring as the Aprilia. The Aprilia's suspension floated over the bumps and the bike felt like it was glued to the road surface.

So fellow GSX-S1000 riders how did you improve the front fork performance on your bike?

Cheers
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post #2 of 62 Old 08-26-2017, 10:57 PM
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I actually find my bike quite compliant. I have left it standard but have adjusted for my riding weight and style the correct sag figures, and then fine tune adjusted my compression and rebound accordingly.
��I think comparing to another bike or suspension is unfair. Perhaps a better comparison would be a Suzuki GSXS 1000 with Ohlins forks (and properly set up for you) would be a better comparison. However when you start comparing stock suspension that Suzuki has on this bike to full blown Ohlins well it's like comparing chalk and cheese - unfair. Of course you get what you pay for.
Just my view
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post #3 of 62 Old 08-27-2017, 01:28 AM
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Thumbs up Trade it in pay 5k more and get the Tuono

Quote:
Originally Posted by bruba12606 View Post
Has anyone had the GSX-S1000's front fork dampening revalved, or replaced the front forks altogether? I replaced the rear shock and it helped immensely on the rear, but now the front forks feel like they have way too much compression dampening whenever going over roads with a very irregular (bumpy) surface. It seems as though the forks momentarily hydraulic lock. I grit my teeth and tense up knowing I'm about to get hammered through the bars.

I road a 2017 Tuono Factory with Ohlins suspension about a month ago and the difference in ability and level of confidence to tackle rough roads is unreal between that bike and the GSX-S1000. The Aprilia felt wholly composed, the suspension soaked up the bumps almost as though they weren't there. I have ridden the GSX-S1000 through the same section of road on which I tested the Aprilia, but it is nowhere near as confidence inspiring as the Aprilia. The Aprilia's suspension floated over the bumps and the bike felt like it was glued to the road surface.

So fellow GSX-S1000 riders how did you improve the front fork performance on your bike?

Cheers
We get different bikes for different reasons (all bikes are good).

Instead of spending money upgrading this one, why not get the Tuono?
I agree......................bad ass bike, accidentally came out of a corner in a power wheelie a couple of years ago and it stayed in perfect line (not a care in the world)
Try the RSV4 much more comfy seat.

Just remember that there aren't that many real qualified mechanics to take care of all the little problems that they have & need a lot more TLC vs. Suzuki.
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post #4 of 62 Old 08-27-2017, 03:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bruba12606 View Post
Has anyone had the GSX-S1000's front fork dampening revalved, or replaced the front forks altogether? I replaced the rear shock and it helped immensely on the rear, but now the front forks feel like they have way too much compression dampening whenever going over roads with a very irregular (bumpy) surface. It seems as though the forks momentarily hydraulic lock. I grit my teeth and tense up knowing I'm about to get hammered through the bars.

I road a 2017 Tuono Factory with Ohlins suspension about a month ago and the difference in ability and level of confidence to tackle rough roads is unreal between that bike and the GSX-S1000. The Aprilia felt wholly composed, the suspension soaked up the bumps almost as though they weren't there. I have ridden the GSX-S1000 through the same section of road on which I tested the Aprilia, but it is nowhere near as confidence inspiring as the Aprilia. The Aprilia's suspension floated over the bumps and the bike felt like it was glued to the road surface.

So fellow GSX-S1000 riders how did you improve the front fork performance on your bike?

Cheers
You don't say how you've set the front rebound and compression damping. Do you still get a harsh ride if your wind both adjusters right out? Slow rebound damping will give a new identical harsh ride to excessive compression damping on bad roads. Overweight springs for the riders weight/riding conditions similarly.

The only way I've ever been able to set compression damping is to first take both compression and rebound completely out of the equation by backing both right off. Then bring rebound up till you get the ride you want on rough roads, and only then bring up compression damping. By setting rebound correctly first you know any harshness as you increase compression damping is in fact due to that adjustment alone.

P.S. another advantage of screwing the front right back on both compression and rebound is to make sure the harshness is actually coming from the front. Don't know about other people but I have difficult tell which end is causing a harsh ride. For that reason I make sure the rear is set how I want it prior to bringing up front adjustments.
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Last edited by JohnCW; 08-27-2017 at 03:24 AM.
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post #5 of 62 Old 08-27-2017, 09:43 AM
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As you said in your post, by replacing the rear shock things got better back there. I bet the new shock is set up for your weight. I think the GSX-s1000 is a great bike to start with but some of the value savings suzuki applied is in the suspension....with that said its all about home much your willing to spend.

1. New springs for your weight...$150 to $200...This makes a significant difference if you weigh over 200lb. Stock springs are OK not great and like most japanese bikes not good for heavier rider. I'm 190ib in gear. I replaced rear shock and love it but find the front performs great for my weight...good dampening and no dive.

2. New springs + racetech gold valves $300-$400. Add install cost if your not doing yourself. Will make a big difference, especially on dampening for almost any rider weight.

3. Cartridge inserts. about $1000 to $1200. add install cost if not doing yourself. Track level stuff. You can usually find $500 cartridge upgrade kits after a while from addreanni or hyperpro but I havent seen any yet.

4. Racetech or wilbers or ohlins custum forks. $3000 to $4000. Race level.

I agree with what john said above.....Properly setting up makes a big difference also. I've helped sever friends with this with their bikes and they are usually surprised how much better the oem stuff was performing after...(not implying yours is not...just stressing the significance)

Im not sure I agree with just buying a tuonno (Its a great bike)...I just think the suzuki is also a great bike, has a feel that is unique from the tuono and some might prefer it. You can arguably make the suspension on this bike superior to a tuono and still come in much cheaper. $9000 for bike +$4000 for completely custom front and rear.
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post #6 of 62 Old 08-27-2017, 03:04 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcm View Post
We get different bikes for different reasons (all bikes are good).

Instead of spending money upgrading this one, why not get the Tuono?
I agree......................bad ass bike, accidentally came out of a corner in a power wheelie a couple of years ago and it stayed in perfect line (not a care in the world)
Try the RSV4 much more comfy seat.

Just remember that there aren't that many real qualified mechanics to take care of all the little problems that they have & need a lot more TLC vs. Suzuki.
Thanks. I plan to buy a 2017 Tuono Factory next year about this time, but I also plan to keep the Suzuki. I would just like the forks on the Suzuki to work better on the roads I regularly ride. BTW, I have a local dealer who carries Aprilia, and they seem to be competent.
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post #7 of 62 Old 08-27-2017, 03:11 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by JohnCW View Post
You don't say how you've set the front rebound and compression damping. Do you still get a harsh ride if your wind both adjusters right out? Slow rebound damping will give a new identical harsh ride to excessive compression damping on bad roads. Overweight springs for the riders weight/riding conditions similarly.

The only way I've ever been able to set compression damping is to first take both compression and rebound completely out of the equation by backing both right off. Then bring rebound up till you get the ride you want on rough roads, and only then bring up compression damping. By setting rebound correctly first you know any harshness as you increase compression damping is in fact due to that adjustment alone.

P.S. another advantage of screwing the front right back on both compression and rebound is to make sure the harshness is actually coming from the front. Don't know about other people but I have difficult tell which end is causing a harsh ride. For that reason I make sure the rear is set how I want it prior to bringing up front adjustments.
Thank you for the reply/advice. I did try letting the compression out and now the forks almost bottom out on some of the more bumpy roads on which I ride, yet they are still harsh on bumps that affect high speed compression. I weigh 195 lbs with all my riding gear. I think I'll take the bike to a local suspension "guru" and let them adjust the front forks and see if they can work any magic on them.
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post #8 of 62 Old 08-27-2017, 03:17 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by dqban View Post
As you said in your post, by replacing the rear shock things got better back there. I bet the new shock is set up for your weight. I think the GSX-s1000 is a great bike to start with but some of the value savings suzuki applied is in the suspension....with that said its all about home much your willing to spend.

1. New springs for your weight...$150 to $200...This makes a significant difference if you weigh over 200lb. Stock springs are OK not great and like most japanese bikes not good for heavier rider. I'm 190ib in gear. I replaced rear shock and love it but find the front performs great for my weight...good dampening and no dive.

2. New springs + racetech gold valves $300-$400. Add install cost if your not doing yourself. Will make a big difference, especially on dampening for almost any rider weight.

3. Cartridge inserts. about $1000 to $1200. add install cost if not doing yourself. Track level stuff. You can usually find $500 cartridge upgrade kits after a while from addreanni or hyperpro but I havent seen any yet.

4. Racetech or wilbers or ohlins custum forks. $3000 to $4000. Race level.

I agree with what john said above.....Properly setting up makes a big difference also. I've helped sever friends with this with their bikes and they are usually surprised how much better the oem stuff was performing after...(not implying yours is not...just stressing the significance)

Im not sure I agree with just buying a tuonno (Its a great bike)...I just think the suzuki is also a great bike, has a feel that is unique from the tuono and some might prefer it. You can arguably make the suspension on this bike superior to a tuono and still come in much cheaper. $9000 for bike +$4000 for completely custom front and rear.
Thanks. I will take your advice and let a local suspension "guru" have a go at adjusting the suspension. That's the most economical path to take. If they can't make the fork perform with just changing the compression and rebound dampening, then I'll explore some of the other options you've mentioned.
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post #9 of 62 Old 08-28-2017, 01:51 AM
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Originally Posted by bruba12606 View Post
Thank you for the reply/advice. I did try letting the compression out and now the forks almost bottom out on some of the more bumpy roads on which I ride, yet they are still harsh on bumps that affect high speed compression. I weigh 195 lbs with all my riding gear. I think I'll take the bike to a local suspension "guru" and let them adjust the front forks and see if they can work any magic on them.
By all means see what a local suspension 'guru' has to say. Do a bit of research to find a good one, they are no different to any profession or trade, some know next to nothing, most are pretty mediocre, and only a small few really know what they are talking about.

Regarding using compression to prevent forks from bottoming out, you'll always end up with a harsh ride on bumpy roads doing that. You might be able to get away with that fudge on a smooth race track, but on a bumpy C grade road, no way. The reason forks bottom out is (a) excessive rider sag, (b) insufficient spring weight for the riders weight, and (d) fork oil height to low. At 195 lbs (89 Kg) I would have expected the stock springs to be somewhat in the ballpark for your weight. I don't know, just would have thought that might be the case.

What's your front rider sag set to? Also, see my last post about reducing rebound damping. The harshness from excessive rebound damping is near indistinguishable from excessive compression damping. You feel the harshness as an upward bang of the bars, so its natural to assume its compression damping in the upward stroke. The wheel being slow to return due to excessive rebound damping and striking the front edge of the next bump while still returning will feel just the same. On bumpy roads you need a faster rebound than smooth roads for this very reason.

Last edited by JohnCW; 08-28-2017 at 02:05 AM.
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post #10 of 62 Old 08-28-2017, 07:27 AM
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Thumbs up Early congrats?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bruba12606 View Post
Thanks. I plan to buy a 2017 Tuono Factory next year about this time, but I also plan to keep the Suzuki. I would just like the forks on the Suzuki to work better on the roads I regularly ride. BTW, I have a local dealer who carries Aprilia, and they seem to be competent.
Best wishes to you, and hope you'l get it and be happy with it.
Can't compare them, totally different machines.
Maybe would be the same in comparing a Ferrari to the Acura MDX.

Smart move in also keeping this one (every bike has its own personality and different purposes)


best regards
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