Track day! - Suzuki GSXS1000 Forum
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post #1 of 13 Old 10-26-2017, 05:07 PM Thread Starter
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Track day!

Not something Iíve done today, but Iíve booked my first track day booked at Oulton Park today!!

Any tips?


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post #2 of 13 Old 10-26-2017, 05:40 PM
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First track day ever?

I'd say, don't worry about everyone passing you, just go your own pace. You're there to have fun, not win a race, and red flagging the track isn't fun (trust me). I recommend studying the track map. After a few sessions, you may feel like you know the track, but you might forget about that one chicane on the other side of a rise; if you already know the track before you get there, that'll be less likely. Oulton Park is a multiconfiguration track, be wary of curves on your configuration that are straights on other configurations; the banking of the turn might change suddenly to level ground further out in the turn's radius. As the day goes on, you may feel more comfortable coming in hotter outta straights and braking later, be aware that braking performance itself may degrade throughout the session. Have fun! If you can get vids and pics definitely post them here
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post #3 of 13 Old 10-26-2017, 06:14 PM
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oh man youre going to love it!

- inspect your bike way before the track day, oil, chain, tire thread, brakes etc
- on track day find recommended tire pressures for that track and temperature
- get your suspension adjusted at the track, each track requires a different setup
- bring, chair, drinks, tools
- set a fork zip tie to make sure youre not bottoming out
- after every session check all fluids for leaks, tire pressure (hot)
- bring a gopro
- study the track before hand... learn the turn numbers and the lines by watching youtube of riders on that track
- DONT FORGET YOUR KEY... happens so often!
- at the track you should find mechanics with tools, parts etc... so dont stress too much unless you have a bunch of custom stuff on
- read twist of the wrist 2 for riding advice... stay away from bro science!
- ear plugs
- visor cleaner


Riding Tips
- Always taper off the gas and taper on the break and taper off the break. Justen mentions that 5% at the end.
- right turn, sit butt out more. People tend to be stiffer on right hand turns
- Left turn. Brake with left arm relaxed. If it's stiff it won't turn left. Opposite for right.
- Brake with body off the bike not centered on bike
- Always squeeze the bike with your heels and dig your foot to the inside of the peg hard so it doesn't scrape on the floor.


and a bunch more notes that ive collected over the years in randomness... they might help


Don't need whole track. Don't turn in way off track
Slide body over where you're holding on with inside of knee. Bike will lean less
Push inside of bar to lean more (counter steer)
Lean body out and look out into the turn not forward
corner braking - brake and downshift before corner - blip throttle - attention on constant braking

in short:
- foot position, left turn, left foot on toes, right foot heel locked onto peg
- gradual changes in everything to transfer weight smoothly
- look in one direction with a wide field of view
- light on the bars all times
- disconnect your body from the bike. Be loose. Let the bike work
- set a turn in point
- don't charge turn
- look into the turn before the turn in point
- lean butt off before braking
- brake hard until the turn in point
- trail brake into the corner. Keep tire contact patch. Suspension compressed.
- smooth off the brake, smooth on the gas
- quick initial turn in at the point by pushing on the inside bar and outside peg
- leg weight on outside peg
- steering limit is way after knee touches down
- soft hands to allow wobble to sort itself out

more details:
- instincts **** you up
- don't roll off the throttle. Lean harder
- In every corner open the gas as soon as possible; light acceleration thru the middle.
- Nothing will work if the rider runs into a corner hard, off the gas
- once the throttle is cracked on, it is rolled on smoothly, evenly, and constantly throughout the remainder of the turn
- insurance against more sliding or a highside is simply to stop rolling on the gas.
- If you come off the gas mid-turn, you lose cornering ground-clearance* at both ends, instantly.
- get on the gas as early as possible to stabilize the bike.
- brake in a straight line. Roll on the throttle before the apex gently. And get on the gas gradually keeping weight on the rear
- ideal tire stress is 40/60
- don't charge into turns. Brake earlier and focus on flying out of corners with gas throughout
- transfer weight from front to rear gently since you don't want to overload the tires.
- focus less on hard braking and focus more on gentle gas through corners. Will be faster
- good riding reduces too many confusing forces. If you experience too many forces look for a solution.
- don't hand to drag a knee and steer at the same time.
- don't adjust body when braking or turning
- position body before braking
- stay planted on bike during braking and turning
- light on handlebars. Tense hands? Doing it wrong.
- soft on handlebars allows head shake to stay in front and not transfer to body or rest of bike. Lean forward and give arms room to wobble
- Dampers are necessary on modern day motorcycles which have steep steering-head* angles, relatively* short wheelbases and lots of power
- steering dampers should not stop a shake but reduce it. Stopping it moves it to the bike.
- Too tight on the bars is the most common source of motorcycle handling problems
- Holding too tight onto the bars also makes the bike run wide in turns
- right turns are harder for newbies because they hold on too tight on the wrong side
- rear wheel slides, don't panic. Bike is working correctly. Chopping gas creates a high side.
- if sliding is caught quick (tc) it's ok and just a little shake.
- most riders go pretty stiff when they get on the brakes and thus transfer more weight onto the front than is needed
- braking with stiff arms will put you in a turn with stiff arms
- keep your weight off the seat except on the straights and mid-turn
- use your legs to hold weight up.
- disconnect your body from the bike. Be loose. Let the bike work
- don't get on the gas hard too early or you run wide and can't stand the bike up fast to full gas
- stand on the pegs to reduce seat weight. Your weight is lower on the bike and she is more settled
- can't counter steer if braking with both arms stiff
- once stable in a turn the (gas) rear wheel steers.
- some riders try to fix the suspension when they are not on the gas or too stiff on the bike.
- goal of steering is to get around a turn with as little lean as possible
- quicker initial turn in reduces lean needed in a turn
- the faster the corner the slower the turn in
- sit off the bike before the turn. Before the braking zone
- sport bikes safe turning max is way after your knee is down
- the quicker you turn in the faster you can take the turn
- you won't lose the front from a fast flick if not braking or slippery
- quick turn in. Forearms parallel with floor and push as hard as you can to turn in
- brake first then focus on turning hard.
- choose a turn in point on the track for consistency
- slow down and choose your points. Be more consistent to work on flaws
- a bad turn in point is better than no point
- stand on the pegs to lighten the bike. When turning push on the outside peg
- eyes... don't move them around too much or you'll get dizzy... use peripheral vision as much as possible
- hold your eye attention wide at all times... scares narrow it down and its dangerous
- practice wide vision while cycling or walking to not forget
- find reference point and don't stare at it. Look into the turn before the turn in point
- turn in point. Find it. Look into the turn. Stop braking at point. Turn in. Get on the gas. Smile
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post #4 of 13 Old 10-27-2017, 07:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sangedegsx View Post
oh man youre going to love it!

- inspect your bike way before the track day, oil, chain, tire thread, brakes etc
- on track day find recommended tire pressures for that track and temperature
- get your suspension adjusted at the track, each track requires a different setup
- bring, chair, drinks, tools
- set a fork zip tie to make sure youre not bottoming out
- after every session check all fluids for leaks, tire pressure (hot)
- bring a gopro
- study the track before hand... learn the turn numbers and the lines by watching youtube of riders on that track
- DONT FORGET YOUR KEY... happens so often!
- at the track you should find mechanics with tools, parts etc... so dont stress too much unless you have a bunch of custom stuff on
- read twist of the wrist 2 for riding advice... stay away from bro science!
- ear plugs
- visor cleaner


Riding Tips
- Always taper off the gas and taper on the break and taper off the break. Justen mentions that 5% at the end.
- right turn, sit butt out more. People tend to be stiffer on right hand turns
- Left turn. Brake with left arm relaxed. If it's stiff it won't turn left. Opposite for right.
- Brake with body off the bike not centered on bike
- Always squeeze the bike with your heels and dig your foot to the inside of the peg hard so it doesn't scrape on the floor.


and a bunch more notes that ive collected over the years in randomness... they might help


Don't need whole track. Don't turn in way off track
Slide body over where you're holding on with inside of knee. Bike will lean less
Push inside of bar to lean more (counter steer)
Lean body out and look out into the turn not forward
corner braking - brake and downshift before corner - blip throttle - attention on constant braking

in short:
- foot position, left turn, left foot on toes, right foot heel locked onto peg
- gradual changes in everything to transfer weight smoothly
- look in one direction with a wide field of view
- light on the bars all times
- disconnect your body from the bike. Be loose. Let the bike work
- set a turn in point
- don't charge turn
- look into the turn before the turn in point
- lean butt off before braking
- brake hard until the turn in point
- trail brake into the corner. Keep tire contact patch. Suspension compressed.
- smooth off the brake, smooth on the gas
- quick initial turn in at the point by pushing on the inside bar and outside peg
- leg weight on outside peg
- steering limit is way after knee touches down
- soft hands to allow wobble to sort itself out

more details:
- instincts **** you up
- don't roll off the throttle. Lean harder
- In every corner open the gas as soon as possible; light acceleration thru the middle.
- Nothing will work if the rider runs into a corner hard, off the gas
- once the throttle is cracked on, it is rolled on smoothly, evenly, and constantly throughout the remainder of the turn
- insurance against more sliding or a highside is simply to stop rolling on the gas.
- If you come off the gas mid-turn, you lose cornering ground-clearance* at both ends, instantly.
- get on the gas as early as possible to stabilize the bike.
- brake in a straight line. Roll on the throttle before the apex gently. And get on the gas gradually keeping weight on the rear
- ideal tire stress is 40/60
- don't charge into turns. Brake earlier and focus on flying out of corners with gas throughout
- transfer weight from front to rear gently since you don't want to overload the tires.
- focus less on hard braking and focus more on gentle gas through corners. Will be faster
- good riding reduces too many confusing forces. If you experience too many forces look for a solution.
- don't hand to drag a knee and steer at the same time.
- don't adjust body when braking or turning
- position body before braking
- stay planted on bike during braking and turning
- light on handlebars. Tense hands? Doing it wrong.
- soft on handlebars allows head shake to stay in front and not transfer to body or rest of bike. Lean forward and give arms room to wobble
- Dampers are necessary on modern day motorcycles which have steep steering-head* angles, relatively* short wheelbases and lots of power
- steering dampers should not stop a shake but reduce it. Stopping it moves it to the bike.
- Too tight on the bars is the most common source of motorcycle handling problems
- Holding too tight onto the bars also makes the bike run wide in turns
- right turns are harder for newbies because they hold on too tight on the wrong side
- rear wheel slides, don't panic. Bike is working correctly. Chopping gas creates a high side.
- if sliding is caught quick (tc) it's ok and just a little shake.
- most riders go pretty stiff when they get on the brakes and thus transfer more weight onto the front than is needed
- braking with stiff arms will put you in a turn with stiff arms
- keep your weight off the seat except on the straights and mid-turn
- use your legs to hold weight up.
- disconnect your body from the bike. Be loose. Let the bike work
- don't get on the gas hard too early or you run wide and can't stand the bike up fast to full gas
- stand on the pegs to reduce seat weight. Your weight is lower on the bike and she is more settled
- can't counter steer if braking with both arms stiff
- once stable in a turn the (gas) rear wheel steers.
- some riders try to fix the suspension when they are not on the gas or too stiff on the bike.
- goal of steering is to get around a turn with as little lean as possible
- quicker initial turn in reduces lean needed in a turn
- the faster the corner the slower the turn in
- sit off the bike before the turn. Before the braking zone
- sport bikes safe turning max is way after your knee is down
- the quicker you turn in the faster you can take the turn
- you won't lose the front from a fast flick if not braking or slippery
- quick turn in. Forearms parallel with floor and push as hard as you can to turn in
- brake first then focus on turning hard.
- choose a turn in point on the track for consistency
- slow down and choose your points. Be more consistent to work on flaws
- a bad turn in point is better than no point
- stand on the pegs to lighten the bike. When turning push on the outside peg
- eyes... don't move them around too much or you'll get dizzy... use peripheral vision as much as possible
- hold your eye attention wide at all times... scares narrow it down and its dangerous
- practice wide vision while cycling or walking to not forget
- find reference point and don't stare at it. Look into the turn before the turn in point
- turn in point. Find it. Look into the turn. Stop braking at point. Turn in. Get on the gas. Smile
and if you are thinking about all those little gems you'll probably fall off on the first corner

Fair play sangedegsx! if I could find a "taking my hat off smilie" I'd be using it right now


Just make sure you're bikes fit and your gear is fit. Nothing will turn you into Rossi overnight so start off slow and build up as you get used to it. Most of all, enjoy it
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post #5 of 13 Old 10-27-2017, 11:11 AM
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and if you are thinking about all those little gems you'll probably fall off on the first corner

Haha true. I work on one thing a day or a session. Try to work on more than one and this stupid brain canít handle it lol



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post #6 of 13 Old 10-27-2017, 06:33 PM Thread Starter
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Cheers for the pointers guys! I will take all of them on board, Iíve got a friend coming down hopefully with a decent camera to get some pictures of me, taking my mates race bike down as well for some r&d so it will be a good day . Other then taking my mirrors off and taping my headlight what else do I need to do to my bike?


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post #7 of 13 Old 10-27-2017, 09:27 PM
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Cheers for the pointers guys! I will take all of them on board, Iíve got a friend coming down hopefully with a decent camera to get some pictures of me, taking my mates race bike down as well for some r&d so it will be a good day . Other then taking my mirrors off and taping my headlight what else do I need to do to my bike?


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Cover your number plate for insurance purposes...
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post #8 of 13 Old 10-27-2017, 10:25 PM
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Cover your number plate for insurance purposes...
No road bike insurance if you ride at a track day, but you know that Tony, so watch for those crazy types overtaking your inside of curves.
There were always those who are A grade, but pick to ride in a slower group so they can overtake like Marquez on Rossi. Just kick them hard - works for Rossi.

I did a few track days 20 years ago, and it was a buzz. But being slower and slower there was no Z class, the slowest was D and they ALL rode like Alien's too.
I took the SV650 to one, and was always ahead of a fellow on a new R6, but the fellow always got me on the straights again.
15 minutes feeling 10 foot tall and it was over for the session again
The bike tyres need to be good to get through scrutineering - you may be shocked how worn your tires become with all the heat from the continued high speeds.

After 5 or 6 sessions, I was truly knackered, I pulled in on the last half way - the concentration is the real killer, and remember to drink plenty of water.
Those GP Stars are always sweating hard at the interviews, so you need to look the part too for the Camera Man.

Rob.
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post #9 of 13 Old 11-29-2017, 05:01 PM Thread Starter
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Hi all track day went well! After the track started to dry up it was good! Bike handled like a dream! Stock tyres took a couple of laps to warm up! Think itís time to sell the gsxs and get myself a track bike!!


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post #10 of 13 Old 11-30-2017, 06:33 AM
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Nothing beats riding like a hooligan in the proper place. It gives you a chance to relax and really explore the potential of your machine
Glad you enjoyed it!

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