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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Currently running a 2018 gsx s1000f which I've had 3 service's from new. Last service was at 5,558 miles, I have now reached 11,000 miles so it looks like I've missed a service along the way.
So now my question is!...what would the garage recommend for this service and what cost would I be looking at to give me a idea of price. I'm located in the UK. 馃憤
 

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According to the service interval table in my digital shop manual for the F version:
  • Change oil.
  • Inspect air filter.
  • Replace spark plugs at 7500 miles.
  • Replace brake fluid every 4 years.
  • Replace brake hose every 4 years.
  • Replace engine coolant.
The spark plugs gives me pause as that seems really short intervals but since they're only $32 for all four I'd probably just do them. I mean, this isn't a high-performance motorcycle ridden hard making 200 horsepower, right?

From having done most of the above when I bought my 2016, I'd say changing brake fluid and changing engine coolant is a must do now. However, to vacuum brake fluid (front and rear) is a really easy 20 minute job with a cheap $20 Chinese vacuum brake kit and a $5 DOT 4 fluid, and engine coolant was also a quick 20 minute job, of which 17 minutes were spent warming up the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks very much for the reply that's really helpful. 馃憤


According to the service interval table in my digital shop manual for the F version:
  • Change oil.
  • Inspect air filter.
  • Replace spark plugs at 7500 miles.
  • Replace brake fluid every 4 years.
  • Replace brake hose every 4 years.
  • Replace engine coolant.
The spark plugs gives me pause as that seems really short intervals but since they're only $32 for all four I'd probably just do them. I mean, this isn't a high-performance motorcycle ridden hard making 200 horsepower, right?

From having done most of the above when I bought my 2016, I'd say changing brake fluid and changing engine coolant is a must do now. However, to vacuum brake fluid (front and rear) is a really easy 20 minute job with a cheap $20 Chinese vacuum brake kit and a $5 DOT 4 fluid, and engine coolant was also a quick 20 minute job, of which 17 minutes were spent warming up the engine.
 

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Change the oil and filter, check your chain tension. Do it all yourself for under 拢50, even if you splash out on a new sump nut washer.

As for a garage price, that'll depend on where in the UK and if you take it to your local grease monkey or a dealer.
 

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My gen 1 R6 was likely on the factory plugs at 20yrs and 30k miles, whatever they were they were pretty tired. The symptoms were a tendency to stall at low rpms when feathering the clutch off a stop (very annoying in the stop-and-go). New plugs fixed that right up, but not much noticable difference elsewhere; so maybe you don't need them at 7k, but getting towards 15k I'd vote yes.

I do a full brake teardown every 2yrs max; clean the pistons, make sure they're all moving and the various bits and pieces aren't seized. My old bandit with those dreadful 6 pot tokico's needed it badly every year. My R6's prev owner never serviced the brakes and they REALLY needed it- fluid in the rear looked like chocolate milk- very naughty.

Concur on the coolant change- I do it yearly, even if the coolant is fine it gives a chance to inspect the cap seal, hoses and overflow bottle.

This time of year while waiting for the weather to get better is a great opportunity to get the bike prepped.
 

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As above:

Oil and Filter
Air filter
Plugs
Brake fluid at about 5 years (definitely not hoses! that's just BS to avoid litigation)

Prices in the UK are all over the shop, so goodness know what people pay [a lot is location dependant] - Lots of us do it ourselves as it isn't difficult, just time consuming on the F.
 

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in my maintenance schedule I see a brake fluid change every 2 years and that is in line with all the other bikes I had, so I would not wait 4 years to do that.
I reckon about 4 years is correct - I have a brake-fluid moisture detector and I find 5-6 years is about when it goes from green to yellow and the fluid has absorbed enough moisture (1-2%) to have lowered the boiling point and reduced effectiveness/increased risk of fading due to bubbles.

Again Suzuki use 2 years to minimise litigation.
 

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My gen 1 R6 was likely on the factory plugs at 20yrs and 30k miles, whatever they were they were pretty tired. The symptoms were a tendency to stall at low rpms when feathering the clutch off a stop (very annoying in the stop-and-go). New plugs fixed that right up, but not much noticable difference elsewhere; so maybe you don't need them at 7k, but getting towards 15k I'd vote yes.

I do a full brake teardown every 2yrs max; clean the pistons, make sure they're all moving and the various bits and pieces aren't seized. My old bandit with those dreadful 6 pot tokico's needed it badly every year. My R6's prev owner never serviced the brakes and they REALLY needed it- fluid in the rear looked like chocolate milk- very naughty.

Concur on the coolant change- I do it yearly, even if the coolant is fine it gives a chance to inspect the cap seal, hoses and overflow bottle.

This time of year while waiting for the weather to get better is a great opportunity to get the bike prepped.
Can you share any instructions on the brake teardown? do you rebuild the calipers - if so - do you reuse the rubber o-rings or replace them?
 

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Can you share any instructions on the brake teardown? do you rebuild the calipers - if so - do you reuse the rubber o-rings or replace them?
It's on 4c on the shop manual. I've never needed to rebuild motorcycle calipers but I've almost always needed to rebuild automobile calipers, and it's usually a stuck piston due to brake dust making a ring that, presumably, cuts into the hardened rubber o-rings.

I've always found rebuilding brake calipers to be a fairly serious endeavor. It's not like replacing brake pads or cleaning the brake calipers and pistons from entrenched brake dust. It's a magnitude harder. Splitting the calipers is fairly easy if you have an impact driver but it's ridiculously difficult if you're holding the caliper with one had while torquing with the other. Then there's getting the pistons out.
 

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Can you share any instructions on the brake teardown? do you rebuild the calipers - if so - do you reuse the rubber o-rings or replace them?
Some of the details vary- eg those old Bandit tokico's could be split (meaning the caliper can be separated into 2 halves- only had to do that once on a profoundly neglected friend's bike). The R6 calipers had a big hex recess head cover that could be removed to expose the backside of the pistons- not recommended to do that, thankfully I never had to. For the gxs, it doesn't look like any of that is possible or desirable- which is good- those intrusive measures can turn into trouble.

So this fall when I do the gsxs I will take off the calipers, pads, shields etc, front and rear. Then use compressed air to slowly push out the pistons- have to be careful to not just blow them out which can do damage. A piece of plywood or similar positioned in place of the pads can be sized to get the pistons most of the way out. Then the compressed air will get them mostly out, so they can be removed by hand. In extreme cases compressed air isn't enough, so plan b is to fill the caliper with oil and fit a grease zerk in the bleeder hole, then pump in a bit of grease to force the pistons out- PITA but it works really well. Oil is lots easier to clean out of the caliper than if you fill the whole thing with grease.

Once out, the the pistons are cleaned (brass brush and solvents, maybe a wirewheel, but no sandpaper or grinding) and seals examined, lots of times they are fine and can go back in. On neglected and/or old brakes they'll usually need replacement and lots of cleaning and scraping in their recesses in the caliper. The piston bores are inspected and cleaned with a toothbrush and solvents.

The rest of the calipers are scrubbed with solvents and brushes to clear all the brake muck etc, then reassembled. All screw-in fasteners (except the brake bleeders) get grease or other antiseize. I always wet the pistons and seals with a bit of fresh brake fluid to help things go together. If pads need replacing, I do that too. If not then I scuff them with with coarse sandpaper and swap them between calipers. Discs are sprayed with brake cleaner and also scuffed with sandpaper- this helps remove any glaze or baked-on dirt etc.

Before reinstalling and reconnecting hoses, all the fluid is drained from the master cylinders- they might need cleaning too. Anyhow once all thats done and everything is back together, then the tedium of filling and bleeding begins. Sometimes its easy sometimes not... Once the master cylinder is pumping well thru the calipers then I bleed out another reservoir full thru the caliper bleeders. A vacuum bleeder can save a lot of time, particularly if having trouble getting the master cylinder pumping.

Usually takes me a few evenings in the garage to get it done, maybe up to a week of evenings depending on how much work is needed or if waiting for parts.

The R6 brakes went quickly, about 2 evenings total after the first overhaul which took a bunch of work. The 1st time thru the R6 brakes I had a really stuck piston, I tried a piston removal tool- didn't work either- I needed the oil & grease trick with it- but compressed air worked fine after. The Bandit brakes were always a mess; seized pistons mostly, it was a fight getting some of them out- it took several evenings, or perhaps an all day weekend. Being new, I expect the gsxs brakes to go quickly.

Its desirable to have a full set of piston seals handy when you go in, save them in the parts box if not needed. Sometimes one will be smeared/twisted/damaged so you don't need the whole set at once but having it handy can save a bunch of time.

Its one of the bigger and messier jobs short of diving into the engine, but I find the quality of the braking and generally easier maintenance next time around to be well worth it. Its lots easier to do the routine on brakes that were overhauled the year before vs brakes that have been unmaintained for several years (even if fluid was changed- that won't unstick a piston).
 

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As said, only overhaul the calipers if you have to - it's not a routine service activity.
Depends on the calipers I suppose- those tokico calipers desperately needed frequent teardown and overhaul. Its likely all the gsxs calipers will need is to take them off the bike with hoses attached, then using the master cylinder pump the pistons out halfway, then take off hoses so everything can be cleaned. OTOH it is well to be ready to go all the way in if a piston seizes, particularly if the calipers haven't been serviced in several years.
 

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As above:

Oil and Filter
Air filter
Plugs
Brake fluid at about 5 years (definitely not hoses! that's just BS to avoid litigation)

Prices in the UK are all over the shop, so goodness know what people pay [a lot is location dependant] - Lots of us do it ourselves as it isn't difficult, just time consuming on the F.
I'm going to caveat this - I would replace brake pipes if they were deteriorated or damaged.
 

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I'm going to caveat this - I would replace brake pipes if they were deteriorated or damaged.
The shop manual says replace brake lines every 4 years. Steel braided brake lines are much safer, in my opinion, as I have had rubber brakes cut by the rider in front of me. Not catastrophically, but enough to see the white nylon layer bulge outward from brake lever squeeze.
 
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