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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
1) install a k&n OR bmc air filter. Allows better intake air flow

2) change the end can to a less restrictive slip-on option. I experimented with a lot of options. The chamber inside the stock end can was designed well, too well in fact. It causes some of the jerky response and vibes (the rest is caused by the current/ stock ECU program). I will post a photo of the best option that has worked thus far for me. It's a slip-on, straight thru baffled design. No modification required.

3) go down 1 tooth on the rear sprocket (43t) if you really want to tone down jerkyness without sacrificing your low/ midrange grunt
 

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1) install a k&n OR bmc air filter. Allows better intake air flow

2) change the end can to a less restrictive slip-on option. I experimented with a lot of options. The chamber inside the stock end can was designed well, too well in fact. It causes some of the jerky response and vibes (the rest is caused by the current/ stock ECU program). I will post a photo of the best option that has worked thus far for me. It's a slip-on, straight thru baffled design. No modification required.

3) go down 1 tooth on the rear sprocket (43t) if you really want to tone down jerkyness without sacrificing your low/ midrange grunt
Not sure I agree, the end can does virtually nothing and the restriction is in the cat, muffler box and exvalve, I have removed the end can and gone for rides and it's hardly any louder and makes no difference, also it's no point replacing the air filter with the restrictions in the stock exhaust, these mods would give performance upgrades with fueling/ecu upgrades but the snatching can be fixed with fueling/ecu upgrades alone.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
1) install a k&n OR bmc air filter. Allows better intake air flow

2) change the end can to a less restrictive slip-on option. I experimented with a lot of options. The chamber inside the stock end can was designed well, too well in fact. It causes some of the jerky response and vibes (the rest is caused by the current/ stock ECU program). I will post a photo of the best option that has worked thus far for me. It's a slip-on, straight thru baffled design. No modification required.

3) go down 1 tooth on the rear sprocket (43t) if you really want to tone down jerkyness without sacrificing your low/ midrange grunt
Not sure I agree, the end can does virtually nothing and the restriction is in the cat, muffler box and exvalve, I have removed the end can and gone for rides and it's hardly any louder and makes no difference, also it's no point replacing the air filter with the restrictions in the stock exhaust, these mods would give performance upgrades with fueling/ecu upgrades but the snatching can be fixed with fueling/ecu upgrades alone.
I have played around with this bike for 8 months. Who said anything about the bike being louder. Re- read my original statements and pay attention to whats there.

Whats on the end of your cat does make a difference. Ride around with out your end can on one tank of gas and you will notice performance and fuel economy drop. Take your end can off after you put a new filter (k&n or bmc) and then come back and post. It is ignorant to comment on something that you haven't done.

If you know anything about our bikes, you would already know that they will make minor adjustments own its on once you install a better air filter and slip-on. You dont have to remap the ecu to notice a difference.

The air filter, end can, cat and ecu all contribute to the jerkyness. Its not one thing alone.
 

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2+ things that will reduce jerky throttle and vibration!
1) Less coffee
2) Learn throttle control
3) Let it warm up first (my Honda Civic Si is a bucking bronco until up to temp).
4) Adjust the slop out of your throttle.

Sorry, not trying to be a jerk, but on my bike, it just isn't a problem, unless it hasn't warmed up and I'm hitting bumps that cause my wrist to do irresponsible things. :)
 

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2+ things that will reduce jerky throttle and vibration!
1) Less coffee
2) Learn throttle control
3) Let it warm up first (my Honda Civic Si is a bucking bronco until up to temp).
4) Adjust the slop out of your throttle.

Sorry, not trying to be a jerk, but on my bike, it just isn't a problem, unless it hasn't warmed up and I'm hitting bumps that cause my wrist to do irresponsible things. :)
I know this is a 5 month old thread and that some people seem to think a jerky throttle is all in the mind. However, I think that chain slack is also a big player in jerkiness. Especially with a throttle with a lot of slack.
 

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2+ things that will reduce jerky throttle and vibration!
1) Less coffee
2) Learn throttle control
3) Let it warm up first (my Honda Civic Si is a bucking bronco until up to temp).
4) Adjust the slop out of your throttle.

Sorry, not trying to be a jerk, but on my bike, it just isn't a problem, unless it hasn't warmed up and I'm hitting bumps that cause my wrist to do irresponsible things. :)

You guys saying to learn throttle control probably never run your between 8 and 11k in the curves. Real easy to be smooth at lower RPM's. Not so easy in the upper RPM's where the power hits hard. I venture a guess all those professional testers at the big mags and websites (some who also race for real on the weekends) have a **** ton more experience than you with the latest powerful bikes, and virtually ALL OF THEM noticed the jerkiness.

I love my bike, and have not lifted a finger yet to fix the throttle as it is not a problem 95% of the time, but I have been thrown off my line several times in a curve because of the abrupt throttle in the upper RPM's. I have adjusted out all slack, actually the day I brought it home because whoever set up my bike did not adjust it all based on the fact the adjuster lock nut was backed way off and not locking anything....and there was MUCHO throttle play.

The problem is not exclusive to our bikes either, many of the latest bikes meeting euro 4 display the same issue to some extent with the notable exception of Triumph, who seem to have the magic formula for obtaining sublime throttle response on all their bikes.

The fact so many have greatly reduced or eliminated the snatch with a tune or other fueling tricks should tell you something about whats causing the problem.
 

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You guys saying to learn throttle control probably never run your between 8 and 11k in the curves. Real easy to be smooth at lower RPM's. Not so easy in the upper RPM's where the power hits hard. I venture a guess all those professional testers at the big mags and websites (some who also race for real on the weekends) have a **** ton more experience than you with the latest powerful bikes, and virtually ALL OF THEM noticed the jerkiness.

I love my bike, and have not lifted a finger yet to fix the throttle as it is not a problem 95% of the time, but I have been thrown off my line several times in a curve because of the abrupt throttle in the upper RPM's. I have adjusted out all slack, actually the day I brought it home because whoever set up my bike did not adjust it all based on the fact the adjuster lock nut was backed way off and not locking anything....and there was MUCHO throttle play.

The problem is not exclusive to our bikes either, many of the latest bikes meeting euro 4 display the same issue to some extent with the notable exception of Triumph, who seem to have the magic formula for obtaining sublime throttle response on all their bikes.

The fact so many have greatly reduced or eliminated the snatch with a tune or other fueling tricks should tell you something about whats causing the problem.
Your absolutely right, and I'm sorry if I came off as a jerk. I was really just trying to make a joke. I'm not a track guy and I usually only hit the high RPMs on the straights, because I'm also a sissy. I realize this bike does have a throttle problem, and it seems worse on some bikes than others. Maybe mine sucks too and I'm such a sissy that I can't ever get to the performance level where the problem becomes apparent. But, I am enjoying my bike, so Suzuki did something, or some bikes right.
 

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2+ things that will reduce jerky throttle and vibration!
1) Less coffee
2) Learn throttle control
3) Let it warm up first (my Honda Civic Si is a bucking bronco until up to temp).
4) Adjust the slop out of your throttle.

Sorry, not trying to be a jerk, but on my bike, it just isn't a problem, unless it hasn't warmed up and I'm hitting bumps that cause my wrist to do irresponsible things. :)
Here here! Couldn't agree more!
Jeffro
 

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a ok!

Here here! Couldn't agree more!
Jeffro
I use a K & N for economical reasons, clean/oil/place it back (don't want to keep purchasing the OEM, ride way to many miles)

Middle finger over brake, smooth palm, relax body, over bumps don't move the arms (hips become part of the bike.........maybe growing up riding horses trained me well).

Front comes up at 11k out of canyon corners at 2nd & third, hand stays relaxed, line doesn't change............unless some a******** comes in to my lane,,,,,,,ease of throttle, counter steer and find another line and punch out of there! (best therapy);)
 

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Middle finger over brake, smooth palm, relax body, over bumps don't move the arms (hips become part of the bike.........maybe growing up riding horses trained me well).
I've kinda wondered that about fellow GSXS riders. Prior to this bike, I was index and middle finger over brake, ring and pinky on throttle. But with this one I've found the sensitive (I'm iffy on calling it snatchy) throttle is much better managed with index and thumb rolling throttle and middle and ring ridding brake, pinky just kinda hanging out.

Loose body is totally a must for riding, I think of it dancing, we as riders lead, but knowing how to follow when the road and conditions have an opinion is necessary.

PS, I got myself quite drunk in the last little while.
 

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Agree, except the drinking bit (can't stand drinking)

I've kinda wondered that about fellow GSXS riders. Prior to this bike, I was index and middle finger over brake, ring and pinky on throttle. But with this one I've found the sensitive (I'm iffy on calling it snatchy) throttle is much better managed with index and thumb rolling throttle and middle and ring ridding brake, pinky just kinda hanging out.

Loose body is totally a must for riding, I think of it dancing, we as riders lead, but knowing how to follow when the road and conditions have an opinion is necessary.

PS, I got myself quite drunk in the last little while.

You are right about the pinky, kind of like the pinky toe (doesn't do much and hard to cut the nail, and hit the corners barefoot from time to time......... without a drink i may add;))

In Fact, have made a video (mine is the 2016 with the supposed throttle problem, and yes very touchy, and did stiffened the throttle a bit in 5 minutes/adjustment with the housing next to it) of riding it with the side palm of my hand only (very gently) , at between 2,500-3000 rpm. 30 & 35 mph (because many complained about these low rpm's).

And yes it sputters a bit at 2000-2800 rpm, but you know what? i don't care! have had many older in line 4's that did the same. I don't expect an in line 4 to run smooth below 15-20 mph.

Am burned out on this throttle stuff (only the people with arguments back and forth, not us that make due with what we got, and love it just the way she is), some one posted losing the line at corners between 8-11k. I don't, and i know what he means (not talking bad about him at all, it's just my view). But knowing how this bike acts and reacts..................well? just compensate with extra smoothness (makes me improve my skills/always learning/always room for improvement).

My neighbor had an issue with n older VFR, once the power kicked in it jerked hard (cornering) , but he compensated.

Another one talks about how mush better the Tuono is, well...........**** dude, get the Tuono.

I f***** up, shouldn't have payed 12k cash out the door. and offered some one here not happy with their's, and save some money for another Suzuki!;)
 

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People's responses to the throttle issue is insulting to those that do have an issue.
The throttle is NOT the same on every bike! I've ridden three of these bikes (from the same dealer), not one rode the same and they were not slightly different they were wildly different.
Saying people need better, steadier hands or whatever bull you guys are coming out with is so far from the actual truth.

Take the pi** criticise people's riding capability all you want you just sound like mor*ns who's bike's don't have a problem.


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I just picked up a 16 S1000 and it's definitely a snatchy throttle ... I've seen this before on plenty of other bikes, it's nothing new or that unusual. The only real fix for this problem is fueling.... Getting a proper match between TPS/Air/Fuel at the right RPMS .... I'm not even looking for more power or anything but the first thing I am going to do to this bike is fit a PCV and take it to a local tuning shop and have it tuned on a dyno. The throttle response will smooth out and feel a lot less like the response you get tapping a guy on the back that is wigged out on meth ;)
 

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People's responses to the throttle issue is insulting to those that do have an issue.
The throttle is NOT the same on every bike! I've ridden three of these bikes (from the same dealer), not one rode the same and they were not slightly different they were wildly different.
Saying people need better, steadier hands or whatever bull you guys are coming out with is so far from the actual truth.

Take the pi** criticise people's riding capability all you want you just sound like mor*ns who's bike's don't have a problem.


Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
I agree. I've been riding bikes since about 8 years old. I have had a many bikes and have never had a throttle issue with any except my Gixxes.

Like I said earlier, pretty much every single mag and website who reviewed our bike noted the abrupt throttle. Every ****ing one of them.

End of argument.
 

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Agreed, it's silly to call someone out for noticing something this obvious. When I got it new my 2005 Kawasaki Z1000 felt almost exactly like this.


I agree. I've been riding bikes since about 8 years old. I have had a many bikes and have never had a throttle issue with any except my Gixxes.

Like I said earlier, pretty much every single mag and website who reviewed our bike noted the abrupt throttle. Every ****ing one of them.

End of argument.
 

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Like I said earlier, pretty much every single mag and website who reviewed our bike noted the abrupt throttle. Every ****ing one of them.

End of argument.
At static throttle you get continuous RPM. If we can agree on that, then it's all down to rider opinion. Having never seen the actual ECU programming, I can only say that it feels to me, and I cannot fathom that it would be programmed other wise, that once up to temp, static throttle results in continuous RPM. Past that, there's no hard line to separate sensitive/snatchy.

It's simply impossible for the engine RPM to change at higher than third order without smooth angular acceleration. Engine RPM cannot jump from one value to a higher one without passing through every RPM in between. Just like you can't go from a stop to 100mph without passing through every speed in between, however briefly. Even if the ECU dumped increased fuel a hundred fold between one degree of throttle and the next half degree, the engine must smoothly ramp up from one RPM to the next. That's the end of argument.

Now, for rider opinion, I feel the throttle response is sensitive but manageable for me, with my experience, my technique, and my riding style. Notice how many of the factors involve me, because it's my opinion. If a rider feels that the throttle response is too much, then that's every bit as viable an opinion.
 

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I don't believe that anyone said that you were getting from 4000RPM to 7000RPM without going through 5 and 6 ... that would be completely absurd to suggest ....
but at different RPM ranges the fuel response to throttle position sensor position is utterly non-linear, at least on the bike that I just got. You can call it "sensitive" but
it's more than just being sensitive, the throttle response/fuel curve behaves like a startled meth junkie around certain RPM ranges and it isn't normal. I've owned dozens
of bikes over the last 30 years and I've only ever encountered a handful, maybe 3-4 that have behaved this way and they were all fixed by getting them on the dyno and
getting the fuel/air/ignition setup properly for the bike rather than to meet some required emissions spec for a factory bike.


I agree. I've been riding bikes since about 8 years old. I have had a many bikes and have never had a throttle issue with any except my Gixxes.

Like I said earlier, pretty much every single mag and website who reviewed our bike noted the abrupt throttle. Every ****ing one of them.

End of argument.
At static throttle you get continuous RPM. If we can agree on that, then it's all down to rider opinion. Having never seen the actual ECU programming, I can only say that it feels to me, and I cannot fathom that it would be programmed other wise, that once up to temp, static throttle results in continuous RPM. Past that, there's no hard line to separate sensitive/snatchy.

It's simply impossible for the engine RPM to change at higher than third order without smooth angular acceleration. Engine RPM cannot jump from one value to a higher one without passing through every RPM in between. Just like you can't go from a stop to 100mph without passing through every speed in between, however briefly. Even if the ECU dumped increased fuel a hundred fold between one degree of throttle and the next half degree, the engine must smoothly ramp up from one RPM to the next. That's the end of argument.

Now, for rider opinion, I feel the throttle response is sensitive but manageable for me, with my experience, my technique, and my riding style. Notice how many of the factors involve me, because it's my opinion. If a rider feels that the throttle response is too much, then that's every bit as viable an opinion.
 

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I don't believe that anyone said that you were getting from 4000RPM to 7000RPM without going through 5 and 6 ... that would be completely absurd to suggest ....
but at different RPM ranges the fuel response to throttle position sensor position is utterly non-linear, at least on the bike that I just got. You can call it "sensitive" but
it's more than just being sensitive, the throttle response/fuel curve behaves like a startled meth junkie around certain RPM ranges and it isn't normal. I've owned dozens
of bikes over the last 30 years and I've only ever encountered a handful, maybe 3-4 that have behaved this way and they were all fixed by getting them on the dyno and
getting the fuel/air/ignition setup properly for the bike rather than to meet some required emissions spec for a factory bike.
And that's your opinion, and it's a perfectly valid one. My point is, there's no underlying objective reality to compare it to. Third order, by the way, is the rate at which acceleration changes (called jerk), and the same principle of continuity applies. What this means is that there can exist a level of fine throttle control at which the motorcycle acceleration is almost perfectly linear (with a reciprocating piston engine jerk cannot always be zero). Whether or not that level of fine control corresponds to an individuals expectations is purely a matter of opinion. Are there ways to adjust throttle response, of course, and I'm sure there are motorcycles where riders have adjusted it to be more responsive than stock.

Bottom line, pissing on other people for opinion that don't personally affect anyone else is totally non constructive. And there's nothing to this but opinions.
 

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If you were talking about a cable throttled bike with a carburetor then what you are saying would be true, but we aren't, we can program the throttle body to squirt as much or as little fuel as we want at any point in the TPS range. The throttle by wire is just talking to switches with a sensor .... you can tell the bike to spurt double the amount of fuel at 5% than it does at 8% ..... or you can tell it when the sensor goes from 5% to 6% you increase fuel by 11% .... it's entirely subjective. It's like the difference between a pilot in a real plane using his hands on the stick to fly vs a drone pilot using a remote control to fly a drone a thousand miles away .... any one of the commands the drone pilot uses could be remapped to different commands ;)

And that's your opinion, and it's a perfectly valid one. My point is, there's no underlying objective reality to compare it to. Third order, by the way, is the rate at which acceleration changes (called jerk), and the same principle of continuity applies. What this means is that there can exist a level of fine throttle control at which the motorcycle acceleration is almost perfectly linear (with a reciprocating piston engine jerk cannot always be zero). Whether or not that level of fine control corresponds to an individuals expectations is purely a matter of opinion. Are there ways to adjust throttle response, of course, and I'm sure there are motorcycles where riders have adjusted it to be more responsive than stock.

Bottom line, pissing on other people for opinion that don't personally affect anyone else is totally non constructive. And there's nothing to this but opinions.
 
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