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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been thinking very seriously about selling my old Monster S2R800 and Guzzi Norge and buying a reliable do-it-all bike that does well in the canyons. First, a few questions:

1. How bad are the vibes? I've owned two FZ6's and sold both because the I4 tingle made my hands go numb - loved those bikes otherwise. Conversely, I once had a GSX650F that had the smoothest engine I've experienced. Where does the GSX-S750 fall on that scale? Test rode an XSR900 and thought the vibes were OK, but would become tiresome after an hour.

2. What is the general ownership experience like? Love my Italian bikes, but I'd rather spend time with my kid than replace timing belts again. Fun fact: The Guzzi uses the same belt as a mid-90's Subaru Justy. Who says Guzzi uses old tech?

3. Are any shock swaps possible? Loved my SV650 with emulators and a GSXR shock. Once dialed in, that thing out-handled my Monster.
 

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We are talking 4 cyl engines rigidly mounted...and vibes is the price to pay for 'performance and low weight" The balancing shaft compensate somewhat but not as good as rubber, and the vibes would be present at some areas in the powerband. If you smooth them here, it goes worse there.

This is a very subjective question. What is 'buttery smooth' for someone, specially if it came from ...let's say an old Harley...it could be 'horrible vibes' from somewhat who came from....maybe a Goldwing.

I have owned the FZ-09, which was terrible, and have the GSXS-S1000 which is smoother than the triple, but still, the 30 years old Kawasaki Zeph 750 I own is smoother than both with partially rubber mounted engine, and still the 85 Yamaha FJ1100 I once had, was even smoother, fully rubber mounted......but it was 100 lbs heavier.........the GSX-S750 would be smoother than the GSX-S1000 because has smaller cylinder, less reciprocating mass.

Even vibes change from bike to bike on same model. With less bigger cylinders at the proper angle, the high buzz changes to lower freq. thumps which to some maybe more soothing...ummmh.....that Guzzi V7 (845cc), looks good......not a 'performance bike' but more of a true do-it-all and more of a relaxer..

Have the electric ones come down on price yet?????
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This is a very subjective question. What is 'buttery smooth' for someone, specially if it came from ...let's say an old Harley...it could be 'horrible vibes' from somewhat who came from....maybe a Goldwing.

I have owned the FZ-09, which was terrible, and have the GSXS-S1000 which is smoother than the triple, but still, the 30 years old Kawasaki Zeph 750 I own is smoother than both with partially rubber mounted engine, and still the 85 Yamaha FJ1100 I once had, was even smoother, fully rubber mounted......but it was 100 lbs heavier.........the GSX-S750 would be smoother than the GSX-S1000 because has smaller cylinder, less reciprocating mass.

Even vibes change from bike to bike on same model. With less bigger cylinders at the proper angle, the high buzz changes to lower freq. thumps which to some maybe more soothing...ummmh.....that Guzzi V7 (845cc), looks good.
I get that vibes are a bit subjective which is why I tried to frame the question in relation to other 4-cylinder bikes. The rigidly mounted Z900 is supposed to be very smooth, and so was my GSXS650f, but FZ6 forums had long threads about trying to quell handlebar vibrations. So, are people getting numb hands riding the S750 on the freeway?

Not to go too off topic, but there is just something about a 90 degree V2. The engine can be vibey, which can be visceral and make you feel connected to the bike, without making your hands feel uncomfortable.
 

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Hi Juan1, and Welcome to this Forum.

Yes, I am most probably the person that Jeff mentioned earlier on here.
I went from a 2016 1000 Naked to a 2019 750 and went back again to a 2019 GSX-S1000.
Currently I have a Z900RS and a SV650, the GSXS became a Ninja 1000 SX SE along the way.

The 1000 is better in every way. That included being a much more roomy, (a more comfortable bike in the riding triangle of dimensions, plus a better seat).
The 750 needs to spanked hard to get good performance from the motor, but is let down by the very poor quality of the shock as I say in my linked review I posted up then.

People here knock the shock in the 1000, but the 750's one is worse in terms of being supplied with much too firm compression. The spring is good for my 85 Kg.
For the new price of a 750 + new quality rear shock = just buy a 1000. Your better off in the long run.

You ask how are vibrations? Both 750 and 1000 are very good, no complaints there. The 750, being a 4 cyl inline motored bike will feel like smooth silk compared to a Ducati S2R.
And the clutch, while not a slipper one, is night and day light, compared to the super application pressure needed on the ancient Ducati.
I rode one once when they were new on the Market, and I hope I never have to ride one again as the very strong hand grip needed clutch lever pressure would prevent that happening now.

The Guzzi would be a comparable Riders' bike to the GSX-S750, I would expect based on reviews I've seen on line of current model 750 & 850 Guzzi bikes that have benefited from Aprilla ownership.
The fact always comes back that the 750 GSX-S is a very budget bike that today sells on it's looks, rather than new technology and development.

Rob.

Link : GSX-S 750 3000 KM Review
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Thanks for the post! You may have ridden a non-S2R800 Monster as the s2r800 has a slipper clutch actuated by a hydraulic master cylinder. The action is pretty light. The rest of my S2r has had loads of work done to it by the previous owner. Ohlins forks and shock, bigger brakes, rearsets, carbon fiber parts, high clip ons, full exhaust, etc...

Yep, the new small blocks are better thanks to Piaggio. While I love the 1200cc Norge, I don't have time for long distance riding and hence me looking at a new commuter/occasional canyon carver. The charm with the old big blocks was their simplicity. Add a starter relay, adjust the easy-to-access valves, and the bike will go forever.
 

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I friend of mine son has a 2016 GSX-S750 White. IMO is the best feeling bike I've ever rode. It told me everything that was happening, very confident inspiring for me!! Here we are at the Deals Gap on foothills parkway.
Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire Automotive lighting
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Hi Juan1, and Welcome to this Forum.

The 1000 is better in every way. That included being a much more roomy, (a more comfortable bike in the riding triangle of dimensions, plus a better seat).
The 750 needs to spanked hard to get good performance from the motor, but is let down by the very poor quality of the shock as I say in my linked review I posted up then.

People here knock the shock in the 1000, but the 750's one is worse in terms of being supplied with much too firm compression. The spring is good for my 85 Kg.
For the new price of a 750 + new quality rear shock = just buy a 1000. Your better off in the long run.

The Guzzi would be a comparable Riders' bike to the GSX-S750, I would expect based on reviews I've seen on line of current model 750 & 850 Guzzi bikes that have benefited from Aprilla ownership.
Link : GSX-S 750 3000 KM Review
I guess my confusion comes from this. You state the shock is really bad on the s750. The Motorcycle.com, Motoradd, and MC Commute reviews all praise the handling of the GSX-S750. I have no doubt the shock is imperfect at the 'zook's $8k price point, but is it that bad? The best handling bike for the canyons I've owned is a '18 SV650 with emulators and a GSXR shock. It was better for me than the fully adjustable Italian bikes I've owned, so I love that you have an SV in your garage.

I hope the S750 is a better rider's bike than the Guzzis. Moto Guzzis have wonderful character, but tend to be either too heavy (the big blocks), or too spindly (the small blocks) to be great peg scrapers.
 

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I've been thinking very seriously about selling my old Monster S2R800 and Guzzi Norge and buying a reliable do-it-all bike that does well in the canyons. First, a few questions:

1. How bad are the vibes? I've owned two FZ6's and sold both because the I4 tingle made my hands go numb - loved those bikes otherwise. Conversely, I once had a GSX650F that had the smoothest engine I've experienced. Where does the GSX-S750 fall on that scale? Test rode an XSR900 and thought the vibes were OK, but would become tiresome after an hour.

2. What is the general ownership experience like? Love my Italian bikes, but I'd rather spend time with my kid than replace timing belts again. Fun fact: The Guzzi uses the same belt as a mid-90's Subaru Justy. Who says Guzzi uses old tech?

3. Are any shock swaps possible? Loved my SV650 with emulators and a GSXR shock. Once dialed in, that thing out-handled my Monster.
Hi I’ve just bought a gsx s 750 after owning r1’s cbr gsxr and ninja sportsbikes.
I think this bike is fantastic!! Great engine with loads of grunt and the upright bars allow me to chick the bike all over the place with ease.
very reliable, comfortable on long rides a great do it all bike
 
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