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Discussion Starter #1
As the title suggests ; with the lid off for 2 hours

how quickly does the fluid absorb moisture?

can you use fluid if the cap is left off for a few hours?

Motul 660 , wet boiling point is 205° , dot 4 standard is 155°

can't find anything online yet.

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If it hasn't been rained, forget and just replace it every 2 years, as manual says. Hardly imagine fluid absorbs moisute that fast.

DOT 4 is 230deg when it is "dry" and 150 deg after getting moisture.

If you are really worry about it, just go to a service and test your breaking fluid quality.

45303

If there is no service with the tester, you can buy it, price starting from 10€ in my coutry.

By additional 20€ you can simply replace the fluid, I guess.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If it hasn't been rained, forget and just replace it every 2 years, as manual says. Hardly imagine fluid absorbs moisute that fast.

DOT 4 is 230deg when it is "dry" and 150 deg after getting moisture.

If you are really worry about it, just go to a service and test your breaking fluid quality.

View attachment 45303
If there is no service with the tester, you can buy it, price starting from 10€ in my coutry.

By additional 20€ you can simply replace the fluid, I guess.
I'm replacing the lines , I had air issues & in bleeding the brakes I've emptied 500ml of new fluid into an old container but this took a few hours so lid was off

i want to know if I can reuse this fluid

Thanks for responding
 

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I would reccomend to spent 10€ and purchase new fluid to prevent any further issues:
1. dust in lines
2. water in lines
3. you will be calm next few years and no any regrets or worries wont disturb you ;)

remember, breaking fluid is aggressive and might cause damages of paint or plastic.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I would reccomend to spent 10€ and purchase new fluid to prevent any further issues:
1. dust in lines
2. water in lines
3. you will be calm next few years and no any regrets or worries wont disturb you ;)

remember, breaking fluid is aggressive and might cause damages of paint or plastic.
Nice one , i brought some 5.1 (that was all they had) just incase , just have essentially new fluid sitting here & it now has to be binned 😂 your right about dust though

I'll use the new fluid

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Throwing away brake fluid because the bottle has been opened is one of my pet peeves. It's complete B.S. Utter B.S. B.S. of an epic nature. It had to have come from brake fluid mfgs.

Let's say it's done not to sell more brake fluid but out of an abundance of caution. Hard to argue against that though a couple million gallons of wasted brake fluid is an argument as well.

But electronic brake fluid testers are actually quite cheap now. And you can even use a regular voltmeter. So there's really no reason to leave anything to chance.

About 3.5% water is the replacement point. So if you have an open bottle just test it. Every single time I've done this (many dozens by now) it's been fine. I seal the cap well and water doesn't magically go through the plastic at any great rate.

And having higher levels of water is not going to cause catastrophic brake failure at any rate. Maybe if you're actually on the race track or spending days zipping through alpine passes but not in routine riding. Airborne dust particles are in no way going to pollute the fluid unless you left it uncovered in a cement plant.

It's purely a transfer medium, you could use vegetable oil like bicycle do and it would work. It's really just about raising the boiling point.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Throwing away brake fluid because the bottle has been opened is one of my pet peeves. It's complete B.S. Utter B.S. B.S. of an epic nature. It had to have come from brake fluid mfgs.

Let's say it's done not to sell more brake fluid but out of an abundance of caution. Hard to argue against that though a couple million gallons of wasted brake fluid is an argument as well.

But electronic brake fluid testers are actually quite cheap now. And you can even use a regular voltmeter. So there's really no reason to leave anything to chance.

About 3.5% water is the replacement point. So if you have an open bottle just test it. Every single time I've done this (many dozens by now) it's been fine. I seal the cap well and water doesn't magically go through the plastic at any great rate.

And having higher levels of water is not going to cause catastrophic brake failure at any rate. Maybe if you're actually on the race track or spending days zipping through alpine passes but not in routine riding. Airborne dust particles are in no way going to pollute the fluid unless you left it uncovered in a cement plant.

It's purely a transfer medium, you could use vegetable oil like bicycle do and it would work. It's really just about raising the boiling point.
if you read what I wrote then you'll realise that your argument is incorrect.

water through plastic? I was bleeding new fluid through the system & had air leaks (no realise I didn't have the lines tight enough - due to mot wanting to overtighten) therefore the cap was off the fresh fluid for hours

I work in a garden not a garage

it's spring & all sorts of sh1te in the air ; forget screwing over brand new lines or having any braking issues while riding - not toying with my life over other peoples "peeves" or irrelevant particulars
 

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I was referring to the plastic bottles brake fluid usually comes in, not your situation in particular.

There is nothing in the spring air that will screw over brake lines. You are of course free to change your brake fluid every other day and piss as much of your money away as you like. But you asked a question and I gave some relevant perspective from 40 years of working on bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I was referring to the plastic bottles brake fluid usually comes in, not your situation in particular.

But you asked a question and I gave some relevant perspective from 40 years of working on bikes.
👍🏽

You are of course free to change your brake fluid every other day and piss as much of your money away as you like.
🍻
 
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