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Discussion Starter #1
Moto Dudes, Popular writer John Burns in his recent on-line article (motorcycle.com) seems to insinuate the break in period is a tad redundant and overly conservative. I've been trying to abide mostly to the rpm limits in the manual, but wonder if its really necessary after seeing Burns' article. Back a hundred years ago my FJ1100 was drag raced after only 500 miles, but have none of those plans for Mr. Sazook .:)
 

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Moto Dudes, Popular writer John Burns in his recent on-line article (motorcycle.com) seems to insinuate the break in period is a tad redundant and overly conservative. I've been trying to abide mostly to the rpm limits in the manual, but wonder if its really necessary after seeing Burns' article. Back a hundred years ago my FJ1100 was drag raced after only 500 miles, but have none of those plans for Mr. Sazook .:)
I have to admit I've only got about 100 miles on the clock and I did give it some quick bursts to over 10k rpm and abruptly shut the throttle for plenty of over run... Done the same with my SV1000 with no ill effects..:) I rest my case .... http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
 

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done about 250 now on mine , between working all the time and **** weather cant seem to get out, taking it up to about 6 very very hard not to blast it big time lol, the big test for me is when my lonney mates come out with us no way im going to let them blast of into the sunset lol
 

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I sort of do a hybrid. I would take it to 6-7k RPM in the first 50 miles but briefly, vary the RPMs, let the rings seat...go through all the gears...let the components wear in. Take it up to 6k RPM, engine brake...go through the gears, repeat. Now with a few hundred miles on the clock, I ride how I normally would.

The break in on my Yamaha just stated 'avoid prolonged RPMs above 5600 in the 1st 600 miles. Avoid prolonged RPMs above 6800 from miles 600-1000 miles'

I'm not sure who writes these manuals, mechanics or lawyers.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for input. Tony giving it the stick already :).
L-Jack I know--I can ride like a normal person until I go with one guy in particular (got to love the Ducatisti).
DTM I like that line: manuals by mechanics or lawyers.
 

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It helps to pour 100 grams of metal filings into the oil plug hole. Really knocks those pesky rough edges off of things. Kinda like Solvo soap for your engine.
 

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Just bought mine in Australia from the Suzuki dealership owned by former super sport world champion/world super bike racer Karl Muggeridge. He set up the test bike I rode in person. Asked him about break in as I figured he'd know. He said to take it smoothly but firmly through each gear, not up to red line, and that should do it. No real need to keep it under certain revs, but not to sit at a constant droning speed. It's more about how the engine is revved rather than how high it seems.
 

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Just bought mine in Australia from the Suzuki dealership owned by former super sport world champion/world super bike racer Karl Muggeridge. He set up the test bike I rode in person. Asked him about break in as I figured he'd know. He said to take it smoothly but firmly through each gear, not up to red line, and that should do it. No real need to keep it under certain revs, but not to sit at a constant droning speed. It's more about how the engine is revved rather than how high it seems.
Same here
 

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I think the real answer here is to look at owners of motorcycles. Any and all of us. Heck, lets include cars too. Think of all the forums you visit. Do you see a pattern of motorcycles wearing out? Engines needing rebuild?

Even of you visit the vintage forums, many bikes from the 70's and 80's are still running. Many are seeing their first valve adjustment. Until we can see some "Here, look at this....." as opposed to "I think...." None of the articles show much expect to show these engines are very durable, and very forgiving of any sort of break in.

Back in the 80's, the valve adjustments were supposed to happen every 6000 miles.
 

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It helps to pour 100 grams of metal filings into the oil plug hole. Really knocks those pesky rough edges off of things. Kinda like Solvo soap for your engine.
This really freed up the engine. It does use oil a lot. it that common? ;)
 

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Just do what the manual says. You guys who want to beat the snot out of your bike right out of the crate, be my guest. I'll take the opinion of the engineers who design and build the motor. I see no need to second-guess them.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Ha - funny stuff. Well perhaps I did just step out of the 80s as my previous bike needed a valve adjust every 6000 miles. That was fairly reasonably priced--it was all the other ancillary work that cost the big $$ which is one of the factors the bmer was retired. Anyway, when I bought it, from the salesman to the dealership owner, they all said to ride like it was stolen. The one thing I do recall them recommending was to ride "it in the mountains," which I assumed meant it forced a certain level of trailing throttle which I gather is good for forcing the rings out against the cylinder walls.





So I suppose master Stromer's comment to follow the opinion of the guys that designed it is hard to fault (loved your picture).
 

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Just do what the manual says. You guys who want to beat the snot out of your bike right out of the crate, be my guest. I'll take the opinion of the engineers who design and build the motor. I see no need to second-guess them.
This is my thought as well. Always done so with good result. I may exceed recommendations a bit but try to keep close to what Suzuki says.
 

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A really good question
I personally have always abided by the manufactures recommendations and try to clock the millage up quickly and get the first service out of the way. All new machinery has a run in period (ones that I have personally dealt with have) where all moving parts bed in, after this period minor adjustments are generally made to parts that have changed there position/setting during this period and oil is changed mainly to flush out bits of swarf from the manufacturing process.
Although correct me if im wrong, during your new bikes first service, I don't think that any minor adjustments are made to any moving engine parts, lets say for example the tappits.
i know people that just cant resist the urge to ride their new bikes just the same as their previous bike and I must admit I don't know anyone that has had issues resulting from this.


So having said all that does it really make a difference if you take your revs a little bit higher?
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I REALLY DONT KNOW !!!!!!!!!!
 

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Well, i asked at the Suzuki shop were i bought my Hayabusa and my Gsx s 1000 about break in. He said with new Kawasaki Zx 10r the roadracing guys take the bike new in box from the factory to the circuit and remove lights etc and ride the bike up to redline at once in all gears. This is how they break in.
In the factorys before they put the bikes in boxes, they run the engine up to redline in all gears and let them run on full speed. If they cant handle this they dont send it to the shops. This was words from Suzuki Dealer in Norway.
 

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Well, i asked at the Suzuki shop were i bought my Hayabusa and my Gsx s 1000 about break in. He said with new Kawasaki Zx 10r the roadracing guys take the bike new in box from the factory to the circuit and remove lights etc and ride the bike up to redline at once in all gears. This is how they break in.
In the factorys before they put the bikes in boxes, they run the engine up to redline in all gears and let them run on full speed. If they cant handle this they dont send it to the shops. This was words from Suzuki Dealer in Norway.
Yes quite correct. I watched a video of the Bmw motorcycle assembly plant in munich.
The video showed the finished bike being run on a rolling road and revved hard and to the redline in each gear and held there for 20 seconds. No sympathy for the engine. Once finished it was banged in a crate ready for its poor owner to worry about not exceeding 2k revs for the next 6 months........ Get it ridden hard, and no worries.
 

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Well, i asked at the Suzuki shop were i bought my Hayabusa and my Gsx s 1000 about break in. He said with new Kawasaki Zx 10r the roadracing guys take the bike new in box from the factory to the circuit and remove lights etc and ride the bike up to redline at once in all gears. This is how they break in.
In the factorys before they put the bikes in boxes, they run the engine up to redline in all gears and let them run on full speed. If they cant handle this they dont send it to the shops. This was words from Suzuki Dealer in Norway.
That's one opinion. You'll find many more stating the opposite.
 
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