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Discussion Starter #1
I have never carried a passenger on my bike. According to your experience, what is the best way to start?
7 year old, 50 lbs boy, a 24 year old, 110 lbs daughter, a 40 year old girlfriend, 135 lbs or a 175 lbs ex?

Any tips? :unsure::LOL:

Thanks.
 

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I have never carried a passenger on my bike. According to your experience, what is the best way to start?
7 year old, 50 lbs boy, a 24 year old, 110 lbs daughter, a 40 year old girlfriend, 135 lbs or a 175 lbs ex?

Any tips? :unsure::LOL:

Thanks.
If it's your first time with a passenger, definitely start with the ex, regarless of weight. :)
 

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Not taken a passenger for years now, don't really like doing it but if you are I think better to take one that you will be taking regularly or at least in the future. That way you can get used to changing the spring for ride height etc. Its also better to take someone who has been on the bike before if you have never done it either, perhaps another rider who will not be a nervous first time passenger and will be used to cornering and braking movements.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Not taken a passenger for years now, don't really like doing it but if you are I think better to take one that you will be taking regularly or at least in the future. That way you can get used to changing the spring for ride height etc. Its also better to take someone who has been on the bike before if you have never done it either, perhaps another rider who will not be a nervous first time passenger and will be used to cornering and braking movements.
Thanks for your advice though. This is exactly what we were talking about with my coworkers and there is a lady who rides with her husband all the time, so maybe she can ride with me. The only thing is that my bike is totally different to the one of her husband which is a Harley-Davidson. She weights 125 lbs. In this case, I'm the one nervous already:cry:
 

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Thanks for your advice though. This is exactly what we were talking about with my coworkers and there is a lady who rides with her husband all the time, so maybe she can ride with me. The only thing is that my bike is totally different to the one of her husband which is a Harley-Davidson. She weights 125 lbs. In this case, I'm the one nervous already:cry:
The biggest tip I have is to make sure they don't lean on you. Lots of passengers push on your back too hard and make you put pressure on the bars to hold both of you up which makes slower speed riding harder with less control. Make sure you keep your arms loose and let them know they will have to use their stomach muscles to keep themselves upright. Goon had some good info there too, best to start with a passenger who has ridden before. Good luck and start slow.
 

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Take the one who will listen to what you tell them to do! If the lady from work is willing then that is a great option as it will give you a chance to feel how the bike handles with the extra weight with someone who kniws what to do.

The first person I took as pillion was my now wife and she had years of experience of being a pillion so gave me some good pointers. She is such a great pillion I have been known to touch her leg when we are out on a ride just to make sure she is still there :rolleyes:

Just remember that the bike will be harder to stop, and that rough gear changes could mean a few helmet bumps so keep things smooth and fluid and you will be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The biggest tip I have is to make sure they don't lean on you. Lots of passengers push on your back too hard and make you put pressure on the bars to hold both of you up which makes slower speed riding harder with less control. Make sure you keep your arms loose and let them know they will have to use their stomach muscles to keep themselves upright. Goon had some good info there too, best to start with a passenger who has ridden before. Good luck and start slow.
Thanks Squidbilly, great tips, I'll keep them in mind. So far no one that I asked has volunteered because I'm a new rider and they think that ridding in a motorcycle it dying for sure. :LOL:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Take the one who will listen to what you tell them to do!
This is an excellent point! Good catch!

If the lady from work is willing then that is a great option as it will give you a chance to feel how the bike handles with the extra weight with someone who kniws what to do.
Problem is when? She is too busy. Ey, I'll have to look for the opportunity.

The first person I took as pillion was my now wife and she had years of experience of being a pillion so gave me some good pointers. She is such a great pillion I have been known to touch her leg when we are out on a ride just to make sure she is still there :rolleyes:
Good for you! Your a lucky man to have a wife that adventurous and not afraid of motorcycles!

Just remember that the bike will be harder to stop, and that rough gear changes could mean a few helmet bumps so keep things smooth and fluid and you will be fine.
Thanks for your advice! Thanks for sharing your unique experience with all of us!(y)
 

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And remember that todays bikes are not as pillion friendly as the older 1970s machines that had flat seats and parallel footrests the modern stuff has seats up in the air and pegs that make your knees tuck under your armpits. Best to take your pillion to an empty factory or shopping centre carpark and do some slow manouvres etc, practice getting on and off safely and steadily before you venture into traffic. It will take time for both of you to learn the balance of the bike too.
 

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Thanks Squidbilly, great tips, I'll keep them in mind. So far no one that I asked has volunteered because I'm a new rider and they think that ridding in a motorcycle it dying for sure. :LOL:
No problem, John. Not sure how long you have been riding, but I didn't feel comfortable taking passengers for my 1st year of riding. I wanted to be able to control the bike like an extension of myself before I put other people's lives at risk. Now, over 2 decades later and I still prefer not to have a pillion unless I have to (or if it is a woman I am trying to romance...). Too much can go wrong, and people love to sue these days. Everything is fine, until you t-bone someone and your passenger sues you for hospital bills, time off work, emotional distress, etc, etc, etc... Good luck and be safe out there.
 

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First, don't give the Ex a ride until you've perfected your wheelie launches. For the others just crank up the preload appropriately and remember to keep things at 5 10ths with a passenger. The dynamics of the bike will be quite different. Make sure they know the rules for passengers, stay balanced, lean with the driver, never on or off except when you tell them you are ready, particularly with the young fella... Even just 50lbs suddenly thrown to one side as you are pulling to a stop can have unpleasant consequences.
 

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Great ideas; but please do not share too much 🤫🤫. I told my wife the bike was for solo riding only (removed & sold passenger pegs) 😉😉. Don’t want this getting back to her 🤣🤣.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
My biggest fear is when I come to a red light! How am I going to stop, dealing now with the bike's weight, my weight and the passenger weight? I'm almost tippy-toes and I don't have a 6' 5" guy legs! :unsure:
 

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My biggest fear is when I come to a red light! How am I going to stop, dealing now with the bike's weight, my weight and the passenger weight? I'm almost tippy-toes and I don't have a 6' 5" guy legs! :unsure:
That's only a small problem..... *boom tish

In seriousness, take it slow and easy. Start somewhere quiet and do stop starts and u turns. Build some confidence.
As with learning to ride for the first time, it's easier to find stability when at speed, everything is much harder when you're moving slowly. Drag the rear brake and use it to keep balance when moving slowly or doing u turns. Confidence is key.
 

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My biggest fear is when I come to a red light! How am I going to stop, dealing now with the bike's weight, my weight and the passenger weight? I'm almost tippy-toes and I don't have a 6' 5" guy legs! :unsure:
If the passenger holds themselves up and doesn't plow into your back or lean from side to side as you come to a stop, it's really not a big deal. The extra weight from the passenger should lower the bike a bit too, helping with reach a bit. I have no problems on the GSXS with reach, but I have been on some tall bikes and could only get 1 leg down. I would be hesitant to carry a passenger on a really tall bike unless I was an experienced rider, familiar with the bike, and had an experienced passenger too.

I would strongly recommend you being extremely comfortable on the bike before you take a passenger, regardless if you can touch with both feet or not. You don't want to be practicing technique with a pillion on a ride somewhere. Someone recommended a parking lot and that would be a great place to start with a person on the back- as the passenger needs to get a bit of practice as well if they have never ridden before.

Make your pillion wear a helmet, and remember that there are no do-overs with motorcycling. Luck favors the prepared.
 

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Just throw caution to the wind, get them on and go for it. I certainly never worryed before I got my wife on my fireblade, minutes after handing over 8k for it. I drove 180miles home down some of the busiest roads in the uk on a Friday evening. Its second nature if you can ride. The more you think about it will instill fear in your confidence.

The only advice I will give if you are short like me......when they get on make sure the ground is as flat as possible or at least perpendicular to the bike ie, as if you are going up or down a hill, just makes it easier. If the pillion does throw there weight or they are big boned, as they get on it might try to make the bike lean one way or another, if you are sideways on the drive the bike will lean a long way before you foot touches the ground.
Hold the front brake on too.

The rest you will learn as you go, once you brake hard a couple of times and their helmet smashes the back of yours you will learn to be smoother

Sent from my POCOPHONE F1 using Tapatalk
 

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Prep them for a short ride. Just around the block to see if both you and them like it. Honestly, the gsxs is not a fun bike to be on for the passenger. More of a solo bike. My gf hates it. I agree as even though she is a great passenger the gsxs does lean its butt forward more than most. Not too comfortable for me either with a passenger, regardless I always find the passenger coming up on me. your son will love it. Come on a ride on a rocket ship, lol. Daughter will probably not mind as much, but adults probably not going to be fans of the tiny seat and lean.
After several tries with the gf I gave up, not comfortable for either of us. On the other hand I don’t even know she is on my Bonneville. We can ride hours and still be fresh.

Good luck and enjoy!
 

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Just throw caution to the wind, get them on and go for it. I certainly never worryed before I got my wife on my fireblade, minutes after handing over 8k for it. I drove 180miles home down some of the busiest roads in the uk on a Friday evening. Its second nature if you can ride. The more you think about it will instill fear in your confidence.

The only advice I will give if you are short like me......when they get on make sure the ground is as flat as possible or at least perpendicular to the bike ie, as if you are going up or down a hill, just makes it easier. If the pillion does throw there weight or they are big boned, as they get on it might try to make the bike lean one way or another, if you are sideways on the drive the bike will lean a long way before you foot touches the ground.
Hold the front brake on too.

The rest you will learn as you go, once you brake hard a couple of times and their helmet smashes the back of yours you will learn to be smoother

Sent from my POCOPHONE F1 using Tapatalk
I'm no safety nazi by any means and I ride just as fast as the next guy, but this sounds like a horrible idea. @Doddy666, I felt exactly like this; when I was 18 and invincible. Also the roads were a lot different 25 years ago when I started out. Now everyone drives insanely fast, at least in my city. I routinely have people try to sideswipe me and pull out in front of me. To the OP; dont be scared, just use common sense and a little practice. What's the harm in that?
 
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