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Discussion Starter #1
I realized tonight the chain had gotten slack so I set out to do a quick adjustment. Well, I should have known... All went well until I tried to use my Motion Pro adjustment tool to align the rear wheel. Couldn't see it very well on the top run of the chain so I decided to remove the chain guard as I do on other bikes when aligning (usually less than a minute to do). I swear, after dealing with the fairings and now this, the Suzuki engineers must have had daily contests to see who could make the most simple things the biggest PITA. The chain guard apparently is not designed to be removed - it has a push pin fastener on the inside part that's nearly inaccessible and a bolt on the inside of the swingarm with about 3/4" clearance to the rear sprocket. I used a ratcheting box end wrench to start removing it, then realized too late the bolt had come out so far as to hold the wrench captive between the bolt head and sprocket. I was able to remove the axle nut and gently pry out the swingarm to get enough clearance to remove the wrench. I cut a hunk of the plastic out so it was a slot instead of a hold and I can just snap it in and out now. In hindsight, I realized I might could just clamp the alignment tool to the bottom of the sprocket instead of the top. I'd have to get my face down on the ground to see it though. Going to look into one of those laser alignment tools by Profi.

Manual says 20 - 30mm chain slack and I set it at a little over 25mm, could maybe call it 30mm if I pushed a little harder than I normally would. On the side stand the suspension is compressed little if any so when I sit on the bike there is very little slack. Does anyone know how far into the rear suspension travel the sprockets and pivot are in-line for maximum tension? What are you setting your slack to? On the V-stroms the general recommendation is at the maximum slack or even a little more, but not sure if that carries over to this bike.

For the alignment the swingarm marks ended up being pretty close, only about 1/2 the width of a mark off. I just don't trust them, though, as the hole in that rectangular piece is much larger than the axle, which could move a little when you tighten the nut. Speaking of the nut, there have been cases of the nut galling on the axle on V-stroms, so I applied anti-seize and reduced torque to around 60 lb-ft to compensate for the lubrication.
 

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Take this with a grain of salt since I haven't tried it yet, but I noticed the same issue with the chain guard. With other bikes in the past, I've just taken a straight edge and held it against the rear sprocket to check alignment. My plan for the GSXS is to get a straight piece of 1/4 inch rod for the straight edge and lightly hold it against the rear sprocket just below the top run of chain. You have to make sure the back of the rod is on the raised outer part of the sprocket, but outside of that it should work just like the alignment tool. The downside to this method is that you have to check alignment, then adjust, then check alignment, then adjust until you get it right.
 

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I have the Profi Cat Laser tool and the Motion Pro. I haven't used either on the GXS-S yet. I can attest that the Profi, although a little pricey, is a nifty little tool and on my other bikes was more accurate and easier to use than the Motion Pro. I'll check it on the GSX-S today (if I get a chance) to see if it works and let you know.
 

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I just checked my chain using the Profi Cat and it works well on the bottom run, My chain seems to be in alignment from the factory (I haven't adjusted my chain tension yet).
 

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2 ,8 foot long fluorescent tubes attached to each side of rear tire with a bung... wrap bungy around both bulbs tire in middle of course. bulb on each side of tire....measure space between front tire and bulb on both sides...every little turn of rear adjuster you will see difference of measurement at front tire............or just give each side a equil amount of turn an call it a done
 

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I'm not rich by any means, but I can afford a Profi Cat, and it is WAY less work (I checked mine today in less than a minute), it does the job, and I don't have to keep unbroken fluorescent tubes around (really? ...what a pain in the a$$).
:)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
With my clumsiness, all that steel on the bike and the concrete floor, it would be about 10 seconds before I had shattered glass everywhere.
 

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Have never done anything special to line up the rear wheel. My old bike, Z750 from 2004 got 37.000km from the first chain kit. So i believe its ok ;)
 

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Have never done anything special to line up the rear wheel. My old bike, Z750 from 2004 got 37.000km from the first chain kit. So i believe its ok ;)


Been riding bikes for 30 years, I have only ever used the swing arm marks and never had a problem.
 

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I just used the marks on the swing arm. That's what they are for. Thousands of miles later the chain is still on.
Same, mine are pretty spot on, both are on the 3rd notch and my wheel alignment is **** near perfect. I adjusted my chain at 300 miles and haven't touched it since. Coming up on 4k miles and maybe half of them were riding it pretty hard, chain hasn't loosened at all.

I don't really check slack though, if it comes just short of touching the slider on the bottom of the swingarm when pushing it up that's perfect in my opinion. A little loose is way, way better than even a little too tight. If it looks really slack when parked, that's about the only time I'll ever check on slack.
 

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same here....just took a fast look at my beast and see no swing arm adjustment marks....
The marks are by the blocks that hold the rear axle in place. They're just little notches.

 

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Discussion Starter #16
Mine ended up being only about 1/32" or about half the width of a mark off from side to side. I'll admit most all my bikes have been close enough with the marks that just going by them would probably be acceptable, but I do like to verify it. I'm not sure being a little off would be anything one would notice - maybe cause the chain and sprockets to wear faster.

The hole in that rectangular adjusting piece is a good bit larger than the axle, so it is possible the axle could move in when tightening without changing the indicated position. That's why I think it's important to wedge something between the chain and sprocket to put tension on the chain (to pull the wheel towards the front of the bike firmly on the adjusters) before tightening the axle nut.
 

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I showed my friend the motion pro chain adjuster, because he loves motion pro and is OCD about bike up keep. He wants their $80 tire pressure gauge (no idea why). And he commented, wow that must be for people who are OCD about chain maintenance. I wanted to say, so why don't you have one?Haha. I think it is pretty neat. I may pick one up for the future. Its only $12 bucks.
 
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I showed my friend the motion pro chain adjuster, because he loves motion pro and is OCD about bike up keep. He wants their $80 tire pressure gauge (no idea why). And he commented, wow that must be for people who are OCD about chain maintenance. I wanted to say, so why don't you have one?Haha. I think it is pretty neat. I may pick one up for the future. Its only $12 bucks.
It's definitely a handy little tool and when I used the Profi Cat, it just proved to me that the Motion Pro is probably plenty good. The Profi Cat is just a little more convenient (and higher "cool" factor), but hardly worth the cost.
 
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