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Discussion Starter #1
wow that is so much easier to sort out than on the gladius took all of 2 mins.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
the alignment marks and then eye balling it too 36mm socket is also massive
 

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the alignment marks and then eye balling it too 36mm socket is also massive
Already had the big metric socket for previous bikes. OK, another question for anyone......I have read that swing-arm alignment marks are not always accurate on some bikes. Does anyone have reason to doubt the accuracy of the marks on our Suzukis? If the marks are not perfectly accurate, are they close enough for most riders? I understand that the laser alignment method is the best and I would assume that the factory used laser alignment went assembling the bike, but I may be wrong. When I made the first chain slack adjustment on my bike, I noticed that the factory settings of the axle adjusters did not align exactly the same on each side. That being said, the question is, was it improperly aligned from the factory or are the alignment marks on the swing-arm inaccurate?
 

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I've used a home built laser alignment tool since 2003. It's not that I don't necessarily trust chain tensioning methods on bikes but small errors can cause significant misalignment. Also, you can't expect tyre replacement outfits to be as fussy as the bike owner.

It all comes down to the fact that if you can't measure it accurately, you don't know!

Takes about 15 minutes with my setup to do an alignment. The current offset between the parallel wheels on the Suzuki is 4mm. I figure that this is close enough without getting too anal and spending inordinate amounts of time to get it spot on.
 

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Can do this, visually, or get a good idea of where its at if you have a rear stand.

Get down on your knees, and watch the rear sprocket. Notice how the chain has some side-to-side play as it lands on the sprocket and turns. If all is good, the chain should have just a slight amount of slop in each direction. You'll see it, instantly, if its hitting one side or the other more.

If you really think about it, thats what your after.

And a just a CH loose is way, way better than a little tight.
 

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Another issue regarding measuring chain slack. Every YouTube video that I have watched on chain adjustment shows some guy simply pushing up on the chain at the mid-point of the lower run and measuring the distance that it moved. However, the Owner's Manual and the Service Manual for a GSX S1000 shows that the measurement is taken starting with the chain pulled down to maximum deflection and then pushed up to maximum deflection. Depending on how tight the chain is, there can be around 6 mm difference in the YouTube method versus the Owner/Service Manual method. That is a lot. Any opinions?
 

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Machining tolerances today are very close, but to be sure I always check with the old string line around the wheels, this will confirm if the alignment marks on each side of the swing arm are correct, so you'll know for next time. To adjust the chain, put the bike on the side stand & in neutral. Take a measurement of the sprocket centres & note the half way mark. At this point on the chain hook your tape measure over the top of the chain while holding the body of the tape on the floor, next push the chain up taking out the slack & hold the tape in that position with your left hand, now press the chain down & read the slack from where the top of the chain crosses the tape measure. I tend to run on the loose side, & I also find after setting it up properly I push the chain up & it just touches the swing arm slider, so I use this as a quick check as to wether it actually needs adjustment or not. Go well.
 

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Nobody checks for tight spots in the chain then?
The chain should be adjusted at its tightest spot not slackest.
As for alignement i just use the manufacturers marks on the swingarm.
 

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I should have never used the "CH" expression, sorry, because I cannot explain what it is and/or remain a forum member. If you are ever around old mechanics or carpenters, this "hair""measurement means everything.

Think of chain tension like this. The chain will be its tightest when the swing-arm is level. This happens when you sit on the bike, or hit a bump. A bump may make it angles up. Think maximum distance between sprockets.

madmartin mentioned....tight spots. Yes, you are right, but theres no reason to run so tight this becomes a factor. Especially in a new chain like we have here. You should not have any spot significantly different.

For sure , keep it aligned, but its better to run at the maximum amount of up/down play vs the minimum. If you keep it midway-maximum, it will just stay there. You'll adjust at tire changes.

Notice the droop in this chain. Its a dirt bike, so the effect is exaggerated. If this bike were mine, I'd probably loosen the chain, but its very close to correct. Think of his swingarm being level with the ground, and it makes sense. We can get by with less slack than this bike has, but our machines would function just fine with a chain this loose.

http://all-moto-brands.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/crf-450-honda-1.jpg
 

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Hi Guys ,

I had my bike serviced twice now by the dealer , who only adjusts alignment by swing arm marks . I can tell you that while am sure machine tolerances are much better these days , I hate riding my bike now as the front handle bars slightly wobble , and pulls the the right constantly . While conering the back end feels like it is crabbing and thus not the safest feeling in the world .


Dealer doesn't care as they are following the manual , and no where here does laser alignment .


I would do the string however I do not really understand the method :(
 

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Hi Guys ,

I had my bike serviced twice now by the dealer , who only adjusts alignment by swing arm marks . I can tell you that while am sure machine tolerances are much better these days , I hate riding my bike now as the front handle bars slightly wobble , and pulls the the right constantly . While conering the back end feels like it is crabbing and thus not the safest feeling in the world .


Dealer doesn't care as they are following the manual , and no where here does laser alignment .
(
I try to avoid the dealers touching my bike.
 
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