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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I recently bleed the brakes on my 2016 GSX-S1000 ABS, however I still have the same feeling on the brake lever.

Compared to other bikes that I owned in the past, there is definitely a greater amount of travel before the brakes take action.

I don't know if this is by design or not but my next thought was to replace the master cylinder with something like Brembo 19RCS, but before wasting money on this I wanted to read opinions on this matter.

I heard rumors that even replacing the brake lines and master cylinder the "issue" persists which I found a bit weird.


Thank you.
 

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I replaced the lines with Core steel lines and bled. Lever action is like a rock, only a small amount of travel before it engages. I think it is safe to say you still have air in the lines. Did you see the bleed nipple at the MC itself? That is the last one to bleed. Sometimes removing the MC from the bar, turn it upside down and tap on it and the lines with the butt end of a screw driver while bleeding works to un-lodge any trapped bubbles. I doubt if your stock MC is the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
bleed order:

MC
LEFT CLP
RIGHT CLP
MC

PhuketPaul,

I did not use a vacuum bleeder but I can get one and see if makes a difference, however I need to mention that everything is stock on my bike. Did you see better results with the vacuum bleeder when your bike was all stock?
 

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I got a firmer lever using the vacuum bleeder when my bike was stock, but I still wasn't happy with the brakes.

In order of improvement I did pads, lines and radial master, they all helped but the pads made the biggest difference and were the cheapest.

A slightly soft lever didn't seem to matter so much when the pads actually had some bite!
 

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Perhaps Suzuki were already aware of this.
Quote from a Suzi Company site :"The front brake hose has been updated for MY18 for improved initial stopping performance and feeling".

Rob.
 

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As said above by Paul, Vacuum bleeder is the best option on a bike. I've very rarely achieved a really good lever feel by pump bleeding. Always get a good lever feel if it's been vacuum bled.
 

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btw, does the vacuum bleeder needs to be one of those electric ones or one with a pump should do the work?
Don't know to be honest, all the ones I've used work off compressed air from a compressor
I've used a hand pump vacuum one before, may be better result than pumping the brake lever, but I'd say more of a pain in the ass. I'd assume one using a compressor works off Venturi and is unlikely to flood and suffer damage, not the case with my hand pump. Have to pull the hose and drain it frequently; if fluid gets pulled into the pump, have to disassemble and clean it. With an electric one, I'd be weary, it's simpler and more efficient to make a direct vacuum (pump air out to pull air in) rather than Venturi (push air past an adjacent tube creating a relative pressure difference that pulls air from the adjacent tube). If it's a cheap electric pump, I'd bet it's NOT Venturi, and you risk pulling brake fluid into the pump.
 

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I've used a hand pump vacuum one before, may be better result than pumping the brake lever, but I'd say more of a pain in the ass. With an electric one, I'd be weary, it's simpler and more efficient to make a direct vacuum (pump air out to pull air in) rather than Venturi (push air past an adjacent tube creating a relative pressure difference that pulls air from the adjacent tube)..
I would have thought you would be more weary using a hand pump, but perhaps more wary using an electric pump ;)
 

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I had the same issue...lots of travel before engaging and spongy lever. I bled probably almost a quart of fluid, and tied down the lever for a few hours. I think I used a Mity Vac or something as well. It eventually helped the sponginess but the travel is still a little more than I think it should be. If it isn't spongy, I don't think there would be air that would affect the initial travel - I think that's just the nature of it. Not a problem for me, just takes a few stops to get used to it after I've been on the V-strom. I also installed Vesrah pads and Pazzo levers. If I had to do it over, I think I would get the Pazzo shorties like I have on the Strom.
 

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I hated my brakes. I bled them, had the dealer bleed them and they never got better. So, my last ditch was trying more expensive levers.
BINGO! These Puig levers have a set screw that lets you adjust where the brakes start to bite. They work very well. You also need the Puig perch, so, not an inexpensive way to go. However, I think it's some of the best money I've spent on the bike so far. I'm ordering some for my Street Triple.
 

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I hated my brakes. I bled them, had the dealer bleed them and they never got better. So, my last ditch was trying more expensive levers.
BINGO! These Puig levers have a set screw that lets you adjust where the brakes start to bite. They work very well. You also need the Puig perch, so, not an inexpensive way to go. However, I think it's some of the best money I've spent on the bike so far. I'm ordering some for my Street Triple.
Can't see any sign or mention of a screw, just the lever for adjusting the distance from the bars to the lever, where is this adjusting/preloading screw?
 

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Bemil, a couple of questions: When you say it has a set screw, that's separate from the adjuster that moves the lever toward or away from the grip? I assume this screw would actually "preload" the pushrod on master cylinder piston?

You would need the lever you linked, and then this part? The total price is comparable to the Pazzo levers.

https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/puig-brake-lever-mount-suzuki-triumph-bmw?rrec=true
Can't see any sign or mention of a screw, just the lever for adjusting the distance from the bars to the lever, where is this adjusting/preloading screw?
I will take a picture of the set screw location and post it. Yes, you do need the lever and the perch. When I ordered the levers I had no idea they had this adjustment. I discovered it reading the installation instructions.
G-Dub, it doesn't move the lever closer or away from the grip, it moves the set screw, which comes into contact with the mastercylinder pushrod, closer or further from the pushrod.
It works! I had trouble trail braking with the way it came from Suzuki.
 

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Dry sticky caliper pistons and dust seals.

Instead of the pistons/s sliding through the dust seals the piston grips the seal stretching it out when the brakes are applied. When the brakes are released the stretched out dust seal then acts like a return spring pulling the piston (and in turn pads) away from the rotor.

That excessive travel is this clearance having to be taken up before the pads again make contact.

Overhaul calipers every pad change, and lubricate polished pistons and new seals with an appropriate silicone grease upon assembly. Do NOT use brake fluid. It is water soluble and will completely wash away in the first shower of rain.
 
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