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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone had the GSX-S1000's front fork dampening revalved, or replaced the front forks altogether? I replaced the rear shock and it helped immensely on the rear, but now the front forks feel like they have way too much compression dampening whenever going over roads with a very irregular (bumpy) surface. It seems as though the forks momentarily hydraulic lock. I grit my teeth and tense up knowing I'm about to get hammered through the bars.

I road a 2017 Tuono Factory with Ohlins suspension about a month ago and the difference in ability and level of confidence to tackle rough roads is unreal between that bike and the GSX-S1000. The Aprilia felt wholly composed, the suspension soaked up the bumps almost as though they weren't there. I have ridden the GSX-S1000 through the same section of road on which I tested the Aprilia, but it is nowhere near as confidence inspiring as the Aprilia. The Aprilia's suspension floated over the bumps and the bike felt like it was glued to the road surface.

So fellow GSX-S1000 riders how did you improve the front fork performance on your bike?

Cheers
 

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I actually find my bike quite compliant. I have left it standard but have adjusted for my riding weight and style the correct sag figures, and then fine tune adjusted my compression and rebound accordingly.
��I think comparing to another bike or suspension is unfair. Perhaps a better comparison would be a Suzuki GSXS 1000 with Ohlins forks (and properly set up for you) would be a better comparison. However when you start comparing stock suspension that Suzuki has on this bike to full blown Ohlins well it's like comparing chalk and cheese - unfair. Of course you get what you pay for.
Just my view
Jeffro
 

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Trade it in pay 5k more and get the Tuono

Has anyone had the GSX-S1000's front fork dampening revalved, or replaced the front forks altogether? I replaced the rear shock and it helped immensely on the rear, but now the front forks feel like they have way too much compression dampening whenever going over roads with a very irregular (bumpy) surface. It seems as though the forks momentarily hydraulic lock. I grit my teeth and tense up knowing I'm about to get hammered through the bars.

I road a 2017 Tuono Factory with Ohlins suspension about a month ago and the difference in ability and level of confidence to tackle rough roads is unreal between that bike and the GSX-S1000. The Aprilia felt wholly composed, the suspension soaked up the bumps almost as though they weren't there. I have ridden the GSX-S1000 through the same section of road on which I tested the Aprilia, but it is nowhere near as confidence inspiring as the Aprilia. The Aprilia's suspension floated over the bumps and the bike felt like it was glued to the road surface.

So fellow GSX-S1000 riders how did you improve the front fork performance on your bike?

Cheers
We get different bikes for different reasons (all bikes are good).

Instead of spending money upgrading this one, why not get the Tuono?
I agree......................bad ass bike, accidentally came out of a corner in a power wheelie a couple of years ago and it stayed in perfect line (not a care in the world)
Try the RSV4 much more comfy seat.

Just remember that there aren't that many real qualified mechanics to take care of all the little problems that they have & need a lot more TLC vs. Suzuki.;)
 

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Has anyone had the GSX-S1000's front fork dampening revalved, or replaced the front forks altogether? I replaced the rear shock and it helped immensely on the rear, but now the front forks feel like they have way too much compression dampening whenever going over roads with a very irregular (bumpy) surface. It seems as though the forks momentarily hydraulic lock. I grit my teeth and tense up knowing I'm about to get hammered through the bars.

I road a 2017 Tuono Factory with Ohlins suspension about a month ago and the difference in ability and level of confidence to tackle rough roads is unreal between that bike and the GSX-S1000. The Aprilia felt wholly composed, the suspension soaked up the bumps almost as though they weren't there. I have ridden the GSX-S1000 through the same section of road on which I tested the Aprilia, but it is nowhere near as confidence inspiring as the Aprilia. The Aprilia's suspension floated over the bumps and the bike felt like it was glued to the road surface.

So fellow GSX-S1000 riders how did you improve the front fork performance on your bike?

Cheers
You don't say how you've set the front rebound and compression damping. Do you still get a harsh ride if your wind both adjusters right out? Slow rebound damping will give a new identical harsh ride to excessive compression damping on bad roads. Overweight springs for the riders weight/riding conditions similarly.

The only way I've ever been able to set compression damping is to first take both compression and rebound completely out of the equation by backing both right off. Then bring rebound up till you get the ride you want on rough roads, and only then bring up compression damping. By setting rebound correctly first you know any harshness as you increase compression damping is in fact due to that adjustment alone.

P.S. another advantage of screwing the front right back on both compression and rebound is to make sure the harshness is actually coming from the front. Don't know about other people but I have difficult tell which end is causing a harsh ride. For that reason I make sure the rear is set how I want it prior to bringing up front adjustments.
 

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As you said in your post, by replacing the rear shock things got better back there. I bet the new shock is set up for your weight. I think the GSX-s1000 is a great bike to start with but some of the value savings suzuki applied is in the suspension....with that said its all about home much your willing to spend.

1. New springs for your weight...$150 to $200...This makes a significant difference if you weigh over 200lb. Stock springs are OK not great and like most japanese bikes not good for heavier rider. I'm 190ib in gear. I replaced rear shock and love it but find the front performs great for my weight...good dampening and no dive.

2. New springs + racetech gold valves $300-$400. Add install cost if your not doing yourself. Will make a big difference, especially on dampening for almost any rider weight.

3. Cartridge inserts. about $1000 to $1200. add install cost if not doing yourself. Track level stuff. You can usually find $500 cartridge upgrade kits after a while from addreanni or hyperpro but I havent seen any yet.

4. Racetech or wilbers or ohlins custum forks. $3000 to $4000. Race level.

I agree with what john said above.....Properly setting up makes a big difference also. I've helped sever friends with this with their bikes and they are usually surprised how much better the oem stuff was performing after...(not implying yours is not...just stressing the significance)

Im not sure I agree with just buying a tuonno (Its a great bike)...I just think the suzuki is also a great bike, has a feel that is unique from the tuono and some might prefer it. You can arguably make the suspension on this bike superior to a tuono and still come in much cheaper. $9000 for bike +$4000 for completely custom front and rear.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
We get different bikes for different reasons (all bikes are good).

Instead of spending money upgrading this one, why not get the Tuono?
I agree......................bad ass bike, accidentally came out of a corner in a power wheelie a couple of years ago and it stayed in perfect line (not a care in the world)
Try the RSV4 much more comfy seat.

Just remember that there aren't that many real qualified mechanics to take care of all the little problems that they have & need a lot more TLC vs. Suzuki.;)
Thanks. I plan to buy a 2017 Tuono Factory next year about this time, but I also plan to keep the Suzuki. I would just like the forks on the Suzuki to work better on the roads I regularly ride. BTW, I have a local dealer who carries Aprilia, and they seem to be competent.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You don't say how you've set the front rebound and compression damping. Do you still get a harsh ride if your wind both adjusters right out? Slow rebound damping will give a new identical harsh ride to excessive compression damping on bad roads. Overweight springs for the riders weight/riding conditions similarly.

The only way I've ever been able to set compression damping is to first take both compression and rebound completely out of the equation by backing both right off. Then bring rebound up till you get the ride you want on rough roads, and only then bring up compression damping. By setting rebound correctly first you know any harshness as you increase compression damping is in fact due to that adjustment alone.

P.S. another advantage of screwing the front right back on both compression and rebound is to make sure the harshness is actually coming from the front. Don't know about other people but I have difficult tell which end is causing a harsh ride. For that reason I make sure the rear is set how I want it prior to bringing up front adjustments.
Thank you for the reply/advice. I did try letting the compression out and now the forks almost bottom out on some of the more bumpy roads on which I ride, yet they are still harsh on bumps that affect high speed compression. I weigh 195 lbs with all my riding gear. I think I'll take the bike to a local suspension "guru" and let them adjust the front forks and see if they can work any magic on them.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
As you said in your post, by replacing the rear shock things got better back there. I bet the new shock is set up for your weight. I think the GSX-s1000 is a great bike to start with but some of the value savings suzuki applied is in the suspension....with that said its all about home much your willing to spend.

1. New springs for your weight...$150 to $200...This makes a significant difference if you weigh over 200lb. Stock springs are OK not great and like most japanese bikes not good for heavier rider. I'm 190ib in gear. I replaced rear shock and love it but find the front performs great for my weight...good dampening and no dive.

2. New springs + racetech gold valves $300-$400. Add install cost if your not doing yourself. Will make a big difference, especially on dampening for almost any rider weight.

3. Cartridge inserts. about $1000 to $1200. add install cost if not doing yourself. Track level stuff. You can usually find $500 cartridge upgrade kits after a while from addreanni or hyperpro but I havent seen any yet.

4. Racetech or wilbers or ohlins custum forks. $3000 to $4000. Race level.

I agree with what john said above.....Properly setting up makes a big difference also. I've helped sever friends with this with their bikes and they are usually surprised how much better the oem stuff was performing after...(not implying yours is not...just stressing the significance)

Im not sure I agree with just buying a tuonno (Its a great bike)...I just think the suzuki is also a great bike, has a feel that is unique from the tuono and some might prefer it. You can arguably make the suspension on this bike superior to a tuono and still come in much cheaper. $9000 for bike +$4000 for completely custom front and rear.
Thanks. I will take your advice and let a local suspension "guru" have a go at adjusting the suspension. That's the most economical path to take. If they can't make the fork perform with just changing the compression and rebound dampening, then I'll explore some of the other options you've mentioned.
 

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Thank you for the reply/advice. I did try letting the compression out and now the forks almost bottom out on some of the more bumpy roads on which I ride, yet they are still harsh on bumps that affect high speed compression. I weigh 195 lbs with all my riding gear. I think I'll take the bike to a local suspension "guru" and let them adjust the front forks and see if they can work any magic on them.
By all means see what a local suspension 'guru' has to say. Do a bit of research to find a good one, they are no different to any profession or trade, some know next to nothing, most are pretty mediocre, and only a small few really know what they are talking about.

Regarding using compression to prevent forks from bottoming out, you'll always end up with a harsh ride on bumpy roads doing that. You might be able to get away with that fudge on a smooth race track, but on a bumpy C grade road, no way. The reason forks bottom out is (a) excessive rider sag, (b) insufficient spring weight for the riders weight, and (d) fork oil height to low. At 195 lbs (89 Kg) I would have expected the stock springs to be somewhat in the ballpark for your weight. I don't know, just would have thought that might be the case.

What's your front rider sag set to? Also, see my last post about reducing rebound damping. The harshness from excessive rebound damping is near indistinguishable from excessive compression damping. You feel the harshness as an upward bang of the bars, so its natural to assume its compression damping in the upward stroke. The wheel being slow to return due to excessive rebound damping and striking the front edge of the next bump while still returning will feel just the same. On bumpy roads you need a faster rebound than smooth roads for this very reason.
 

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Early congrats?

Thanks. I plan to buy a 2017 Tuono Factory next year about this time, but I also plan to keep the Suzuki. I would just like the forks on the Suzuki to work better on the roads I regularly ride. BTW, I have a local dealer who carries Aprilia, and they seem to be competent.
Best wishes to you, and hope you'l get it and be happy with it.
Can't compare them, totally different machines.
Maybe would be the same in comparing a Ferrari to the Acura MDX.

Smart move in also keeping this one ;) (every bike has its own personality and different purposes)


best regards
 

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Discussion Starter #11
By all means see what a local suspension 'guru' has to say. Do a bit of research to find a good one, they are no different to any profession or trade, some know next to nothing, most are pretty mediocre, and only a small few really know what they are talking about.

Regarding using compression to prevent forks from bottoming out, you'll always end up with a harsh ride on bumpy roads doing that. You might be able to get away with that fudge on a smooth race track, but on a bumpy C grade road, no way. The reason forks bottom out is (a) excessive rider sag, (b) insufficient spring weight for the riders weight, and (d) fork oil height to low. At 195 lbs (89 Kg) I would have expected the stock springs to be somewhat in the ballpark for your weight. I don't know, just would have thought that might be the case.

What's your front rider sag set to? Also, see my last post about reducing rebound damping. The harshness from excessive rebound damping is near indistinguishable from excessive compression damping. You feel the harshness as an upward bang of the bars, so its natural to assume its compression damping in the upward stroke. The wheel being slow to return due to excessive rebound damping and striking the front edge of the next bump while still returning will feel just the same. On bumpy roads you need a faster rebound than smooth roads for this very reason.
Thanks. The forks have not bottomed out from what I can tell. I put a zip tie on the front fork tube to see how far it travels. After my last ride, which admittedly was not over road surfaces which are real rough but did have some abrupt bumps, the forks had about an inch of travel left according to where the zip tie ended up on the fork tube.

I checked the static sag which was in the ballpark, but I have not measured the sag with me on the bike. I'll let the suspension person take that measurement and advise on what to do.

Thanks for the advice
 

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As you said in your post, by replacing the rear shock things got better back there. I bet the new shock is set up for your weight. I think the GSX-s1000 is a great bike to start with but some of the value savings suzuki applied is in the suspension....with that said its all about home much your willing to spend.

1. New springs for your weight...$150 to $200...This makes a significant difference if you weigh over 200lb. Stock springs are OK not great and like most japanese bikes not good for heavier rider. I'm 190ib in gear. I replaced rear shock and love it but find the front performs great for my weight...good dampening and no dive.

2. New springs + racetech gold valves $300-$400. Add install cost if your not doing yourself. Will make a big difference, especially on dampening for almost any rider weight.

3. Cartridge inserts. about $1000 to $1200. add install cost if not doing yourself. Track level stuff. You can usually find $500 cartridge upgrade kits after a while from addreanni or hyperpro but I havent seen any yet.

4. Racetech or wilbers or ohlins custum forks. $3000 to $4000. Race level.

I agree with what john said above.....Properly setting up makes a big difference also. I've helped sever friends with this with their bikes and they are usually surprised how much better the oem stuff was performing after...(not implying yours is not...just stressing the significance)

Im not sure I agree with just buying a tuonno (Its a great bike)...I just think the suzuki is also a great bike, has a feel that is unique from the tuono and some might prefer it. You can arguably make the suspension on this bike superior to a tuono and still come in much cheaper. $9000 for bike +$4000 for completely custom front and rear.
ive just ordered a set of springs from hyperpro, a progressive set,(actually i mistakenly ordered a linear set, but they noticed and emailed me, then changed them to the progresssive for me), ive noticed how harsh the stock initial fork action is, more so since installing the nitron R2 shock , so im hoping for better initial fork reponse as i ride alot of b-roads to avoid our over exuburant mobile tax collecters who will ticket you for any amount over the posted limit
 

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ive just ordered a set of springs from hyperpro, a progressive set,(actually i mistakenly ordered a linear set, but they noticed and emailed me, then changed them to the progresssive for me), ive noticed how harsh the stock initial fork action is, more so since installing the nitron R2 shock , so im hoping for better initial fork reponse as i ride alot of b-roads to avoid our over exuburant mobile tax collecters who will ticket you for any amount over the posted limit
Its funny, when I first got the bike I thought the suspension was just adequate to get started with. The forks were OK but I knew the rear was destined for upgrade. I put a wilburs on the back suddenly the forks were no longer OK. The back was/is performing great but the weakness of the front became supper apparent. Horrible dampening and rapid bump absorption.

I was going to do springs then looked into a revalve. I called traxxion dynamics and they said $675 for a custom revalve, new springs, fork rebuild (they have a hole process for this. Supposedly their rebuild and polishing process makes a difference itself.)

Their AK-20 custom cartridge kit was $1000 plus install cost. ($275 i think.) They offered me a discount on the cartridge set and no labor cost since I would be their first GSX-s1000. I'm expecting them back next week. The cartridges are modular meaning when I change bikes I can take them with me and have Taxxion fit them to the new bike.
 

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Its funny, when I first got the bike I thought the suspension was just adequate to get started with. The forks were OK but I knew the rear was destined for upgrade. I put a wilburs on the back suddenly the forks were no longer OK. The back was/is performing great but the weakness of the front became supper apparent. Horrible dampening and rapid bump absorption.

I was going to do springs then looked into a revalve. I called traxxion dynamics and they said $675 for a custom revalve, new springs, fork rebuild (they have a hole process for this. Supposedly their rebuild and polishing process makes a difference itself.)

Their AK-20 custom cartridge kit was $1000 plus install cost. ($275 i think.) They offered me a discount on the cartridge set and no labor cost since I would be their first GSX-s1000. I'm expecting them back next week. The cartridges are modular meaning when I change bikes I can take them with me and have Taxxion fit them to the new bike.
Funny just had the suspension on the wifes completely redone at SB Suspension in TN. My wife is inseam challenged so we had the bike lowered an inch. Since we upgraded the rear shock to a custom built JRi Double adjustable we decided to go ahead and have the front forks gone through at the same time per Kens recommendations.

Ken Hall went ahead and put a Ohlins 20 mm Valve Kit in the front forks and a set of linear springs of the same weight as the stockers which he said he was surprised by. They were 9.5KG and he was expecting less apparently. The Vlaving makes the difference as well as getting rid of the progressive springs for linear springs.

If anyone else is looking to upgrade the front or the back I will highly recommend Ken over other outfits that will go unnamed. Ken tuned my bike for the track a few years back and I have been a believer in his skill as well as the value you get for your money. With ken there is no need to retrofit shocks intended for other bikes since he can build the JRi shocks from scratch to your needed specs.
 

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ive never worked with SB suspension but have heard about them several times. I was initially going to go with a revalve but the cartridges and modular nature seemed like a good value. I hope T. Dynamics arn't the unamed outfit. They honestly seem to have a decent rep but this will be my first time using them. The only negative stuff I came across seemed typical and the issues almost always seemed resolved at the end. To be honest, i would love to have stuck an ohlins 25mm kit but way to much for me at $1800+. I've had matris cartridges on stuff in the past and was underwhelmed. The AK-20 seem to be held in good regard and if our rear shock is any indication, will be an improvement over stock fork internals. (Keeping my fingers crossed.)
 

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ive never worked with SB suspension but have heard about them several times. I was initially going to go with a revalve but the cartridges and modular nature seemed like a good value. I hope T. Dynamics arn't the unamed outfit. They honestly seem to have a decent rep but this will be my first time using them. The only negative stuff I came across seemed typical and the issues almost always seemed resolved at the end. To be honest, i would love to have stuck an ohlins 25mm kit but way to much for me at $1800+. I've had matris cartridges on stuff in the past and was underwhelmed. The AK-20 seem to be held in good regard and if our rear shock is any indication, will be an improvement over stock fork internals. (Keeping my fingers crossed.)
I had Traxxion on my 2008 Goldwing and had their AK-20's in the forks as well as their triple tree upgrade, fork brace ect. Pretty much everything they offered for the Goldwing. I guess my question would be who did you talk to over there and are you just doing the cartridges or cartridges and springs??

Not pushing Ken, but all I can say is that his customer service is beyond reproach ( as far as our transaction was concerned). Not to mention that he is actually at the track tuning suspension. I agree that $1800 for an ohlins cartridge kit is a lot of money. I guess more than anything I just wanted you all to know that there is another option out there.

Ken is working on a deal with JRi to manufacture shock parts to his specifications and start his own shock line. I know that if people give Ken a chance he will impress you with his personal touch that he puts in each component he handles or builds for his customers.

And as far as the nonamed company is concerned I cannot comment since the last time I did that, it started an email conversation that ended with me being suckered into spending more of my money when it was supposed to cost me nothing.

ken has all the information he needs to set up our bikes to each riders needs after working on my wifes bike.
 

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we have local guy here who is an ohlins trained suspension tech - robert taylor (of kSS suspension), i rang him about the stock rear shock, thinking he would suggest an ohlins, but as he does alot of work for our local racers and has previously got the nitrons working to a simular std as the ohlins, i went with the nitron set up to suit my weight and my preference for fast b-roads - i.e bumpy & windy, for 2/3rds the price of the ohlins, he also said the fork would need cartridges to really fix it but at $2000nz .
so im just after a bit more intial compliance in the fork, wth the progressive springs, which hyperpro reccomend, if thats not enough, ill be stripping the forks down for some valving upgrades, have previously used racetech, but im open to whatever is proven too work.
 

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Hey temp...you might want to consider the T. Dynamics option before revalve. I should be able to give a review on them sometime during the next week. The reason I say consider their product is mainly because of price. I know some people can get a redvalve done relatively cheap but it seems they tend to be 500 to 600 from any of the bigger places. The revalve at T. Dynamics with racetech valves would come out to $675. The ak20s would come out to 1200ish installed. I know it sounds like double but the install is reversible and modular..... meaning you can take your new cartridges out when you sell the bike and install them in your next one. If you do sell them you can argue that the cost is now cheaper than the re-valve and you would obviously not have to spend more money on the next bike if you already have them. (I guess that excludes the cost of installing on the new bike though). I was going to do the valve with springs but choose the cartridges based on the above.
In my mind, the quality of the rear shock is likely a good indicator of the quality of materials used for the fork internals. In the very least, I expect improvement from the use of better materials alone in addition to building with a higher degree of precision than OEM. But, like I said, let's wait till I get them on the motorcycle and try them out before I keep singing anymore praises!!.... who knows, i might end up giving ken a call


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i await your testing results with anticipation , the hyper pro springs are to be delivered tommorow apparently ( euro freight seems amazingly effective), so they will be installed prior to my bike being back together, the insurance co is allowing me to intall the suzuki parts from the lil crash i had, as i am ex-m/cycle tech, ive carried out racetech goldvalve installs previously, but im not biased to them, just they did improve the bikes suspension performance well, ive been trying to upload some pics to "my garage", but havent acheived that yet!, any advice ???
 

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i await your testing results with anticipation , the hyper pro springs are to be delivered tommorow apparently ( euro freight seems amazingly effective), so they will be installed prior to my bike being back together, the insurance co is allowing me to intall the suzuki parts from the lil crash i had, as i am ex-m/cycle tech, ive carried out racetech goldvalve installs previously, but im not biased to them, just they did improve the bikes suspension performance well, ive been trying to upload some pics to "my garage", but havent acheived that yet!, any advice ???



New toy came today....will be a couple days before i can install them though.




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