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Today I swapped the spark plugs, changed the oil, and replaced the stock air filter with a K&N on my GSX with 13,500 miles. I went with a K&N air filter because it can be reused, and I used some weather stripping goo from AutoZone on the channel that the air filter rests into to make the seal a little tighter between the filter and airbox. I removed the air restrictor plate from the air box while I was at it. I know that higher airflow may make it run a bit leaner but I have a PCV installed running Frank's tune from the UK, which is actually leaner in the lower revs but between 5-10% richer in a few places in the higher revs, so I figure it'll be fine.
You have to remove the gas tank and entire air box to access the spark plug boots and plugs. A 10 mm socket unbolted the air box from a bracket on the right side of the key tumbler assembly, I removed the 2 breather hoses on the right and center aspects of the airbox, removed two wiring harness mounts from the right and central aspects of the airbox, and used a roughly 5 mm star pattern wrench to loosen the strap clamps that were holding the air inlets from the air box onto the throttle bodies. The bolts that hold the air inlets onto the throttle bodies appear to be allen-type bolts, but none of the Allen wrenches in my full sets of metrics and standards Allen sets would loosen the clamps, while a star bit did the job. A 10 mm ratchet removes most of the fittings underneath the gas tank. I cross threaded and stripped one of the bolts on the front end of the gas tank that secures the tank to the frame (oops) and had to run to the auto parts store to get a tap. The tap cleaned up the threads and luckily I can give the bolt a 1/4 turn past hand tight and it still holds.
The existing factory spark plugs felt **** near hand tightened while I was removing them, so I "snugged" the new ones in without being greedy with torque. Spark plugs were OEM ngk iridium plugs. The original plugs had hardened white deposits on them, which I'm told means it was running lean (black residue=rich, white/brown=lean).
The bike cranks and runs, so I guess I didn't screw anything up too majorly during my wrenching!
I have always replaced the oil and filter on time with Castrol full syn 10w-40 and an original Suzuki filter from my local dealer. I have also cleaned and rewaxed the chain every few hundred miles. The front sprocket teeth have a "shark fin" appearance but have not started to make noise yet; cleaning and waxing the chain keeps it quiet and I figure the original chain and sprockets will go 20,000 miles as I'm primarily puttering around town and only letting her scream a few times during each ride.
The GSX is a venerable back road shredder with it's tractor like motor and slick gearbox, wide handlebars for leverage, and comfy riding position, but it's equally at home running errands and commuting. I still am in my helmet like: "mother of God" when I wring it out in 1st, 2nd, and 3rd...
I have dialed in 30 mm of static sag front and rear for my weight (285lb), loosened up the front compression and given the rear shock about a quarter turn of faster rebound to account for my big ass!
I've really been enjoying this bike...
 

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Nice write up. Question about the plugs. What did you replace the stock NGK Iridium plugs with? Did you check the stock plug gap? I am curious what they were set at compared to factory gap specs. Did the stock plugs look like they would of been fine running 20K or did they look pretty worn @ 13.5K? If it would not be too much hassle and you still have em a pic of the stock plugs would be awesome. Thanks a lot.
 

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I bought replacement OEM NGK iridium plugs from bike bandit.com. The old plugs would've gone a lot longer, but I don't want to "carbon glue" the plugs into the block for fear of it being able to get them out when they truly do need to be replaced. I'll post a pic when I get a chance.
 

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Thanks for the write up! I think that the owners manual and shop manual call for spark plug replacement at 7,500 miles. I bought some (along with an airfilter) and am getting ready to attempt it soon so I appreciate your post.
 

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Great Info guys. This will certainly help others determine when to swap theirs out also. Maybe we should share the type of riding done between our maintenance. In my case most of my miles are 70 MPH commuting with about 20% stop and go, so I expect to go a bit longer between services on some stuff compared to a city stop and go and a track day rider.
 

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Question: What keeps fuel from spilling out of the fuel supply hose under the tank when it is disconnected in an effort to remove the tank?

Thanks.
 

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It's funny how NGK Iridium plugs are good for 100,000 miles in cars, but 7,500 in our bikes. Is the difference because of the RPM (# firings)?
 

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It's funny how NGK Iridium plugs are good for 100,000 miles in cars, but 7,500 in our bikes. Is the difference because of the RPM (# firings)?

Thinking the very same thing. Suzuki require changing them around a tenth of the cars interval.
The reason my Dealer Service Manager quoted was that bikes rev a lot harder than cars, so have more firing cycles on the plugs to wear them out faster.


Rob.
 

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It's funny how NGK Iridium plugs are good for 100,000 miles in cars, but 7,500 in our bikes. Is the difference because of the RPM (# firings)?
I think they just want more parts and service money. I just can't see those plugs wearing out that fast....I don't buy it. I can see checking them at that interval, if nothing else it will keep carbon build up off of the threads. With as lean as these EURO-4 bikes have to run I would think that is a minimal issue at best.
 
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It's funny how NGK Iridium plugs are good for 100,000 miles in cars, but 7,500 in our bikes. Is the difference because of the RPM (# firings)?
I think they just want more parts and service money. I just can't see those plugs wearing out that fast....I don't buy it. I can see checking them at that interval, if nothing else it will keep carbon build up off of the threads. With as lean as these EURO-4 bikes have to run I would think that is a minimal issue at best.


Correct! Its to make $ for the service dept.
Plugs can go 2/ 3 times that distance. Also the recommended valve adjustment interval is bs
 

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I think they just want more parts and service money. I just can't see those plugs wearing out that fast....I don't buy it. I can see checking them at that interval, if nothing else it will keep carbon build up off of the threads. With as lean as these EURO-4 bikes have to run I would think that is a minimal issue at best.
I agree - I'm with you. At the most, I'd say my bike on average revs 4x what my car does, so maybe 25,000 miles with an inspection in between.
 

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Totally agree. Use to have a gsxr750k8 which I had from 2008 to 2015 which clocked up 76000 km commuting
Never replaced the spark plugs and never checked the valve clearances only thing I did was fresh oil and filter every 6 months
 

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Question: What keeps fuel from spilling out of the fuel supply hose under the tank when it is disconnected in an effort to remove the tank?

Thanks.
Vacuum. :nerd:
 

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What is the recommended interval for valve clearance check? I'm OK with whatever interval they suggest for 'checking' clearances, although I'd probably re-think that statement if I was paying someone to do it.
 

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What is the recommended interval for valve clearance check? I'm OK with whatever interval they suggest for 'checking' clearances, although I'd probably re-think that statement if I was paying someone to do it.
24000km or 15000 miles :)
 

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Question: What keeps fuel from spilling out of the fuel supply hose under the tank when it is disconnected in an effort to remove the tank?

Thanks.
the 'short' service manual (online, linked somewhere on this forum) shows that the fuel pump is inside the tank, so fuel shouldn't escape when you remove the tank.

It says to have less than 1/4 tank of fuel before removing the tank, so fuel doesn't seep from the refill cap when you raise and support the tank from the front to undo the connections underneath.
 

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What's crazy about all this (for me) is I absolutely love doing all the real maintenance work (I'm in the middle of rebuilding the engine on my GS1100), but I really don't want to mess with the fairing clips! :eek:
 

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Me too. I just know I'm going to break something trying to get those fairings off. I've read the procedure, but due to nomenclature problems and ambiguous instructions, it's still not very clear. Hopefully by the time I have to remove them someone will have made a how-to video.
 

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I had a bear of a time on the first bike trying to get the fairings unclipped behind the front wheel, and ended up doing my oil changes w/o touching the fairing. For the 600 mile service, I had the top 'meter panels' and stuff off, but never that lower joint.
 

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Today I swapped the spark plugs, changed the oil, and replaced the stock air filter with a K&N on my GSX with 13,500 miles. I went with a K&N air filter because it can be reused, and I used some weather stripping goo from AutoZone on the channel that the air filter rests into to make the seal a little tighter between the filter and airbox. I removed the air restrictor plate from the air box while I was at it. I know that higher airflow may make it run a bit leaner but I have a PCV installed running Frank's tune from the UK, which is actually leaner in the lower revs but between 5-10% richer in a few places in the higher revs, so I figure it'll be fine.
You have to remove the gas tank and entire air box to access the spark plug boots and plugs. A 10 mm socket unbolted the air box from a bracket on the right side of the key tumbler assembly, I removed the 2 breather hoses on the right and center aspects of the airbox, removed two wiring harness mounts from the right and central aspects of the airbox, and used a roughly 5 mm star pattern wrench to loosen the strap clamps that were holding the air inlets from the air box onto the throttle bodies. The bolts that hold the air inlets onto the throttle bodies appear to be allen-type bolts, but none of the Allen wrenches in my full sets of metrics and standards Allen sets would loosen the clamps, while a star bit did the job. A 10 mm ratchet removes most of the fittings underneath the gas tank. I cross threaded and stripped one of the bolts on the front end of the gas tank that secures the tank to the frame (oops) and had to run to the auto parts store to get a tap. The tap cleaned up the threads and luckily I can give the bolt a 1/4 turn past hand tight and it still holds.
The existing factory spark plugs felt **** near hand tightened while I was removing them, so I "snugged" the new ones in without being greedy with torque. Spark plugs were OEM ngk iridium plugs. The original plugs had hardened white deposits on them, which I'm told means it was running lean (black residue=rich, white/brown=lean).
The bike cranks and runs, so I guess I didn't screw anything up too majorly during my wrenching!
I have always replaced the oil and filter on time with Castrol full syn 10w-40 and an original Suzuki filter from my local dealer. I have also cleaned and rewaxed the chain every few hundred miles. The front sprocket teeth have a "shark fin" appearance but have not started to make noise yet; cleaning and waxing the chain keeps it quiet and I figure the original chain and sprockets will go 20,000 miles as I'm primarily puttering around town and only letting her scream a few times during each ride.
The GSX is a venerable back road shredder with it's tractor like motor and slick gearbox, wide handlebars for leverage, and comfy riding position, but it's equally at home running errands and commuting. I still am in my helmet like: "mother of God" when I wring it out in 1st, 2nd, and 3rd...
I have dialed in 30 mm of static sag front and rear for my weight (285lb), loosened up the front compression and given the rear shock about a quarter turn of faster rebound to account for my big ass!
I've really been enjoying this bike...

I did the same thing (new air filter, spark plugs, oil and filter) over the last couple of days. I would not have attempted it with out a shop manual, but its not too hard. I just go slow because I have struggled with mechanical stuff in the past from time to time.

My plugs were a nice light brown and looked like they could have gone a lot further than the 7,800 miles on them. During reassembly I too had a little trouble lining up the bolts that hold down the front of the gas tank. The trick I think is to leave the bolt holding the rear of the tank loose so there is some free play. Install the front bolts and then tighten the rear. A 3mm hex socket fit the airbox clamps that fit over the throttle bodies on my bike but you need a long extension to get to the inside ones. After reassembly, its raining of course, so I started in the garage and no fault codes, yea!! Can't wait to ride it. If there are truly no issues after I disassembled and reassembled, I just may work up the courage to do the valve inspection and adjustment when its due.

I agree with Nixonkid, I have really been enjoying this bike too!! It is a hellofa bike for the money.

PS I had some 3/8 inch gas hose sitting around and I split about 5 inches of it and it fit perfectly over the clutch cable as it passes over the top of the radiator.
 
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