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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
First of all, don't buy the base model (https://www.aliexpress.us/item/2251832769128284.html) but instead buy the $4 more expensive one that has spare parts and many more attachment options (https://www.aliexpress.us/item/2255800194317488.html). I bought mine for $18.

However, I did install the base model with no problems; just be advised you only get one Sharkbite attachment, so if you mess up the length of tubing then you're buying a new oiler.

Installation: I installed the feed tubing on a line from the center of primary drive to about midway of the swingers, then zipped tied and M3 taped it to the bottom of the swing-arm.
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Going forward to the bike, I ran the rest of the tubing through the frame,
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and attached the oil pump to the engine by unscrewing a single bolt.
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Trying to figure out the routing probably took me about 2 hours, with a lot of false starts. I think you almost have to run the tubing through the frame because otherwise it runs too close to the chain or your foot touches it. I personally put the pump way down low and on the left side of the bike nearer the radiator because I didn't want it on the handlebar (the recommended place). You could put it almost anywhere else on the bike if you wanted to, but after trying out a number of places and sitting on the bike the low and to the left reach seemed easiest to reach and didn't interfere.

Interestingly, the feeder tube only hits one side of the chain but the entire chain gets lubricated if the chain is already wet but NOT if the chain is clean and dry. So you'll need to "prime" the chain; I just ran the chain a few times with my finger underneath it on the rollers and that was enough for the oil to leap to the other side.

Usage: This is a pressure fed pump. You fill it up all the way, making sure there's no air, and the more you twist it, the more oil gets fed. About 1/4 to 1/2 turn seems about right to feed the chain. Even if you fed the chain every ride, it would still take a very long time to go through a quart of motor oil.

Result: I first encountered a chain oiler in the wild when a very young girl on an SV650 had a ridiculously clean chain and bike. At the time I had a shaft-drive bike but always kept that conversation in mind. She said she had tried a number of oils but the best oil seemed to be a very light motor oil as that would capture the dirt getting onto the chain and immediately fling it off.

Hence, I filled the oil pump with 5w-30, and about 400 miles and a few refills later I do indeed have a nearly spotless chain and sprockets. I did notice the area around the primary drive sprocket and the top of the swing-arm has gradually become cleaner as oil gets spilled on it and gradually drips off the bike. The previous owner of the bike used tacky chain lube and getting that off was difficult.

Does it work: if we're talking about actually extending chain life then I'm not sure after just 400 miles. It does always seem to keep the chain coated with a very thin film of oil, and there's no dirt or grime. There doesn't seem to be any oil film on the bike, and perhaps just a touch on the rim nearer the chain but not on the other side. Even directly underneath the chain guard there doesn't seem to be any dirt. You can put the bike on an ABBA center stand, spin the rear wheel with a rag, and get barely even a smudge of dirt.
 

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I had a DIY oiler too, agree with the oil film flinging off the dirt, mine is driven by the rear wheel.speed.sensor. Building a new now... microcontroller.drives a microdosing pump as.per the adjustable interval and runtime. Had one on my Bandit for years, when I wrecked it the chain was nearly new after 30-40k miles.

It does tend to male the rear of the bike dirty, but well worth it.

I run with the control box and 10oz.or so of oil under the pillion seat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I had a DIY oiler too, agree with the oil film flinging off the dirt, mine is driven by the rear wheel.speed.sensor. Building a new now... microcontroller.drives a microdosing pump as.per the adjustable interval and runtime. Had one on my Bandit for years, when I wrecked it the chain was nearly new after 30-40k miles.

It does tend to male the rear of the bike dirty, but well worth it.

I run with the control box and 10oz.or so of oil under the pillion seat.
The original oil pumps of what I bought were originally selling for $120 to $145. At that price I could just hire someone to clean my chain with q-tips for six hours. The Aliexpress knockoff was $22 at the most.

I did see the Scottoiler for between $120 to $220, and while those are automatic a few YouTube videos convinced me of the ridiculousness of installing one when I could be doing just about anything else for cheaper and more fun. And, curiously, there's seems to be just as many videos of people rebuilding bikes and having to uninstall a Scottoiler that went bad.

This Aliexpress oil pump doesn't require any weird wiring, vacuum pump routing, drilling, etc. And it can be removed by removing a single engine bolt; everything else is either zip ties or M3 double-sided tape. Most importantly, from my viewpoint, it won't discharge oil unless you turn the knob; an important factor considering that's oil near your rear tire.

Interestingly, I haven't noticed it making the rear of the bike dirty at all but I am using just about the thinnest oil available. Let's be real; I bought it so my chain, sprockets, and rim looks clean. And they do look clean. Even the area between the links are shiny.
 

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Given the cost of the bike and insurance I tend to not get worked up about buying and making gizmos for it. Being a hobbyist EE, designing and building an oiler is an interesting project. In that context, the 10oz bottle and electronics means the oiler runs automatically and will last for a month of frequent rides or about 2wks of intensive riding. By automatic, I mean it requires no manual involvement; oil dose occurs at the set intervals while the bike is moving and thats it.

I never quite liked the Scottoiler stuff either, frankly all the systems I looked at seemed more or less of a kludge- hence going for tapping off the wheel speed sensor so as to get good data on movement. Going off the shift indicator might work too, ie, dose only when in 2nd or higher. Its generally easier to interface with the wheel speed transducers, so thats what I used on the Bandit and R6. I'm building a new one for the gsxs because the old one went with the R6. I built that old one about 2011 so it would have been in operation for more than 10 years of riding if I still had it. It did have a couple issues with corrosion on the circuit board due to poor cleaning of flux on my part, and it needed some modification to handle the much greater resolution of the R6's wheel speed transducer but the design held up fine.

The old one was entirely discrete components which was fun to make but not as adjustable as I would prefer. The new one uses a microcontroller and a fancy led display from the Arduino/Pi people; so adjustment is more convenient.

Certainly be as real as you like- for my part I don't much care about shiny or clean as long as it doesn't get too horrible. I bought the bike to ride and if in the end its road-worn, sunbleached and a bit grimy then I'm satisfied. Could be I tend to set the oiler for greater volume than you, I like to see the chain slightly wet with no more than 1 drop on the ground when the bike is parked after a 30 min ride.
 

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Given the cost of the bike and insurance I tend to not get worked up about buying and making gizmos for it. Being a hobbyist EE, designing and building an oiler is an interesting project. In that context, the 10oz bottle and electronics means the oiler runs automatically and will last for a month of frequent rides or about 2wks of intensive riding. By automatic, I mean it requires no manual involvement; oil dose occurs at the set intervals while the bike is moving and thats it.

I never quite liked the Scottoiler stuff either, frankly all the systems I looked at seemed more or less of a kludge- hence going for tapping off the wheel speed sensor so as to get good data on movement. Going off the shift indicator might work too, ie, dose only when in 2nd or higher. Its generally easier to interface with the wheel speed transducers, so thats what I used on the Bandit and R6. I'm building a new one for the gsxs because the old one went with the R6. I built that old one about 2011 so it would have been in operation for more than 10 years of riding if I still had it. It did have a couple issues with corrosion on the circuit board due to poor cleaning of flux on my part, and it needed some modification to handle the much greater resolution of the R6's wheel speed transducer but the design held up fine.

The old one was entirely discrete components which was fun to make but not as adjustable as I would prefer. The new one uses a microcontroller and a fancy led display from the Arduino/Pi people; so adjustment is more convenient.

Certainly be as real as you like- for my part I don't much care about shiny or clean as long as it doesn't get too horrible. I bought the bike to ride and if in the end its road-worn, sunbleached and a bit grimy then I'm satisfied. Could be I tend to set the oiler for greater volume than you, I like to see the chain slightly wet with no more than 1 drop on the ground when the bike is parked after a 30 min ride.
A fellow tinkerer, hi!! Sorry off topic - I plan to build a SDS interface - maybe we can collaborate?
 

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Sure :) got the software running in the cpu (8 pin pic), display and adjustmetns are working, got the pump drive done, working on the opto isolation and divider. Happy to post pics and schematic but maybe we should start a different thread- shouldn't pollute a pressure-oiler thread with nerd stuff I think.
 

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I started a thread on my DIY oiler-


would be polite to move any related conversation there rather than distracting this one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I started a thread on my DIY oiler-


would be polite to move any related conversation there rather than distracting this one.
It hurts my feelings when you leave my party.

On a more serious note, I've been wondering what weight oil to use. I've been using 10w30 motor oil which gets flung off quickly but does seem to leave a film of oil but I'm wondering to buy a heavier oil.
 

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I've used 5w and 10w also- the micropumps like 5w better. My theory is the 5w is preferable to help wash dirt off the chain. OTOH since yours is manually actuated the 10W might be preferable it would surely stick around longer. IMHO the long-term preservation of the chain is well worth the effort and expense of setting up such a system
(y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I've used 5w and 10w also- the micropumps like 5w better. My theory is the 5w is preferable to help wash dirt off the chain. OTOH since yours is manually actuated the 10W might be preferable it would surely stick around longer. IMHO the long-term preservation of the chain is well worth the effort and expense of setting up such a system
(y)
I've been using a lot more oil lately. I give it a quarter turn when starting off and a quarter turn about a mile from my destination. Spot checking it between red lights does indeed show I wasn't using it enough; I think just keeping it wet by giving it a squirt every 30 minutes or so works.
 

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I use the "chain wet with oil" as an indicator also- easy to observe and easy to notice when its not. Over the years I had a couple issues with the old oiler circuit (broken lead on the voltage regulator, flux residue reacting with humidity), the problems being indicated by the chain becoming dry.
 
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