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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My stock tire ran out of rubber and I had to get a new rear tire. I put on a Dunlop Q3 Sportmax 190/50/17 rear tire.



I'm posting my process on how I removed/reinstalled my rear wheel. This just how I did my tire replacement. Do your removal your own way.

Tools I used are:

1 - 10mm open end wrench (wheel sensor bracket & chain adjusters)
1 - 12mm open end wrench (chain adjuster)
1 - 36mm socket (rear axle nut)
1 - Torque wrench that will go up to 74 foot pounds (100Nm)
1 - Rear stand to get the rear tire off the ground.
1 - Small cloth had towel
2 - 6" x 9" Maroon Scotch-Brite™ Very Fine General Purpose Hand Pad

After putting the motorcycle up on a rear stand, I removed the rear wheel speed sensor bracket (10mm bolt) and pulled out the pin/sensor. You can leave the pin/sensor bolted in place, but you risk the chance of breaking it. So... I removed my sensor.






Remove the rear axle nut & washer, loosen the lock nuts on the chain adjusters for both sides of the swing arm.

Put a small folded hand towel on top of the rear brake caliper to prevent it from scratching the rim.



I put my foot under the rear tire. By keeping my heal on the ground and only raising my toes off the ground toward the tire, my foot supports the wheel and keeps it from dropping down onto the rear brake caliper (after the rear axle is pulled from the swing arm).

With my toes against the bottom of the tire, I removed the axle from the swing arm. Keeping the rear wheel in place, slide the rear brake caliper toward the rear of the motorcycle, and move it to the outside of swing arm.

Moved the wheel forward enough to remove the chain from the sprockets, moved my foot out of the way, lowered the wheel to the ground, and rolled the wheel from the swing arm. Now the wheel is out.

Be sure to notice the female grove on the inner part of the swing arm where the brake caliper bracket slides into, and check out the male post on the bracket too. The bracket must slide back into this grove when the wheel is being installed, and the brake disk must go between the brake pads too.

Removed the spacer from each side of the wheel, and then removed the sprocket/drum assembly too.

I took my wheel to a Suzuki dealer (Action Suzuki in Mesquite, Texas) to have the new tire installed & balanced. The cost was $39.96 and I was in and out of their front door in 15 minutes. Also, the Tech did not put one single scratch on the rim!

To reinstall the wheel, install sprocket/drum assembly, and the spacers for both sides of the wheel. Have the chain adjusters and axle laid out to make the reassembly easier.

Roll the rear wheel back inside the swing arm, put your foot back under the tire, and gently slide the brake caliper (with towel on top) back into its grove. You will have to make sure the brake disk goes in between the brake pads as you lift the wheel to install the axle. Put the chain back onto the sprocket.

Install the axle with the chain adjuster back into the swing arm, install the axle washer and nut, remove your foot from under the tire, and remove the hand towel from the brake caliper.

I like to pre-tighten the axle nut to 50 foot pounds before the chain adjuster to adjusted to the proper chain slack. I think this pre-tightening gives a better chain slack adjustment (keeps the axle from moving both ways). Adjust the chain adjusters to get the proper chain slack. Standard chain slack is 0.79 - 1.18" (20 - 30mm).



With the motorcycle still on the stand, use a Scotch-Brite pad against the new tire to gently remove the slippery gloss. These pads will not "Sand or Scratch" the tire like sandpaper, but they can minimize the slipper gloss before you go for a ride. Rotate the wheel to make it easier to scuff off the slippery gloss.



Tire manufacturers do not recommend washing or sanding your tires. They go to great lengths to design and engineer tire treads, so the last thing you should do is attack the tread surface with a belt sander! It is also a bit risky using any chemical solution on a tire as you do not know if it will be applied evenly and how it will react with the tire. A wipe with a dry cloth or even the Scotch-Brite very fine pad is fine. Notice that race bikes leave the pits with shiny new tires that have not been belt-sanded or washed with any chemicals. I read the best way to break in a tire (lose that slippery gloss and become sticky) is to heat it up and the most effective way to heat a tire is slowly over a long-distance ride. Anyway…

Remove the stand from the motorcycle and recheck your chain slack. Check the chain slack and adjust again if needed. BE SURE TO Tighten the axle nut to 74 foot pounds (100Nm).

Go for a safe ride to finish breaking in the rear tire and be sure to recheck your chain slack afterwards.

 

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Discussion Starter #4
Did you remove your exhaust can to replace the tire or is that how you ride?
I did remove the exhaust muffler/can so i would not damage it for this repair.

I keep the muffler on the exhaust to keep down the exhaust sound when I am just riding around town. If I need to take it off, I only have to remove two retaining springs.

I do ride with an open header when I plan on using my nitrous.

I made a custom 2-step exhaust for my motorcycle.

http://www.gsxs1000.org/forum/exhaust-headers/31898-self-made-custom-gsx-s1000-step-exhaust.html

 
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Discussion Starter #5

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Discussion Starter #6
Did you remove your exhaust can to replace the tire or is that how you ride?
I took of the muffler because I did not want to damage it while I was replacing the rear tire. I usually ride with the muffler on, unless I plan on using my nitrous.

 
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There is no need to try and get the shiny off your tires. Just give the tires a good amount of time to warm up then increase lean angle gradually (easy on the throttle).

Also from the times I have had to change the rear my take is this is the worst design I have seen from Suzuki so far. I can't get the rear out or in without scratching the crap out of the rim. To get the in our out you have to pull the brake caliper all the way to the back edge of the channel (mine barely has enough slack in the brake line and sensor line to even come out of the channel) With that you will have to turn the wheel at an angle to try and slide it past the brake brake caliper and line. Now with the chain guard there this is a very tight fit. Now comes the fun part and one of my biggest issues with Suzuki. Since the Caliper is now on top of the brake rotor you have great chance of knocking the brake pad out of the channel. At this point you will have pull the wheel back out and try to get the brake pad back in the slot.

The one cheat I have found is to get a block of wood that puts the wheel at the right height off the ground get the axle in. I am looking to get a small 1"x10" plank of wood and put some small wheels on it so I can roll the tire in on that. The amount of clearance between the chain guard and caliper/and brake line is pathetic. MY plan is also to get change the rear brake line to make this easier as well. I would look at painting my rims, but with this setup there is no point as there is about 95% chance to scratch the rim upon removal or install. I tried the towel as well and with it didn't have enough clearance to get the wheel in or out.

Heck this issue is one reason I am thinking about trading it in on a Ducati Monster.
 

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250 mm rotors , is not a 220 mm ;)
 

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Why not just pull the caliper? It's two bolts.
Shoot you may be on to something. I will look at that tonight and see, but that just might be the ticket. Never thought of doing that to take it off the bracket and wheel. Now I just need CZ to make some forged rims for this bike. I can't believe this thing has been out in Europe for 2 years and we still don't have crap for after market goodies.
 

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S1K...Just replaced my rear tire and used your system. It does work but was more work than I anticipated. It was somewhat difficult to keep the spacers in against the bearings while fiddling with the alignment. Got it after about three tries and some help from my wife to start the axle in. All is good now and looking forward to trying out the new 190/55 boot. Thanks for the post!
 

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I found 4 small random scrap pieces of wood (different thicknesses) that together fill the space perfectly from the floor to the bottom of the tire. No need to use your foot to hold the tire up. When I pull the axle, the tire stays exactly in same position. Is awesome. Wheel just rolls out to the rear. When reinstalling, all is lined up perfect. No physical strain.
 

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I have changed many many tires on bikes over the years and never had an issue until I changed out my GSXR 750. That bike flew out from under me so fast that I never saw it coming. If it never happened to you let this be a warning. Newer high performance light sport bikes with big tires can and will loose traction easily with a new tire. I will admit my tire was probably covered in soap from the installation I just fought through and I road across a wet lawn. Ok it was probably all my fault but I will never forget it and will scuff up any new tires from this point forward.
 
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