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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all, It's been 7 years but I'm ready, anxious, and itching to pick up another bike! Truth be told I've been all of these things for the past 7 years but the time is finally right!

I've been looking very strongly at both the Speed Triple and the GSXS1000 for my next purchase. I test rode the Speed Triple but there is only so much you can feel about the bike in a 10 mile run. I haven't found a dealership in the Atlanta area yet to let me test ride the GSXS1000 but I'm still calling around while I'm "working" during the day.

I'm particularly curious to how the torque relates between these two since acceleration is where I derive the most pleasure on a bike. I've seen charts and graphs but charts and adrenaline often don't report the same results.

Has anyone owned or spent a bit of time on both bikes? What is the thing that you liked about each bike more than the other? How does the low and mid-range power compare between the two? I understand that these bikes are very different from each other but I'd appreciate a comparison between the two, aside from the obvious, from someone who has experience with both.
 

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Gsxs > speed triple

Have not ridden the latest speed triple but I can tell from previous models that it's weaker, less reliable but lighter so a tad more flickable. You'll get addicted to the gsxs. Also any issues you read about have easy cheap fixes which make this bike the best option in its class.


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This may help:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1FRknrhLc9c

However, with the snatch throttle, its a quick free fix for me and a lot of the people on the forum here. The TPS is rotated to produce a lean mixture from the dealer(possibly to pass emissions). Just rotate it to open the bike up and cure the throttle snatch if yours has it.

I've had triumphs in the past, getting parts has been an issue. Suzuki parts are everywhere and cheap.

Gsxs > speed triple

Have not ridden the latest speed triple but I can tell from previous models that it's weaker, less reliable but lighter so a tad more flickable. You'll get addicted to the gsxs. Also any issues you read about have easy cheap fixes which make this bike the best option in its class.


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I sold my 08 Speed Triple last summer after owning it since new. It was a great bike for speed and travel. But I can say that the bike didn't like the corners as much as the Suzuki which in my opinion is a much better handling machine. But that was an 08, you'd really need to take the new Speedy for a test ride and see how you like leaning her over.
 

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Hi, may be able to help. I have a 2016 Speed triple R, my wife has a GSXS1000S - new ecu + throttle tamer, plus upgraded brake pads fitted. Done a few hundred miles on her bike so I can give the following feedback on both bikes -
I like both bikes, but they are playing the same game from different perspectives -

Speed Triple feels like a heavier bike at standstill as it carries its weight higher, on the road the Ohlin's suspension ( R model ) is way better than the Suzuki in terms of damping and feed back as you'd expect. Having said that she plans to change the rear shock on the Suzuki which will improve the ride quality. Handling wise there is little to choose, if anything for me the Suzuki is a tad more intuitive and requires less input for quick direction changes, on fast sweepers theres nothing between them. On a B road ( minor ) the Suzuki would probably be quicker ( for me ), but having said that a Street triple could give both a run for their money on a really tight road.

Engine charecteritics between the two are poles apart, the Suzuki is typical in line four, loads of grunt at revs, the Speed Triple matches it torque wise abliet much lower and has character !

Quality and value for money wise they are in different worlds, even the S model Speed Triple is head and shoulders above the Suzuki,i did think the Suzuki was a typical built to a price jap bike, but the MT10 has changed all that, so may be Suzuki is just making a bigger margin ?

Electronics on the Speed are comprehensive and work well, Suzuki traction control works well but that's all you've got, and to be honest all you need ??

Before the new Speed Triple was launched I was seriously considering the Suzuki, which I guess says it all as I ended going down the Triumph route.

The GSXS is a cracking bike, and a good starting point to refine to something even better. Against this is resale value which will be lower, the hassle of sorting things that Suzuki could have easily done, how it fares overtime finish wise etc.

cheers
mitch
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I've had triumphs in the past, getting parts has been an issue. Suzuki parts are everywhere and cheap.
What parts did you need to order? Were they common items, accessories, or uncommonly replaced pieces?

Do you know if the trouble getting them was due to the specific dealer or their supplier? I have a Triumph dealership a few miles away from me and their US headquarters is an hour drive.

The availability of Suzuki parts and service centers is certainly a bonus. Plus, a lot more people know a lot more Suzuki than they do Triumph.
 

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I live within 20 minutes of 3 dealerships in Sydney. But regardless of access to the dealerships, the issues my triumph riding mates and I had was always parts being on Back order. Things like, the regulator rectifier, which used to plague triumphs. (I'm hoping they are all sorted now) They all blew up. Within a few months of each other and it was after the warranty period.

Regardless, they had to back order them. It was going to take a few weeks, so we just modified an R1 unit for it. What sucked was the time it took them to get parts from the UK or Thailand.

But of course, the dealer had most of the maintenance parts ready to go. Oils and filters. Sprokets and chains had to be ordered. Clutch cables, etc. I guess it depends on the popularity of the bike wherever you are. I'm in Sydney and they are quite popular here. Bearings, sprockets, and other parts that are not shared with other bikes took a while since they had to be ordered in. ALSO, I found it hard to buy these types of parts from after market vendors. I had to buy Triumph brand ie. Expensive.
I liked working on bikes myself. The triumph wasn't complicated. But I had to plan well ahead to make sure I had parts.

The main reasons I bought the GSXS over the other super nakeds are:
Price, Performance (Pretty much on par with the rest of them based on the way I ride. Communing and mountain stuff), Parts and maintenance can be easily done by yourself easily and affordably, and as you know info on the K5 is everywhere. Pretty much all bike shops have worked on Suzukis and have the parts right there since it is shared across so many models. Ebay parts are cheap and plentiful.

Reliability. I have mates with K5-K8 bikes going on 100,000km. No issues if fluids are changed regularly. Suspension and brakes are from the newer GSXRs, etc.

I bought the bike very well that, there is this an issue with throttle snatch. I test rode the bike and it had throttle snatch. I used that reason to get a further discount :) However, I knew that there is a way to fix it. And, if you read the TPS thread, it's a 5 minute free fix you can do on your home.
Stock exhaust sounds amazing as is.

You will also need to get a single sided swing arm stand for the speed triple.

At the end of the day , it's an emotional buy right. But the Suzuki won out because it is also super easy to live with.

What parts did you need to order? Were they common items, accessories, or uncommonly replaced pieces?

Do you know if the trouble getting them was due to the specific dealer or their supplier? I have a Triumph dealership a few miles away from me and their US headquarters is an hour drive.

The availability of Suzuki parts and service centers is certainly a bonus. Plus, a lot more people know a lot more Suzuki than they do Triumph.
 
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