GSXS 1000 Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Anyone else experienced this? I asked my dealer if it could be replaced under warranty and they asked Suzuki, but the reply from Suzuki was no as apparently this is normal and it is mentioned in the manual.

The manual does indeed state "NOTE: The headlight lens can be fogged after washing the motorcycle or riding in the rain. Headlight fogging will be cleared gradually when the headlight is turned on. When clearing the headlight lens fogging, run the engine to avoid battery discharge." but I find this fogging occurs after a dry ride where the headlight has been on all the time. My bike gets cleaned after every ride with a waterless wash, so no hose or pressure washer has ever been near it and I can't remember the last time I got caught in the rain.

I've removed the bulb to allow it to dry fully (if there is trapped moisture) and will see what it's like next ride.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I've had it since new in July '15 and I've put 3700 miles on it. It started towards the end of last year and I thought it would just clear, but it seems to be there at the end of every ride now. No visible damage to the lens / housing either. :confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks, the cover is off as I've removed the bulb and left it open to dry out, so I'll inspect the o ring around the cap. Pretty sure the lens is bonded to the housing. I'm hoping to have the fairings off this weekend, so maybe I'll remove the whole unit and inspect the seams. Strange that if this is so common why I seem to be the only one suffering from this fogging.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
You have your girl put on a terry cloth robe and do a lap dance for the GSX.
:D

Can you tell us more about this 'waterless wash'?
I was really sceptical at first as It seems like you are just swirling wet debris over your paintwork, but there's a bit more science involved and on light soiling it really does work, as long as you follow a few basic rules. I clean my bike after every ride, only takes a couple of minutes and keeps it looking good!

There are plenty around, but this is the one I'm currently using

Waterless Vehicle Wash, our own eco-friendly powerful cleaning product
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,344 Posts
Try a hair dryer. Take the bulb out, steal the wifes best hair dryer and blow warm air at the bulb hole until the dryer burns out. It doesn't take much water to make it steam up and you will need to get it all out before iit stops doing it.
Feel for you Martin. There must be a poor seal there somewhere.
Mines okay (so far) and ive been through some massive storms....the rear indicators still fill up and that problem has been from new:|:|
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Had the bulb out and the cap off since Tuesday. It all looked clear but after today's ride (only about 20 miles) the condensation was creeping back in the corners.

If I can dry it out completely, I'm not convinced it won't happen again as it was fine for the first year and nothing else has changed, so moisture must be getting in from somewhere! Still no one else seems to have had had the same problem, which also makes me think that it's faulty in some way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
370 Posts
Had same problem with my old GSx650FAK9.
Condesation appeared every time I rode that bike, even when the headlight was completely dry before the ride.

Condensation is caused when the temperature of the headlight lens is decreased compared to the temperature of the lights themselves. Once the air heated by the headlights reaches the cooler lens, moisture is formed. This creates the condensation inside of the headlight.

Take a close look to the headlight seal.
IMHO it may be broken.

Here is much info related to this issue:

Whether driving during the day or night, headlights are important for oncoming traffic to see the approaching vehicle, and also to be able to find the way when it is dark. Condensation in headlights can be a safety issue in addition to causing mechanical problems. Condensation in headlights can dim car lights making a vehicle less visible to oncoming traffic. That dimness can also result in a decreased field of vision for the driver of the vehicle. A limited range of vision, especially at night on an unknown road, can be an accident waiting to happen.

Maintaining headlight integrity is also important for the mechanics of the headlights. Condensation can cause electrical shorts and diminish the life of the headlight bulb. Headlight condensation can be prevented, but sometimes the problem has already occurred and can result in the necessity to replace headlights. If necessary to purchase replacement lights, headlights can be purchased at automotive stores, department stores with automotive departments, as well as online from the eBay Motors Light Center.

Causes of Headlight Condensation
Headlight condensation is one of the biggest problems with headlights. When condensation occurs it can discolor headlights and cause cloudiness. Both of these issues reduce visibility, especially at night. Condensation is caused when the temperature of the headlight lens is decreased compared to the temperature of the lights themselves. Once the air heated by the headlights reaches the cooler lens, moisture is formed. This creates the condensation inside of the headlight. While this is the cause for most headlight condensation, in some instances the headlights may actually be leaking around the headlight housing, or the headlight may have a crack or other type of damage that is allowing moisture to enter.

Prevention/Removal of Headlight Condensation
In order to prevent or remove headlight condensation, follow these steps to ensure that headlights are sealed properly. Properly sealed headlights will maintain headlight and lens temperatures more evenly, and will prevent outside moisture from leaking into the headlights.

Step One
Begin by removing the headlight assembly from the vehicle. Make sure to disconnect the electrical connectors and then pull the headlight out of the vehicle. Removing headlights from different vehicles will vary slightly from vehicle to vehicle; however, most removals will need similar tools. Normally a screwdriver and a ratchet are sufficient tools for the process regardless of the vehicle make and model. Make sure the ratchet has the appropriately sized socket necessary.

Step Two
Once the headlight is pulled out of the vehicle, remove the socket and headlight bulb. Make sure to remove any moisture present on the outside of the headlight. If moisture is present on the inside of the headlight, try using a blow dryer through the headlight socket. If any water is already trapped inside of the lens, a small hole may be necessary to drain the water. Use a drill to create the small hole through the bottom of the headlight assembly. Before using a drill, however, try tilting the headlight to allow water to drain through the socket hole. If the water drains sufficiently, drilling a hole may not be necessary.

Step Three
Now, inspect the headlight assembly for cracks or other damage that can allow moisture to enter. Patch any small cracks or holes with a clear urethane sealant. If there are large cracks or holes, or extensive damage, the entire headlight may need to be replaced.

Step Four
Use Teflon tape to seal around the headlight bulb socket. The tape must be applied tightly to prevent moisture from entering through the rubber socket seal. Next, replace the bulb.

Step Five
Take sealant (a flowable silicone is recommended) and find where the headlight lens meets the housing. Inspect it for any damage, and apply sealant to any small holes or cracks in those areas. Using the silicone, apply a thick line where the lens and the housing meet. Make sure to get silicone into the crease, using a needle or hair pin to help with the process if necessary. Follow around the housing with a trail of the silicone. Allow the silicone to dry for approximately one to two hours before reinstalling the headlights.

Step Six
Return the headlight assembly to the vehicle. Make sure all electrical connectors have been reconnected. Test this by turning the lights on before completing the re-installation process.

Following these six steps listed above will prevent condensation from forming in headlights. Additionally, suggestions are given within these steps to remove condensation/moisture that may already be present.

How to Remove Condensation
If condensation is already a serious problem, and there is considerable moisture within the headlights, it must be removed and then steps can be taken to prevent future condensation. In order to remove excessive condensation, follow the steps below.

Step One
Remove the headlight assembly from the vehicle. This is normally a quick and simple process, and instructions can be found in the owner's manual of the vehicle.

Step Two
Open the vehicle hood. Use safety measures to make sure that hood is propped open correctly and will stay open.

Step Three
Remove the screws, bolts, clips, etc., that will be holding the headlight assembly in place. Consult the owner's manual for the location of each of these.

Step Four
Pull the headlight assembly forward and unscrew the bulb socket assembly. Consult the owner's manual for the specific procedure to do this for the vehicle in question.

Step Five
Once the bulb and socket assembly is removed, remove the bulb from the socket. If the bulb is wet, set it aside to dry.

Step Six
For this step, a piece of cardboard and a baking sheet will be necessary. Cut the cardboard to the size of the baking sheet. Make sure to wet the cardboard with water before placing it on the baking sheet. Place the headlight assembly on the wet cardboard and slide everything into the oven. There is no need to preheat the oven, simply turn the oven to 250 degrees once the baking sheet containing the cardboard and the headlight assembly have been placed into the oven.

Step Seven
Make sure to keep an eye on the headlights, and only leave them in the oven for approximately three minutes, or whenever the condensation has fully evaporated. Use safety measures when removing the headlights as they will be hot. Lay headlights in the sun if any condensation remains. Allow the lights to dry until condensation has fully evaporated.

Step Eight
Insert headlight bulbs back into the sockets.

Step Nine
Return each headlight assembly partially into the vehicle. Screw the socket assembly, containing the bulb, into the back of each unit.

Step Ten
Slide the headlight assembly into place and secure it with the original bolts, screws, or clips removed in the beginning of the process. Make sure to consult the owner's manual for proper placement of the fasteners.

Follow these 10 steps for removal of condensation when there is too much moisture to simply dry the headlight assembly with shop towels and a blow dryer. Once this is done, go back to the steps for prevention of condensation to keep this from happening in the future. If too much damage is done to the headlights or if future condensation cannot be prevented, it may be necessary to purchase new headlights.



Conclusion
Keeping headlights in good working order is a must for drivers. Headlights make vehicles easier to be seen by oncoming traffic, and they also allow for clearer vision when driving at night. Headlights that have condensation are a safety hazard as dim headlights and can make it harder to be seen by other cars. Condensation can also lead to yellowing or cloudiness of the headlight lens thereby limiting the driver's field of vision while driving at night. Prevent condensation by taking extra care to seal headlights and bulb sockets with silicone sealant and Teflon tape.

Follow the steps provided in this guide to prevent or remove condensation. Steps are also provided for extreme cases of moisture. If the condensation cannot be prevented or stopped then it may be necessary to purchase new lights.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,235 Posts
Hi Martin,
I had a problem with the headlamp on the Gladius over time misting, but it was not from water.
Suzuki changed it out on warranty, and the second one went the same, and it was only my bike that did that in the Dealership.
The problem I think was the lamp bulb itself. It must have had an oil residue that was slowly burning off inside the lamp chamber and setting on the cooler outside which is the front of the bike. It was like a very light white oily film.

When the replacement lamp went the same way, I wiped the (same) bulb again with alcohol and manually poked a dampened rag wrapped on a stick inside the housing and wiped the Len's clean.
It took a while (couple of hours) as the bulb opening is the only way inside the lens and being careful not to scratch it.
I had changed the OEM bulb to a brighter bulb from the Car Accessories Shop, so that may be a cause by running hotter, but I am not sure of that timing years later.

The mist never came back again with the brighter bulb.

Rob.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for the replies!

The email from Suzuki GB expressly said not to touch the inside on the lens as it is coated. The condensation is very fine, so I don't think I would need to resort to 'mopping it out' anyway :)

As I had the fairings off and access was easy, I did change the OEM bulbs for these >> X-tremeVision car headlight bulb 37170328 | Philips << before the short test ride. Just need to decide what method to remove the final traces... pretty sure I won't be removing it and putting the whole assembly in the oven!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,235 Posts
Now for your info Martin, I can assume in my case that special inside coating was boiling off and re condensing as a white film.
I had no water inside at all.


Rob.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top