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Bought a new 2016 GSXS 1000 back in 2017. Ive only put about 3k on it so far. Hurricane Michael put a pause on riding. Only rode about 100 miles in the past year, but thats about to change. I had a new 2004 Kawasaki ninja zx6r 636, and then a new 2009 Kawasaki ninja zx10r after that. Im used to having my weight sitting on top of a set of narrow clip ons, so wide handle bars with light steering, and weight off my wrists vague front end when cranked over feel has definitely been an adjustment. Im thinking better tires will help. Dont take me wrong I love the bike especially where I live. I was used to canyons and interstates. Here its all traffic lights and straight roads. No need in being bent into a pretzel here.
 

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Welcome Chad!

I lived in Miami for several years in the early 90's... nothing but flat straight roads, Bike Night on Fridays at Fudrucker's Ft. Lauderdale was the big thing, then at 11 pm from there we'd all head out to the Everglades for "top end" racing, a measured 1 mile straight. There would be dozens of bikes and spectators.

First a pair of 600's would go out, rolling start, then the next challenger would take on the winner of the first race, etc, the the 750's, then the "open class". I was the open class unbeaten Champ with my GSXR-1100, built to 1206cc Cosworth motor with ram-air. Radar gunned at 198 mph!

No curves in Florida, so you work with what you got!
 

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Welcome Chad!

I lived in Miami for several years in the early 90's... nothing but flat straight roads, Bike Night on Fridays at Fudrucker's Ft. Lauderdale was the big thing, then at 11 pm from there we'd all head out to the Everglades for "top end" racing, a measured 1 mile straight. There would be dozens of bikes and spectators.

First a pair of 600's would go out, rolling start, then the next challenger would take on the winner of the first race, etc, the the 750's, then the "open class". I was the open class unbeaten Champ with my GSXR-1100, built to 1206cc Cosworth motor with ram-air. Radar gunned at 198 mph!

No curves in Florida, so you work with what you got!
What year 1100 did you own?
 

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What year 1100 did you own?
It was a 2004 GSXR-1100, built to the hilt! I developed a ram-air system before anyone knew anything about it, at the suggestion of my mechanic at the time "hey man, I saw this kit for "ram air" for your bike, you should check it out". It was a fiberglass box that enclosed the 4 carbs, with two inlets on either side. I had to mount up hoses with intake scoops up front. It made an amazing difference! I would lose to the top guy by 4 bike lengths, when I got the ram air dialed, I beat him by 4 lengths!

I'll never forget the guy looking over my bike with a flashlight and suspecting I must have Nitrous hidden somewhere, even in the frame! Yes, the good 'ol days of Florida biking! Night racing in the Everglades!
 

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Bought a new 2016 GSXS 1000 back in 2017. Ive only put about 3k on it so far. Hurricane Michael put a pause on riding. Only rode about 100 miles in the past year, but thats about to change. I had a new 2004 Kawasaki ninja zx6r 636, and then a new 2009 Kawasaki ninja zx10r after that. Im used to having my weight sitting on top of a set of narrow clip ons, so wide handle bars with light steering, and weight off my wrists vague front end when cranked over feel has definitely been an adjustment. Im thinking better tires will help. Dont take me wrong I love the bike especially where I live. I was used to canyons and interstates. Here its all traffic lights and straight roads. No need in being bent into a pretzel here.
Never heard anyone complain of vague front end feel on the GSXS while leaned over. If you are a lighter rider like me (160lbs) I can tell you the factory setting on fork preload is way to stiff. Turn your preload adjusters all the way out so you have the least amount of preload and see what a difference it makes. The best thing is to set your sag properly. But I think you will be amazed at how much more stable the bike feels when you are not riding around at the top of the fork stroke. I was having issues with the front end wagging at full throttle runs into say 100mph. I noticed if i leaned forward more the problem went away and realized the suspension was totally topped out under hard acceleration. Reducing preload cured that issue and got rid of the too light steering feel.
 
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