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I didn't mean to upset you and maybe you have been setting your suspension correctly but using the wrong terminology and I would like to ensure that anyone following this thread doesn't go the wrong way with their suspension because of a misunderstanding.

Apologies if i'm wrong with my statements, just trying to help!
You weren't wrong Paul.
 

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I have already posted this but I am similar weight but a tad shorter, and if you go to one minute seventeen seconds on this video it will give you a great setup. Print screen the card the suspenssion mechanic gives the owner. Essentially put the rear shock on the lowest preload; and set the rebound to half a click out; on the front have three rings of preload showing, and five clicks out on compression and rebound. It works brilliantly.

 

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Hi guys, how would you replicate these settings "on the front have three rings of preload showing, and five clicks out on compression and rebound." on a 2020 model? Mine does not "click" on the compression adjuster, it just turns... How would i replicate "5 clicks out" on the compression adjuster? :p Same goes for the rear btw, again it just turns, but everyone is talking about "clicks"... Why did Suzuki change this haha
Also when someone says "x clicks out" do they mean from the stock position, or does that mean i should go fully clockwise and then "5 clicks/turns" counterclockwise from there?
 

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Hi Sunde,
Your completely correct. The fork compression is clickless, as is the shock at the rear. My 2016 and current 2019 are the same in this respect.
Only the fork rebound has a 'clicker'.

Settings are taken from fully wound in. The fully wound in is 'zero' ; the first 'click' anticlockwise is then position 1.
Suzuki was quite confusing in the handbook describing the fork preload as they did. It would have been better to do what they used to do just showing the rings visible.

My favourite tip is to softly pin punch a mark on the fork big outer hex, then a mark on the preload adjuster and also the fork and shock rebound's, so when in stock position as they left the Factory, the 3 pop marks line up.
I assume that the Factory have matched the settings on some sort of machine rather than just a random place.
This makes it so easy to remember how to get back to stock quickly.
The old memory fades a bit over a few weeks when slight adjustments to rebound to the rear shock are quite noticeable.

Rob.
 

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Can't say exactly what year it happened, 2 or 3 years ago? but Suzuki removed the click function from the front suspension. For what reason is anybodies guess!
 

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I always imagine it as hours of a clock. One click equals one hour


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Once you adjust the preload you can always push down on either end individually too see how they move. It is a good method for judging how fast your rebound is.
 

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Thanks a bunch mate! I'll play around with it i guess :p. So far it all feels very stiff / tight when riding. Gonna play with less preload both front and rear, and slowing down the rebound + increasing the compression dampening a little bit.
Hi Sunde,
Could I suggest that you leave any adjustments till you have about 1,000 KM on the new bike. There is some wearing in that needs to take place to the bushes in the forks.
If you start adjustments now, you may find your adjustment results keep changing.

After this time, you may find that you need to increase the fork preload (in my case just under a quarter of a turn in) to steady the front from bobbing up and down over bums and dips.
The tight bushes sort of act as a friction damper in the early days of operation, and as they wear in, extra compression balances it back again.
The rear shock is a crude device, best for good A class road surfaces.
The adjuster seems to decrease compression and rebound in the same action. I would try leaving the spring set as stock on the preload ring, and turn the rebound screw out counter clockwise a bit. A small amount goes a long way.

Rob.
 

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Hi Sunde,
Could I suggest that you leave any adjustments till you have about 1,000 KM on the new bike. There is some wearing in that needs to take place to the bushes in the forks.
If you start adjustments now, you may find your adjustment results keep changing.

After this time, you may find that you need to increase the fork preload (in my case just under a quarter of a turn in) to steady the front from bobbing up and down over bums and dips.
The tight bushes sort of act as a friction damper in the early days of operation, and as they wear in, extra compression balances it back again.
The rear shock is a crude device, best for good A class road surfaces.
The adjuster seems to decrease compression and rebound in the same action. I would try leaving the spring set as stock on the preload ring, and turn the rebound screw out counter clockwise a bit. A small amount goes a long way.

Rob.
Hey Rob, thank you for taking your time posting this. Really good information and 100% true, it did soften up all by itself. First service has been done and i visited a racing/tuning shop that walked me thorough/helped me get it just how i wanted it. What a difference ;)
 
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