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Hey I’m Dustin from Washington state and I bought a 2018 GSXS 1000 about two weeks ago and absolutely love this bike!! Mods will be coming soon but for now I will just enjoy it the way it is. Would love to meet some local people to ride with if there is any..
 

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Hi Dustin. Awesome choice of bikes, you'll love it more each day. The bike is great right out of the box, so enjoy. Good to have you along.
 

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Hey Dustin,
Great to see a Pacific Northwesterner on here. I used to live in Hoquiam and then Olympia. Your 'dry' riding season is short so I hope you get to make the most of it while you can. Looks like you could hop a ferry and get over to Vancouver Island easily enough. Riding the island was great fun, so give that a go sometime. Your bike looks great. Hopefully you get lots of miles and fun from it. Stay dry!
 

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Hey I’m Dustin from Washington state and I bought a 2018 GSXS 1000 about two weeks ago and absolutely love this bike!! Mods will be coming soon but for now I will just enjoy it the way it is. Would love to meet some local people to ride with if there is any..
looks like the first mod has been done - fender eliminater!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I will definitely have to make it out to the island sometime one of the ferry’s is pretty close to me.

And yeah I did notice the fender eliminator when I was buying the bike, looks like that’s all that was done that I can see. I will probably do an exhaust first.
 

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NOOOOO! Not exhaust first. You do shock first. Worst piece of schizen on the bike. Spend the $500 and put a Wilbers on there and then...do whatever floats your boat after that. This is a case of "trust me on this". The OEM shock has very harsh compression (especially high-speed compression) and that will pound your kidneys into submission AND cause the bike to lose contact with the pavement at times, making it unstable and not very fast in the corners.

Think of it this way - the stock exhaust is already pretty 'throaty'. Loudest 'stock' exhaust on a Japanese sportbike I've ever heard! And the bike is already putting out about 145 horspower at the rear wheel, so there is NOTHING to be gained by messing with the exhaust just yet. So...if you have money to spend, that rear shock needs to go. It really is bad. You will thank me once you put in the Wilbers and take the bike for a ride on it. Ahhhhhh...now THAT is how the bike is supposed to ride and handle. It'll make riding Vancouver Island so much more fun! Heck, it'll make every ride more fun.


Okay. Off my soapbox now. Ha! I'm like a former smoker trying to get everyone else to stop, only I'm pimping rear shocks for some reason. I don't even get a kick-back. I really need to re-think my life...
 

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Lol. Frog, you are so predictable. Do you know anyone that has run that cheapest shock you listed? I am interested in upgrading, but don't want to spend $900.
 

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Wilbers 540 is a good value & quality shock

Lol. Frog, you are so predictable. Do you know anyone that has run that cheapest shock you listed? I am interested in upgrading, but don't want to spend $900.
There was a guy (maybe two?) that replied to a thread on here about Nitron shocks. (9 pages long now... https://www.gsxs1000.org/forum/suspension-brakes/28217-nitron.html)
They apparently went for the Wilbers 540 instead of the Nitron R1 and said they liked the Wilbers and felt it was a good value for the money. Seems Wilbers gets the valving right and the spring rate right, so that's 95% of the 'battle' right there. I think for $500, it would be money well spent. I probably should have just gone that way myself, but I'm "sensitive" to the high-speed compression, so I spent the extra to be able to adjust it. Without getting one of each and testing them back-to-back, I really can't say if I needed to do that or not. If I were pinching pennies, I'd get the Wilbers 540 without hesitation. The stock shock is just that BAD. I can't stand it. Once you've had a bike with good suspension, you just can't tolerate 'garbage' again. You get spoiled.


Uh oh...maybe that's a warning. To everyone that thinks their shock is "fine", do NOT get an aftermarket one! Once you've seen what the bike could be like, you'll never be able to go back.
 

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There was a guy (maybe two?) that replied to a thread on here about Nitron shocks. (9 pages long now... https://www.gsxs1000.org/forum/suspension-brakes/28217-nitron.html)
They apparently went for the Wilbers 540 instead of the Nitron R1 and said they liked the Wilbers and felt it was a good value for the money. Seems Wilbers gets the valving right and the spring rate right, so that's 95% of the 'battle' right there. I think for $500, it would be money well spent. I probably should have just gone that way myself, but I'm "sensitive" to the high-speed compression, so I spent the extra to be able to adjust it. Without getting one of each and testing them back-to-back, I really can't say if I needed to do that or not. If I were pinching pennies, I'd get the Wilbers 540 without hesitation. The stock shock is just that BAD. I can't stand it. Once you've had a bike with good suspension, you just can't tolerate 'garbage' again. You get spoiled.


Uh oh...maybe that's a warning. To everyone that thinks their shock is "fine", do NOT get an aftermarket one! Once you've seen what the bike could be like, you'll never be able to go back.
Maybe that's my problem. I've never ridden a bike with an aftermarket shock on it, so i don't really have an idea what I'm missing. I just go so fast that the bumps and vertabrae compressions are overcome with adrenaline. :D
 

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Maybe that's my problem. I've never ridden a bike with an aftermarket shock on it, so i don't really have an idea what I'm missing. I just go so fast that the bumps and vertabrae compressions are overcome with adrenaline. :D
Adrenaline is amazing, right? Nothing more speed can't fix. I've often said, ANY road can be entertaining if enough velocity is applied. (Sadly, I don't think the boys in blue feel the same way...)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The more I ride the bike and especially on twisty roads I can see the suspension needs some help. I’m a big guy 285 can anyone recommend some adjustments I can do to the stock suspension to help for now?
 

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The more I ride the bike and especially on twisty roads I can see the suspension needs some help. I’m a big guy 285 can anyone recommend some adjustments I can do to the stock suspension to help for now?
Hi Dustin,
I am afraid your weight plus riding gear will not be adequately compensated for with the preload, compression and rebound as found on the bike.
You probably know that as you have twirled the clickers already, but what you are looking for will need to start with new springs at both ends to get the sag back to a normal place.

The compression at both ends is pretty firm as is at both ends, but when you dial more in at the front, the rear which is unadjustable for that, will feel wrongly matched in steering turn in.
Perhaps you can get a heavier spring from the like of RaceTech Suspension and get that fitted to the rear damper and new fork springs to match.

Correct spring rates is 80% of what you are looking for, rather than a new damper, as the existing damper's too much compression would better suit the heavier spring.
The stock spring is 100 newtons/mm rate. No idea what the forks are though.

Rob.
 

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Adjusting suspension for 285lbs of rider

The more I ride the bike and especially on twisty roads I can see the suspension needs some help. I’m a big guy 285 can anyone recommend some adjustments I can do to the stock suspension to help for now?
For now, until you can order something 'good' (wilbers? k-tech? nitron?) crank in more pre-load (i.e., compress the spring more by turning adjuster at top CLOCKWISE with tool in tool bag of bike).


Next, dial in about a half turn 'stiffer' rebound on the rear shock (turn toward the "H"). That's about all you can do back there.


Now go to the front forks. Turn in the front preload adjusters until there are no lines showing (see picture.)


Next, at the bottom of each fork leg is a "compression" adjuster; take out a 1/4 turn compression (go 'softer')


Finally, at the top of each fork leg is a "rebound" adjuster; add a 1/4 turn more rebound (go 'harder')


Hopefully that helps things for now. You and I are not too far apart in weight. We really are 'too much' for the stock springs, but they can work with all the preload cranked in. Just don't put a passenger on the the bike. That would be too much for the springs and you'll bottom out on 'dips'.
 

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This suspension stuff baffles my brain a bit. I'd think you'd want the spring UNcompressed more for a heavier guy and not compressed more as the extra weight will compress it. Or is it because he'd be bouncing around otherwise?

Is 160 lbs a average guy weight or a lighter guy weight I wonder?
 

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Just a follow-up; now that we know your weight I'm going to recommend something to you I don't normally say on here and that would be to replace your front fork springs when you get a new rear shock. You want the front and rear of the bike in balance. Too soft up front will be no good just as too harsh in back (as it is now) is no good.


Any of the aftermarket shock people are going to ask you your weight and riding style. BE HONEST. Some guys want to say they are 'track riders' when they really aren't (or they went one time) and they end up getting a shock that is valved too stiff for the street and they are unhappy. Just say you are a street rider. Seriously. It'll be better.



For fork springs, most places you can buy them will have a 'calculator' where you put in your weight and then it will 'recommend' a fork spring for you. The stock fork springs in our bike are 0.87 kg/mm (stock). When you use the 'calculators' to figure out what fork spring will suit your weight, my experience is they usually suggest something that is too stiff for a street bike rider. What I have learned is whatever it 'suggests' will be a touch too stiff. For example, I weigh 255 and the calculators always tell me to get a 1.0 kg/mm spring. But when I get that, I have to take out all the preload to make it tolerable. I learned to just go down one 'weight' on spring to a 0.95 kg/mm. That just feels better to me. For your weight (285lbs), the 1.0 kg/mm spring will be perfect. If you like the ride a touch softer then normal, go for a 0.95 kg/mm spring.

Oh yeah, you want a STRAIGHT RATE spring (not a "progressive" rate spring!)

These are $63 and high quality:

https://www.ktechsuspensionusa.com/p-11746-k-tech-suspension-front-fork-spring.aspx
Order the ones labeled 10.0N weight.



With a 0.95 kg/mm or 1.0 kg/mm spring in the forks, you can put your front preload back to the middle of the adjustment range and tune from there. Also, for fork oil, I like SYNTHETIC ATF fluid. It just has the right viscosity and after a bit of 'break-in', it flows just right and never breaks down. Awesome stuff. And you can get it at any auto-parts store. (This is assuming you do this work yourself. If you go to a shop, they'll do what they want regardless of what you ask for. That's just how life is sometimes.)
 

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More preload for heavier load on bike

This suspension stuff baffles my brain a bit. I'd think you'd want the spring UNcompressed more for a heavier guy and not compressed more as the extra weight will compress it. Or is it because he'd be bouncing around otherwise? Is 160 lbs a average guy weight or a lighter guy weight I wonder?
I'm not a science guy so I can't explain WHY you put in MORE preload for a heavier weight on the bike, but you do. Someone with a more scientific background will chime in soon enough to 'splain it all to us. A lighter person (like yourself) will probably be fine at about the second preload position on the rear shock (from full soft).


At 160lbs, you are at the lower end (lighter end) of 'average'. At 150 lbs and less, we are looking at a 'light' person. (For our international viewers, I apologize for the lack of kilogram equivalents. But hey, you people are smarter than 'Mericans, so I'm sure you can do the maths in your head ;) )
 

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The preload adjustment is for adjusting sag.
For me @ 76kgs I have the sag set 30 rear and 35 front so if you can't get anywhere close to this you will need heaver springs.
There is a bit more to it than this but just trying to keep it simple.
 
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