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Discussion Starter #1
Information on how to remove these guys is very scarce around here. I removed my PAIR system and canister system yesterday and it wasn't hard and didn't require any special tools or parts (obviously, you will need PAIR blockoff plates. I used Driven Racing DSBLOCK-1, free shipping on Amazon).

Steps:

1. Remove the fuel tank:

You will have to remove the rear seat, front seat, black side covers between the tank and front seat (pull clips out, separate the Velcro, and then pull towards back of bike), side radiator covers, front tank cover, and key cover. Two bolts hold the front of the tank (do NOT over tighten these, I snapped one in half without even trying and then had to remove it from the frame....). Prop the tank (I use a cardboard box) and remove the fuel line (some fuel will spill, have a rag ready), fuel pump connector, and two hoses (wedging a Flathead screwdriver between the hoses and tank will help get them off). Then remove the bolt that holds the back of the tank and set the tank aside.

2. Remove the airbox:

Remove all hoses from the airbox as well as the sensor on the right side. Use an allen bit to loosen the clamps around each of the 4 intake runners. Unplug and remove the ECM. Pull the airbox off and set aside.

3. Remove airbox baffle (optional)

While you're at it, you can remove the airbox baffle now, if you want. Remove all of the phillips screws to pull the airbox into 2 pieces (there is also a hidden one under the ECM tray). Remove the phillips screws inside and pull the baffle out. Re-assemble the airbox.

4. Remove the PAIR system

Remove the two plates from the cylinder head and all connecting hoses. Using the plug provided with the Driven Racing plates (or similar), plug the airbox outlet. Leave the PAIR valve itself plugged in to avoid a check engine light. Ziptie it to secure it. Install the blockoff plates on top of the stock gaskets. YOU MUST REMOVE THE SCREWS from these before re-assembling, or the plates will not seal against the engine. The little reed valves come out, too. Pictures attached of this.

5. Remove the canister and purge lines

The canister is secured to a metal bracket behind the engine. You can either yank it off of the bracket or just unscrew the bracket and try to get it all out at once. Remove the hose leading from the canister down to the bottom of the bike. Unplug all hoses that were attached to the canister and purge valve. I chose to connect the purge valve to itself so that it won't get dirty, just in case ;) I attached a picture of how I did it. Next, remove the T-connector that the purge line attaches to before entering the engine intake. Remove one small section of hose and then connect all of the hoses to themselves so that no air is entering. See attached drawing. Leave the purge valve in the stock location and plugged in (again, to avoid check engine light). Remove the hose that used to go from tank to canister. We will re-use this hose on the tank side, but it will no longer attach to anything.

6. Re-assemble

Re-assembly is straightforward and pretty easy. Just use common sense :) And make sure that all vacuum lines are connected properly! When putting the tank back on, leave the rear bolt loose until the front is tightened. Otherwise it's pretty hard to line up the front bolts. As said before, attach the hose to the tank that used to be connected from the canister to the tank. But now, it will just hang underneath and let fuel vapors into the atmosphere like old bikes do. I zip-tied that hose to the water drain hose that attaches to the tank next to it.

Please ask if anything needs further detail or clarification.
 

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Great how to

Sorry if this is off topic but I'm just trying to understand, should this be done if you run a pcv and autotune? I've read comments about the autotune leaning off down low, the very reason you do this is so you can get the bike setup on the dyno with no false readings. So you essentially doing the same with the autotune, shouldn't it need to be done while it is 'learning'?

I eventually want to do all of this sort of stuff to mine but I'm just trying to learn until it's broke in and I get the ££££

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Great how to

Sorry if this is off topic but I'm just trying to understand, should this be done if you run a pcv and autotune? I've read comments about the autotune leaning off down low, the very reason you do this is so you can get the bike setup on the dyno with no false readings. So you essentially doing the same with the autotune, shouldn't it need to be done while it is 'learning'?

I eventually want to do all of this sort of stuff to mine but I'm just trying to learn until it's broke in and I get the ££££

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
Thank you!

Yes, that is exactly the idea. The trouble is that the ECM only opens the PAIR valve /sometimes/, not always. I think it's only supposed to open when the throttle is transitioning to closed. But who knows, they have been known to screw up dyno sniffers and auto tuners, and it's extra weight, so I wanted it gone.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Awesome. Are you running the OEM muffler as well? or the Akra can? I was thinking about doing this as well...looking forward to hearing your thoughts on the new headers.
I got the Arrow headers installed last night. And I'm using the OEM muffler.

I could not be happier with the result. It sounds absolutely awesome, pretty similar to stock, just way louder and much more aggressive. I was afraid it would be too loud, but it's actually JUST right. The bike is also noticeably faster now >:D
 

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I got the Arrow headers installed last night. And I'm using the OEM muffler.

I could not be happier with the result. It sounds absolutely awesome, pretty similar to stock, just way louder and much more aggressive. I was afraid it would be too loud, but it's actually JUST right. The bike is also noticeably faster now >:D
Awesome. Was the install pretty straightforward? Did you have to buy new GSX-S1000 header gaskets?
 

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You don't need to remove the Pair valve system, just use a marbel or something to block the pipe and put small clips below and above to stop it moving, I have done this on my VFR1200 after my decat. 10p or £50, hhmmm
 

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Discussion Starter #17
You don't need to remove the Pair valve system, just use a marbel or something to block the pipe and put small clips below and above to stop it moving, I have done this on my VFR1200 after my decat. 10p or £50, hhmmm
I think most people know this. The block off plates were only $35 and it's a cleaner method and weighs less. Enough reason for me but it's understandable that the marble method is favorable to others.
 

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Information on how to remove these guys is very scarce around here. I removed my PAIR system and canister system yesterday and it wasn't hard and didn't require any special tools or parts (obviously, you will need PAIR blockoff plates. I used Driven Racing DSBLOCK-1, free shipping on Amazon).

Steps:

1. Remove the fuel tank:

You will have to remove the rear seat, front seat, black side covers between the tank and front seat (pull clips out, separate the Velcro, and then pull towards back of bike), side radiator covers, front tank cover, and key cover. Two bolts hold the front of the tank (do NOT over tighten these, I snapped one in half without even trying and then had to remove it from the frame....). Prop the tank (I use a cardboard box) and remove the fuel line (some fuel will spill, have a rag ready), fuel pump connector, and two hoses (wedging a Flathead screwdriver between the hoses and tank will help get them off). Then remove the bolt that holds the back of the tank and set the tank aside.

2. Remove the airbox:

Remove all hoses from the airbox as well as the sensor on the right side. Use an allen bit to loosen the clamps around each of the 4 intake runners. Unplug and remove the ECM. Pull the airbox off and set aside.

3. Remove airbox baffle (optional)

While you're at it, you can remove the airbox baffle now, if you want. Remove all of the phillips screws to pull the airbox into 2 pieces (there is also a hidden one under the ECM tray). Remove the phillips screws inside and pull the baffle out. Re-assemble the airbox.

4. Remove the PAIR system

Remove the two plates from the cylinder head and all connecting hoses. Using the plug provided with the Driven Racing plates (or similar), plug the airbox outlet. Leave the PAIR valve itself plugged in to avoid a check engine light. Ziptie it to secure it. Install the blockoff plates on top of the stock gaskets. YOU MUST REMOVE THE SCREWS from these before re-assembling, or the plates will not seal against the engine. The little reed valves come out, too. Pictures attached of this.

5. Remove the canister and purge lines

The canister is secured to a metal bracket behind the engine. You can either yank it off of the bracket or just unscrew the bracket and try to get it all out at once. Remove the hose leading from the canister down to the bottom of the bike. Unplug all hoses that were attached to the canister and purge valve. I chose to connect the purge valve to itself so that it won't get dirty, just in case ;) I attached a picture of how I did it. Next, remove the T-connector that the purge line attaches to before entering the engine intake. Remove one small section of hose and then connect all of the hoses to themselves so that no air is entering. See attached drawing. Leave the purge valve in the stock location and plugged in (again, to avoid check engine light). Remove the hose that used to go from tank to canister. We will re-use this hose on the tank side, but it will no longer attach to anything.

6. Re-assemble

Re-assembly is straightforward and pretty easy. Just use common sense :) And make sure that all vacuum lines are connected properly! When putting the tank back on, leave the rear bolt loose until the front is tightened. Otherwise it's pretty hard to line up the front bolts. As said before, attach the hose to the tank that used to be connected from the canister to the tank. But now, it will just hang underneath and let fuel vapors into the atmosphere like old bikes do. I zip-tied that hose to the water drain hose that attaches to the tank next to it.

Please ask if anything needs further detail or clarification.
How did you get the screws out before you put the cover plates on? I can't budge them.
 
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