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Discussion Starter #1
Just put a Hyperpro SSB-022 progressive spring on the rear of my 2016 1000F last night. I weigh 225 with gear and consider myself a very aggressive street rider and I live in Central Massachusetts where the bumps are many. I can't begin to tell you how pleased I am with the performance in all categories, especially the now lack of jarring bumps.
Let me say I am not a proponent of SAG. I try to find the correct spring for my weight and riding ability and go by feel after that. This spring feels awesome. Takes away 90% of the jarring bumps and packs down in the corners beautifully. I left the recbound at 1 turn back from CW and added no preload. I figured why compress the advantages of the softer spring. I took a 25 mile ride this morning over some of the bumpiest and twisty roads I have here and I could find no faults and no need for further adjustments, which shocked me. According to Hyperpro the spring weight is 485 to 715. As you can tell I am totally over the moon. I've had several sprot bikes and they all suffer from the same jarring ride on bumpy roads NO MORE! Not cheap but $150 is well worth how the bike feels now.
 

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hi chaz, that sounds sweet, awesome outcome, ive already replaced my rear shock with a nitron r2, i was told the stock rear shock had very harsh damping as well as the too hard spring, which is why i went with full replacement, ive also installed k-tech fork valves and progressive fork springs to match the upgrade at rear, really recomend the k-teck valves, i also got their comp adjusters that allow finer tuning
 

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So Chaz,you are saying that these stellar results are from merely replacing the rear shock spring? Amazing you would realize such a radical improvement from just changing the spring and not re-valving the shock as well.
 

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The rear spring has direct relationship to what goes as vertical motion directly up your spine, way more than the from the front end. The stock Suzuki spring is a linear rate, on a rising rate linkage set up.
Hyperpro swear by their progressive rate springs as the way to go and for the OP it worked for him out of the box and that is what matter's most.

Rob.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That's exactly what I'm saying. I was amazed also, and I've owned many on and off road bikes and like to think of myself pretty up on suspension technology. I was a skeptic but it transformed the ass end of the bike without shelling out big bucks for a new shock or a shock rebuild. Most of my dirt bikes had double sets of springs to handle the small bumps and a stiffer spring for the big stuff but I never tried a progressive spring. Maybe they just found the right combo for the bike and my weight but I couldn't be happier with the change! Guess you'll have to take my word for it.
 

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Chaz, did you install the new spring? If so, how difficult was it to do?
I'm also interested in the answer. I wasn't willing to shell out 1/10 the price of the bike on a rear shock so I ended up fitting a R1 rear shock. I couldn't find a solution other than sending my shock off and have a new spring and revalve done, not cheap either.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Not too difficult...First of all watch the Youtube Suzuki GXSR600 750 1000 remove rear shock suspension easy way. The shock WILL NOT come out of the top of the swing arm like he says but I did everything he instructed except for that and the positioning of the jack.
Here's what I did:
1. I used a pit bull stand to support the swing arm with the spools at the end of the swincg arm I inserted.
2. Remove the seats
3. Unscrew the phillips head screw in the front of the side panel and pull it out of the front rubber gromit exposing the 8mm bolt holding the rear brake fluid reservoir.
4. Remove the reservoir and move it out of the way.
5. Remove all the nuts in the video...upper and lower shock and lower triangular cushion rod bolt,
6. Put the bike in 1st gear and insert a scissor jack between the rear tire and the fender positioning the jack to a 90 degree angle to the fender. Use a block of wood or the like to protect the underneath of the fender. I have a tail tidy so I placed the wood on the underside of that.
7. Move the jack slightly up and down to take the pressure off the bolts and remove them. Remember where they go and some are tight.
8. Pull the shock away from the mounts so it's free.
9. Lower the jack so that the fender is as close to the tire as possible. This lowers the frame so that the shock can now slide out on the chain side.
10. Replace the spring with the new. I used a car coil compressor but I now would have taken it too a local shop to do correctly. I put the new spring in progressive coil side up against the preload adjuster.
11. Slide the shock back in and raise the jack so that all the bolts go back in the right holes.
12. remove the jack and torque the nuts to the designated 37 and 57 ft lbs.
13 replace the brake reservoir, button up the panel and replace the seats. Remember to take the bike out of gear so it will start when you're ready for the test ride.

I didn't use any preload and I have my rebound set on 1/2 to 3/4 turn from full CW which seems to work great for me. Hyperpro suggests position 1 (softest) or 2 preload and 1/4 turn out from full CW on the rebound.

The most difficult part for me was compressing and replacing the new spring. Pull the rubber stop on the shaft down before you compress and slide the retaing ring out. I think that's all of it and then Ride and Enjoy
 

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I though I would just add some words about my home made spring compressor.

It's been in the outdoor shed for a few years, hence the surface rust. I've used it on Bandit1250S's VFR800 VTEC, TL1000R, all generations of SV650 and 1000 over many years where I had to add shim packing to adjust the preload a bit more or to fit custom springs I had made for me.
For what it's worth, I found for my then 100 KG of relaxed muscle that an 8% extra on spring tension was ideal. 10% way too much, and 5% not that much better than stock.
All the bits in the picture came from a local hardware outlet chain, Bunning's Australia.

The continuous threaded rod is 12 mm metric, 400 mm each side. I found a better length is 450 mm for when an unusually long shock is used. It's the uncompressed length that the unexpected worry when the hex runs out and there is still a bit of spring tension. It's getting it back together again !

The hex joiners are 12 mm to suit the rod, about 50 mm long.
They and the rod are used in slab concrete house construction to hold the timber roof trusses down to the slab for cyclone strength. The elliptical end plates are from the steel pipe fencing parts. 2" or 2.25 nominal pipe, I can't remember which, but I think it's 2 inch. Water pipe and fencing pipe, I think they have the same OD. In their normal use, say in a Factory, they would be dyna bolted to the concrete floor and the pipe just pushed in flush vertically as a fence upright with a pipe at the top.

The standard hole at the bottom plate is 60 mm and the size at the top is 65 mm. I hacksaw cut, ground and filed it from 60 out to 65 mm. It's the worst part of making this simple rig. Note at the bottom is a V groove (very important this) Stops the 10 mm holed head end from slipping sideways under the great pressures.
Don't under estimate the force as a 10 kg/mm spring depressed 15 mm is very dangerously powerful if it let's go at you in an instant of time.
The bottom hex's go into a vice, just for holding it at a nice working height and it allows you to tighten the top hex only as the bottom hex is locked tight with a nut on each rod and stops the natural twisting reaction.
The reason for the hex's over nuts is that it spreads the force over a longer threaded area so there is no fear of thread stripping or jamming. I deliberately did not use stainless steel hex or nuts as they are prone to galling at the thread faces and locking up, 100% undo able. The rod is a very low grade SS.

The shock goes in upside down into the jig relative how you see it sitting in the bike. In place of the top mounting bolt , I use a 10 mm steel rod from a tube spanner kit. The top plate compresses on the end of the coil spring. It doesn't touch evenly on some shocks. It pays to have the shock centered evenly as there is a lot of force in play.

The result of 20 years of use of the same parts has the top plate a little soft at the holes, so on stronger springs like the Bandit 1250, the rods bend in a bit and I slipped some thin wood between the rods and spring sides to heep it stable. You could make use of any number of rods to spread the load if you have access to a heavier plate for the bottom ellipse shaped plate that I used.
It could be 4 rods in a square say. It started use on the SV650 Series 1 which has a pretty soft spring around 6 kg/mm force.

Cutting the hole in thicker metal is a lot of work and off the shelf is easier to re manufacture at home. I have used it as needed with another type of shock the other way around too, as some shocks have an un screwable mounting clevis head adjuster (the SV650) which allows ride height adjustment at the expense of spring preload. The usual Suzuki cheap shock has the coil stopped in place by 2 semicircular washers that are best (safest) removed by a magnet on a rod, Next is a screwdriver and long nosed pliers. Just Don't use your fingers !!!!
Other springs have one circular washer and lock nuts on the chromed shaft.
The better ones, your on your own. Just don't unwind the rebound oil block part, that is not the way to go.

Rob.
 

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Glad it worked for you too Ralph.
I would suggest not to put the scissor jack under the tyre, but to jack under the swingarm, back near the chain adjuster bolts.
It doesn't move up that much, but the tyre can rotate a fraction if you don't find the bolt release point immediately as you will continue to lift up the bike.
Your rolling the bike forward against the sidestand and chocked front wheel.
It doesn't take much to get the weight off the shock.

Rob.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Only too glad to help one of my fellow riders enjoy their machine a little more. Every sport bike I've owned has had a harsh ride until you go fast in the twisties. At least with this type of spring you can enjoy the ride around town without the teeth shattering jolts. It also holds up quite well in the corners. I tip the scale at 220 lbs and I get very little oscillating in the tight stuff. I would think a lighter rider would have even better results.
 
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