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Discussion Starter #1
That sure seems like a lot. And the recommendation of 42 psi is the same whether riding single or double. My other motorcycle calls for 36.7 psi in the rear.
I never carry a passenger and only weigh 150 lbs, and have found out thru experimentation using my backside that the ride quality is WAY better at 37psi than at 40 psi. The rear shock is set for minimum preload and a half turn out from full rebound damping. The lower tire pressure greatly removes the jittery feel over small road imperfections.

What is the downside of running 5 psi below the recommended pressure?
 

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At your weight, probably not a lot, although in general the lower pressure usually equals less mileage out of the tire. Since Suzuki doesn't know who will be riding the bike when they sell it, they have to error on the safe side and use 42 since it is the max tire pressure and the highest load capacity.
 

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Honda has a requirement, for its tires, that the motorcycle must be able to hit a curb at x mph, and not suffer rim damage. Maybe Suzuki has similar?

My best guess is the tire pressure is based on the vehicles maximum load.

If you were selling motorcycles, and legally responsible for the information you printed, would you go to paper with air pressure recommendations for a 175lb rider, or use a worst case scenario setting where the rider was 300lbs and his wife 350?

I believe if I were forced to make it simple , easy, and legal, Id go with the heavyweight settings.

I think the days where they could publish the best settings for suspension, or tire pressure were 2001.
 

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42 is definitely too high especially considering the 190 tire and relatively low bike weight. Lowering it a bit will give you a bigger contact patch and smooth out the ride
 

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That sure seems like a lot. And the recommendation of 42 psi is the same whether riding single or double. My other motorcycle calls for 36.7 psi in the rear.
I never carry a passenger and only weigh 150 lbs, and have found out thru experimentation using my backside that the ride quality is WAY better at 37psi than at 40 psi. The rear shock is set for minimum preload and a half turn out from full rebound damping. The lower tire pressure greatly removes the jittery feel over small road imperfections.

What is the downside of running 5 psi below the recommended pressure?
none really, i run32 front and 24 rear , gives great grip as heats up really fast , but lose out on tyre life. If doing lots of boring straight line touring would go to 35 rear,touring + luggage + pillion + wanted better tyre life might go to 38 psi, rear and 36 front, oh and i am 160 lbs approx. [my scales only do kilos.]
 

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Do you mean your front pressure is higher than the rear?
none really, i run32 front and 24 rear , gives great grip as heats up really fast , but lose out on tyre life. If doing lots of boring straight line touring would go to 35 rear,touring + luggage + pillion + wanted better tyre life might go to 38 psi, rear and 36 front, oh and i am 160 lbs approx. [my scales only do kilos.]
 

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Do you mean your front pressure is higher than the rear?
yes, Dunlop says i can go down to 18psi in rear for track use if i want , 32psi front is as low as i want to go , to squishy if too low and loses shape and grip and steering. The rear i use has been designed to run super low for track use, and still hold its shape, and i never put more than 36 psi in front or rear using the Sport Max Dunlops
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Doesn't higher psi improve fuel economy, as well as tire life?

Technically you are correct on both counts. But at 37 psi rear, I still get about 45 mpg (US) so I am not too concerned about maximizing mileage. (its not a Prius after all, lol). And with respect to tire life, I really dont know( it probably is also connected the the weight the tire is carrying) but I will take the tire life trade off for a more comfortable, less jittery ride.
 

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Doesn't higher psi improve fuel economy, as well as tire life?
when i ride to the east coast and return , we are talking close to 9000k's with some gas stations 400k's apart. Then and only then do i care about fuel consumption and tyre life. Other wise i have 3 major concerns
1 GRIP
2 GRIP
3 MORE GRIP
PS I love the traction control on this bike, not as fancy as some brands but it has helped me out on cold slippery roads, did I mention GRIP is a priority for me.
 

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Is there a big difference in grip depending on psi? I assume you have to ride really hard to notice a difference.

I keep mine at 42 rear and 36 front as the manual recommends and I've taken some corners pretty hard (not quite knee dragging but pretty close) and it gripped fine. My riding skill is probably not high enough to notice the difference.

I know that going on gravel it's recommended to greatly reduce tire pressure but I try to avoid unpaved roads as much as possible so I'm not concerned with that.
 

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It's all down to preference and what tyres you run.
I like the psi quite high because the steering and handling feels sharper, it's just a bonus the tyres last longer and get better mpg. Never felt like I've run out of grip but then I don't ride as if I was on a track when on the road. Close but not quite.

It's like the old age question which tyres are best, everyone will have there favorites.

I would advise dropping the pressure until you start to feel it's too soft then go back up to the pressure felt best for you.

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
 

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Is there a big difference in grip depending on psi? I assume you have to ride really hard to notice a difference.

I keep mine at 42 rear and 36 front as the manual recommends and I've taken some corners pretty hard (not quite knee dragging but pretty close) and it gripped fine. My riding skill is probably not high enough to notice the difference.

I know that going on gravel it's recommended to greatly reduce tire pressure but I try to avoid unpaved roads as much as possible so I'm not concerned with that.
i almost never ride hard on public roads, i am a volunteer on track marshall at the local track in Perth, which means i get to ride for free and discounts on tyres etc.
I don't have a high level of skill or much natural talent, am not anywhere close to the fast guys and i have discovered that high pressures DO NOT work when riding fast at the track, the rear tries to spin up, and the front when pushed hard enough wants to slide, ahhhh, the extra grip is quite noticeable with the lower pressures.Am trying to get heat in to make tyre grip better. Touring am trying for the opposite, keep the heat down , hence using higher pressure :nerd:
 
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