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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've only ridden the 1000 a few times but one thing is glaringly evident - the rear shock is TERRIBLE, especially on rough roads - very difficult to control the throttle too. WHAT IS THING THING UNDER MY ASS???

What do I need to do to fix the terrible ride? I have lots of bad roads where I live. I've read lots of threads here and I'm leaning towards a Wilbers rear shock - 540, 640, or 641? Or a different brand (K-Tech, Nitron, Hyperpro)? Also, does the front end need any swapping/upgrades? Or will the rear shock suffice?

I never would have guessed that the ride quality would be WORSE moving from the 750 to the 1000, but alas, I need to deal with it now. If it helps, I'm about 225 lbs. without gear, I commute on the bike, no track days, some twisties, some highway.

Thank you guys!
 

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I've only ridden the 1000 a few times but one thing is glaringly evident - the rear shock is TERRIBLE, especially on rough roads - very difficult to control the throttle too. WHAT IS THING THING UNDER MY ASS???

What do I need to do to fix the terrible ride? I have lots of bad roads where I live. I've read lots of threads here and I'm leaning towards a Wilbers rear shock - 540, 640, or 641? Or a different brand (K-Tech, Nitron, Hyperpro)? Also, does the front end need any swapping/upgrades? Or will the rear shock suffice?

I never would have guessed that the ride quality would be WORSE moving from the 750 to the 1000, but alas, I need to deal with it now. If it helps, I'm about 225 lbs. without gear, I commute on the bike, no track days, some twisties, some highway.

Thank you guys!
As you said all of the pertinent information has been discussed and is in those threads.
Pick any reputable brand, any item that fits your budget.
Your weight and riding style will be needed when speaking to them, it's of little use here.
Apologies if this comes across as blunt but it is what it is.
Our bike has been out for 5 years and is, for the most part, unchanged.
Anything that can and would be modified on our bikes has been done and more.
The best part is, no matter what you settle on, it'll be a huge improvement.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Got it, thank you. Any difference or advantages between the internal/external reservoir designs?
 

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Got it, thank you. Any difference or advantages between the internal/external reservoir designs?
Remote reservoir shocks offer better cooling to eliminate suspension fade when things get hot.
Many of them also offer more adjustability such as high and low speed compression damping.
I went with the Wilbers 641 and i couldn't be happier. I like the idea of having total control over the settings.
In saying that i haven't touched a single thing after i installed it. Probably could have saved $$
and bought the lower spec model but the external reservoir does look sexy when i take off my seat :LOL:
 

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I've only ridden the 1000 a few times but one thing is glaringly evident - the rear shock is TERRIBLE, especially on rough roads - very difficult to control the throttle too. WHAT IS THING THING UNDER MY ASS???

What do I need to do to fix the terrible ride? I have lots of bad roads where I live. I've read lots of threads here and I'm leaning towards a Wilbers rear shock - 540, 640, or 641? Or a different brand (K-Tech, Nitron, Hyperpro)? Also, does the front end need any swapping/upgrades? Or will the rear shock suffice?

I never would have guessed that the ride quality would be WORSE moving from the 750 to the 1000, but alas, I need to deal with it now. If it helps, I'm about 225 lbs. without gear, I commute on the bike, no track days, some twisties, some highway.

Thank you guys!
I went with a Wilbers 641 and ECU flash (Dano's). G2 throttle Tamer or 2019+ throttle tube if you want a bit more control in the lower revs.

Sent from my SM-N960U1 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I already have a G2 throttle tamer and an ECU flash from Dano's, so got those covered. Just need to pick out a shock now!
 

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Have you attempted to adjust the shock? Maybe it won't be enough for your personal taste but I softened the rebound on mine and it's acceptable, from stock it would bounce me off the seat on a good bump.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I did have it on the 2nd highest preload, so maybe I could try bumping it to level 1 and see what happens. Although I thought that it was the shock that was the issue, not the spring preload?
 

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To be clear you were saying preload, preload is adjusted by rotating the ring at the spring. Rebound is adjusted at the very bottom of the shock down where the linkage is. Softening rebound will help with the tossing you up off the seat on choppy roads
 

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Discussion Starter #13
To be clear you were saying preload, preload is adjusted by rotating the ring at the spring. Rebound is adjusted at the very bottom of the shock down where the linkage is. Softening rebound will help with the tossing you up off the seat on choppy roads
Well I'll be - didn't even realize the stock rear shock has rebound adjustment - missed that in the manual! Thank you, I will play with that setting as well.
 

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The OP really needs a heavier spring to suit his riding weight. The aftermarket spring will need this to be specified on the order.
Japanese sports bikes are set up for 68 KG rider. Sports Tourer a bit more, but not that much more.
Adjusting re bound/compression to overcome a too soft spring will not achieve the bliss of a magic carpet ride that we all hope for.
The correct spring rate is the start of the journey. The gsx-s1000 is 10kg/mm.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
OK so just to be clear - even at max preload, the stock spring will not work for my 100kg body weight? And are you suggesting I only change the spring out for a different one using the stock shock? Or replace the shock altogether with a new unit that has a weight-matched spring?
 

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Let's also remember the OP stated he is a commuter, occasional back road rider. Try the stock shock out, soften the rebound and see how you feel, don't go assuming you must spend $1000 to be happy. I'm in his neighborhood for weight and mostly commute and have an acceptable relationship with the shock.
Also, there is NO compression adjustment.
I'll not call you silly for spending on what makes you happy, but I'll always suggest working with what's there first.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Let's also remember the OP stated he is a commuter, occasional back road rider. Try the stock shock out, soften the rebound and see how you feel, don't go assuming you must spend $1000 to be happy. I'm in his neighborhood for weight and mostly commute and have an acceptable relationship with the shock.
Also, there is NO compression adjustment.
I'll not call you silly for spending on what makes you happy, but I'll always suggest working with what's there first.
Wholeheartedly agree - I'm not trying to spend money on stuff I don't need. I just checked the rebound and it was super stiff, so I backed it off almost all the way, we'll see how that goes. Thanks!
 

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Wholeheartedly agree - I'm not trying to spend money on stuff I don't need. I just checked the rebound and it was super stiff, so I backed it off almost all the way, we'll see how that goes. Thanks!
If the OEM spring was replaced (8 to 10% stiffer), the damper part would have to travel less on compression and rebound. The stock damper has far too much compression for most people's liking, but it's unadjustable
With these cheapo dampers, the adjuster has an effect on both compression and rebound.
The effect of too much compression is like a kick in the seat of the pants when jolted by a sharp rise under the rear wheel. The front forks also have a strong compression set up.
Too much rebound will be like on ice skates.
I would play with sag at both ends, then compression at the front first, and then rear rebound.
The important thing is that the the shock damper part is as cheap as dampers go. The Suzuki expectation is that you have great roads to travel on, and replace at every 10,000 km the rear shock, and replace the fork oil at the same time.
There is no way they test these sort of bikes anywhere outside Japan and their own racetrack.

Rob.
 

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Please see this post.
Have used same settings and it works for me.
My weight is around 200 lbs with gear on.
 

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Remote reservoir shocks offer better cooling to eliminate suspension fade when things get hot.
Many of them also offer more adjustability such as high and low speed compression damping.
I went with the Wilbers 641 and i couldn't be happier. I like the idea of having total control over the settings.
In saying that i haven't touched a single thing after i installed it. Probably could have saved $$
and bought the lower spec model but the external reservoir does look sexy when i take off my seat :LOL:
Enquired about the 640 today , the 641 is something I'd obviously like to have ; I'm a sucker for tweaking however I do NOT race & think the 641 maybe somehwat overkill for the road but for me to spend £500 on the shock knowing in a year that an extra £200 would get me Compression control makes me think to heck with it .

You mention that you could have gone with the 640 , in hindsight would you go for the 640?

How much of a difference have you noticed?

Does it fit straight in (The Nitron appears to need to much messing with)?

I'm probably going to go for the 640 unless research pushes me toward the 641!

Thanks in advance(y)
 
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