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Discussion Starter #1
You can do gymkhana on any bike, but I'd like to think our bike has some features that make it especially adept at low-speed maneuvers at big lean angles (fat torque at low rpm, mass centralization).


This guy is awesome:
 

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The rider is definitely not a rookie!

Another different type of competition, I think it’s called Slolom, I take bow to slalom-san
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The guy's name is Sakuta, and there's a ton of YouTube videos of him competing in gymkhana on a GSXS and he does some amazing things on it.
He even has his own website and sells his own brand of crash bars that you see on it.
 

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I have been doing gymkhana where I live since 2008. The GSXS would be great... but you have to accept you will probably crash once every practice session. The thought of doing that to my bike makes my stomach turn. I have a DRZ SM which was built to drop. The skills learned transfer to any bike you ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
More Sakuta; and a dude on a red GSXS

Here's another Sakuta video. He never uses the clutch (he keeps his finger on it, but never uses it). Instead, to circle a cone, he uses mostly front brake (to induce severe lean), maybe some rear brake, and then uses the throttle to prevent the bike from falling to the ground (that fat torque available at idle probably helps). I don't think he ever gets his bike past 4k rpm when he's rounding a cone. Anyway, he executes some of the fastest u-turns and figure 8's I've ever seen.






And here's a red GSXS (not as fast as Sakuta, but still pretty good).


 

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In that second Sakuta video you can see that he depends on the bike's traction control to keep things under control during hard acceleration out of the corners while still leaned way over. Several times I can see the rear end starting to hang out wide and getting arrested by the TC (very obvious at 54 seconds into the video).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
In that second Sakuta video you can see that he depends on the bike's traction control to keep things under control during hard acceleration out of the corners while still leaned way over. Several times I can see the rear end starting to hang out wide and getting arrested by the TC (very obvious at 54 seconds into the video).

I saw that part about TC intervention. I guess it really works. I'm not brave enough to try it at that lean angle though, haha. I ride mine at level 2 TC mostly. When I started I rode in level 3 for about a month until I got comfortable. I don't know if there's much difference between level 2 and level 1. I don't think I'd ever ride with TC off.
 

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The only time I'd turn the traction control off is if I wanted to do a smokey burnout. Otherwise...I could have just bought an old CBR liter bike. The beauty of the GSX-S is the traction control (and ABS on most models.) That's what I wanted - a comfortable "sportbike" but with TC and ABS. Why? I've had crashes where TC would have saved me from flipping a bike and getting knocked out, suffering a concussion and I've had crashes where ABS would have stopped the front wheel from washing out and slamming me to the pavement and dislocating my shoulder (twice! both sides...)


I'd love to say I'm such a skilled rider now, after 32 years of two-wheeled fun, that I don't "need" these rider aids. And I don't, 99.5% of the time. But when Bambi shoots in front of me, out of nowhere, I want that ABS because you grab a handful of brake initially out of adrenaline and panic and the ABS will save you from yourself.


I want the TC because there is always something in the corners (gravel, dust, leaves, oil, mystery fluid) that is looking to catch you out when you are getting on the gas. My 'highside' concussion came leaving a stop sign a little too 'enthusiastically' on a brand new Bridgestone tire. It spun up, the back of the bike started to come around, but I refused to roll off (to prevent a high side) and that's all I remember. I woke up in the ditch with my buddy standing over me, worried I had died. Didn't know where I was, what day it was, or how to get back to my house and we were less than 1/2 mile away. So...I love traction control! Wish I had it sooner. Besides, it's been a lot of fun seeing how hard I can exit a corner before triggering the traction control. All fun and games.



But that's just me. I'm sure turning it off makes sense to some people, for some reason. I just don't know what that reason would be. You can set it to allow the rear end to drift a fair amount. Going to "OFF" just seems to be inviting trouble you don't need to have. Whatever people choose, be safe and try to keep the rubber bits against the pavement. When they depart, things get really exciting, and not in a good way.
 

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I raced motocross for many years and road raced for a few. I don't really want ABS or especially TC when I race.
But for street where you're sometimes at the mercy of outside influences I'd prefer to have the safety net of both.

Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
 

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Yes. And here is the 'irony'. World Super Bike (WSBK)? They are using traction control. MotoGP? They are using traction control. Traction control gets used by the best road racers in the world because it allows them to use the bike to its maximum potential. And that's on a track. Can't see any reason to NOT be using it on the street...unless a smokey burnout needs to be dialed up to get rid of the OEM D204 tire faster?
 

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I’m not saying you cannot be faster with squid rider nannies, I just love the involvement of doing those things myself. And, I love the affect of reducing throttle, not chopping throttle, when the rear wheel slides out of a corner- for example. You become a better rider learning to do those things with your hands and feet in my opinion. I’m also 50 years old, and fondly remember when hands and feet were all we had. Learning rider skills and techniques do not necessarily make you faster on a track than letting electronics control your bike for you. Crazy thing about the super responsive throttle on the GSXS: learning to use it as is for me, has made riding all of my other bikes even better. It has improved my right hand/throttle control on my RC51, my TL1000, my SV1000S, and my two SV650S ‘s. I’m not racing WSB or Moto GP, so I’m not trying to improve my lap time on my way to work. Just having fun is what it is all about for me. I will sometimes turn on traction control if I am stuck riding in a heavy down pour, but usually I just adjust my riding to cope with it. This is how we did it before the nannies showed up. Watching my son learn to ride, makes me appreciate what those nannies do for someone who is still skill building. They do keep them safe on a very powerful bike like this one. But, watching him hone his skills on a very analog, first generation SV650S is much more rewarding for me and him. He is becoming quite competent very quickly. I have seen him recover from a possible low side with skill. I also have seen him drop his bike just maneuvering it around the garage taking it off the lift. Luckily, no damage from that learning experience!�� mine stays off because I enjoy the challenge of controlling the bike- or not if it goes wrong!
 

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The TC on this bike is not lean angle sensitive, I wouldn't go counting on it saving you while laid over. I go TC off all the time so long as it's hot and dry.
 

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It is the ABS that is not 'lean angle sensitive' on this bike, so it might not 'save' you if you grab a handful while leaned over in a corner.
The Traction Control works at all lean angles.

The lawyers have some statement Suzuki posts about the traction control being unable to save you from all crashes. Well...duh! But they gotta say stuff like this or get sued. Heck, BMW is getting sued because the gear indicator isn't working on some bikes. Crazy. America - home of the lawsuit.
 
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