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I saw this on the news this AM. Weird. Sad. You just never know when your time is going to be up. I never used to worry too much about lightning (denial, I know) and then I moved to Colorado and shortly thereafter a guy up in Denver got killed by lightning while on his motorcycle:
ESD Journal - lightning strike motorcyclist lightning lightning
That freaked me out. Then, while trying to find that article, I came across several more news stories from all over the USA about motorcyclists being killed by lightning. Danger is real. I think I'll try to find shelter next time I'm riding and the bright, loud, shiny stuff appears in the sky.
God Speed to the Florida rider and his family. Has to be such a shock (no pun intended, I swear!)
 

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Crazy. The possibility didn't even occur to me as I used to ride rain or shine back in the day. Sad.

Sent from my SM-N960U1 using Tapatalk
 

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Rubber tires aren't a good insulator because there's carbon black in the rubber. But even if the rubber was a proper insulator, it wouldn't be of any use when the working voltage is high enough to jump any distance greater than the height of the tire section. Lightning is high enough voltage to jump a distance of several miles, so the section height of a tire wouldn't even be noticed by a bolt of lightning.
 

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I thought that riding on rubber tires afforded some protection. But I guess it did not help that poor guy.
Nah. If it can make it from the clouds to the rider, it can make it through the rider and bike to the ground. You're safe in cars because you're typically not electrically grounded while in the car, and the frame and bodywork make a faraday cage, spreading the lighting around you, before it jumps from the car to the ground...
 

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Thank y’all for the info... I will be watching those dark clouds with a bit more concern from now on.
 

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Also, if it was raining, water is an excellent conductor. I watched a friend of mine get hit by lightning on a bike in Florida. Laid him on his back on the seat, but the bike took the hit. It was a custom Harley, and it had to be trailered after. He was dazed, but came to just before going into the grass on the side of the road and made a controlled stop. There was no electric power in the bike after that. He spent over $1000 getting it running again.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Also, if it was raining, water is an excellent conductor. I watched a friend of mine get hit by lightning on a bike in Florida. Laid him on his back on the seat, but the bike took the hit. It was a custom Harley, and it had to be trailered after. He was dazed, but came to just before going into the grass on the side of the road and made a controlled stop. There was no electric power in the bike after that. He spent over $1000 getting it running again.
Got hit by lightning and still landed the bike. That dude's awesome.:eek:
 

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Wow. He was lucky.

I did not think I could be more of a “fair weather’’ rider but there is always room for improvement.
 

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I’ve always been a dry weather rider. I can take the heat, cold, but I hate cleaning a bike after riding in the rain. I also hate wet roads after the rain. Cars kick up some field grade filth all over me. I can’t see out of a filthy visor!

Wow. He was lucky.

I did not think I could be more of a “fair weather’’ rider but there is always room for improvement.
 

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Living in Florida myself I am always cautions of lightning, especially since we are lightning capital of America. It bad

enough cagers trying to kill us now mother nature.
 
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