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Discussion Starter #1
In the manual it says it just checks for slipping wheel.

Does that mean that it won't prevent a flip?

I'd like to practice a wheelie but I would like the TC to help me in case it gets out of control.
 

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I think it may not allow it due to the difference in the speed of the two wheels, I think it may be turned off altogether. Next time I am riding I will try it out.
 

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You can get a small wheelie in TC1 so long as you've got some speed. It's not like the sophisticated anti-wheelie systems, just measures speed differential front/rear
EDIT: I should clarify, TC1 will kill the wheelie once the front wheel slows down, you won't be able to carry it down the street.
 

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TC1 will definitely still let you wheelie a scary amount, it just generally won't let you wheelie when you want to wheelie, at least in my experience. With TC off, I can just punch the throttle about midway through the rev range in 1st and it will pick up. In TC1, when doing a pull against another bike for instance, sometimes it will pick up like a rocket towards the end of the rev range, particularly when going over small bumps. I came VERY close to looping mine with TC1 still on. TC2 will let the front end pick up, but it will put it down fairly quickly. It will still let it get off the ground enough to give you a fright if you're not prepared for it.

If you want to practice wheelies, IMO, turn TC fully off and practice them in first gear using just engine power.
 

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The traction control on these bikes is basic but works well.....if you know it's on. Myself being over enthusiastic sometimes, when I want a boat load of power to entice the front end up like I did on my cbr1000rr, i forget it's on and it slams the front down almost blowing the fork seals. My experience is the quicker it goes up the quicker it goes down. I ride with it off 90% of the time, i put it on if the road is sketchy or the weather turns bad, never needed it for the last 11years but good to have when the weather turns to pants.

Sent from my POCOPHONE F1 using Tapatalk
 

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....I'd like to practice a wheelie but I would like the TC to help me in case it gets out of control.
by the sounds of it, it seems you are only getting into wheelies now,
my advice would have been to cover the rear brake and catch it when it goes over the balance point, but that takes a lot of close calls and practice to get used to that feeling,

I would rather say to just buy an old POS and practice with that, as the panels on our bikes are stupid expensive,
once you feel comfortable, then turn TC off and enjoy your bike, these bikes love to stand on one wheel... ;)
I had a small slide on mine(not wheelie related) but 3 panels cost more than my entire race bike's fairing kit
 

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Traction control is not wheelie control. Traction control monitors the difference in wheel speed, and will cut power if the rear wheel spins faster than the front. Indirectly, this applies to wheelies as the front wheel will slow down when it lifts off the pavement. The bike will respond by cutting power, thus bringing the front end down. Of course, you can still rev it up to red line and dump the clutch, and the traction control will likely not save you.

Wheelie control, on bikes with fancier electronics, uses sensors to detect the angle of the bike. It will allow a certain amount, and intervene accordingly. Much less abruptly than traction control does. Again, any sensor can be defeated, so don't rely on them to save you no matter what you do. Even bikes with wheelie control aren't meant to be used to practice stand up wheelies. The idea is to allow maximum acceleration without looping the bike.
 
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