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I'm about 75kg and I find 36f 38r to be best for the type of riding I do, but I can't see how anyone can get that sort of mileage if they're using the bike for its intended purpose
I'm the same weight and run the same pressures.
I've never had more than 5000mls out of any rear tyre on this bike, usually around 4000/4500mls.
I am now at around 36000mls. Last five pairs have been Metz Roadtech 01s, brilliant tyres.
 

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I have been using Dunlops: Q3+ on the front and Roadsmart III on the rear. I get about 6500 - 7000 miles on each on Florida roads using 34 psi front and 38 psi rear.

Very happy with this combo. I don't see how any tire can last 18k miles. At least not on Florida roads.
 

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I have been using Dunlops: Q3+ on the front and Roadsmart III on the rear. I get about 6500 - 7000 miles on each on Florida roads using 34 psi front and 38 psi rear.

Very happy with this combo. I don't see how any tire can last 18k miles. At least not on Florida roads.
I’ve been using combos like that for years, supersport up front, sport touring in the rear. I have to replace the front about halfway through, so two fronts to a rear. Great grip with the one that it’s most important for.
 

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I like that combo too. I thought about doing the same. My OEM rear was done way before the front so initially I just replaced the oem rear with the Road smart III. When it came time for the front I debated whether to buy the Q3 or matching RS III. I bought the RS because it has good grip even when its wet and cold. Little warm up is needed for them to stick good. I figured the Q3 would never get up to temp during late season riding on cold roads and could get sketchy. So far the RS front has not ever surprised me in any way other than developing a loud hum, but that was due to the psi being at 30psi. Filled to 36 and no more noise.
 

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Per page 117 of the owners manual, the factory recommended COLD tire pressures for the GSX-S1000 is 36F and 42R. That is for solo and two-up riding.
https://www.manualslib.com/manual/1063571/Suzuki-Gsx-S1000.html?page=117
I used to run just those pressures on my CBR929 and CBR954 but realized they were a touch too 'firm' for solo riding when I was getting my freak on in the curves. With experimentation, I found I liked about 34F and 39R (again, COLD) when riding by myself, with no luggage, and being aggressive/having fun with the bike. The GSX-S1000 seems to like those pressures, too. But I'm a 'big boy' (250 lbs) so I need a bit more pressure than the next guy, I'm sure.



If you put someone on the bike with you, please(!) use the factory recommended 36F/42R. If you are riding on a trip and have the bike loaded up with luggage, again, the factory pressures are going to give you a better safety margin and a bit more tire life.


When I was doing track days, they suggest you lower your tire pressures. I started off with what they recommended (30F/28R) and found I did not like the way the bike felt at all. I experimented and found I needed the front to be at 32 psi COLD to 'feel' right (to me.) I also figured out that 28R psi was too low and 30R psi felt 'right' at the track for me, using the tires I had (usually Michelins.)



Again, I would never run those track pressures on the street! AND, it should be pointed out that running those pressures at a track day ruined a set of Michelin Pilot PURE tires I had. They were never grippy on the street after that track day. In fact, they felt so slippery I had to replace them well before their tread life was used up. The heat from the low pressures at the track day ruined them. I will note that those tires didn't remain in Michelin's line-up for very long, so I suspect I wasn't the only one that experienced that 'problem'.


So what should YOU run? You decide. I wouldn't go below 33F/36R on my street bike rides. And - keep in mind - tires are losing air pressure constantly. If you run such low pressures, you need to check them more often because you are on the edge of safety. If you filled your tire a week ago, I would bet they have dropped by a psi or two already since then. True story. Check it out for yourself. I had one tire that lost air faster than that (about a psi every two days) but I never could find a leak or object in the tire. That's just the way it was for that particular tire. Kind of a pain.


Another consideration is that different maker's tires feel different. Bridgestones seem to have 'stiffer' carcasses than Michelins in my experience. I can run a Michelin at 33F/36R and it will feel just a touch too soft and mushy in cornering until it really gets warmed up. But a Bridgestone at those pressures would feel great to me. That being the case, I would put a bit more air in the Michelins to get the 'feel' I'm used to because of the slightly softer carcass/sidewalls. Can't speak for all the other brands (they vary, as you would imagine) but those two are very distinct from each other, so they make good examples.


Final thought - the lower you run your tire pressures, the hotter they will get and the greater INCREASE in pressure you will get once they are hot. For example, imagine you ran your front tire at 30psi COLD; after riding around for an hour, you jump off the bike and check it and find it is now up to 36psi HOT. That represents a 20% increase in pressure from hot to cold. That is too much. You are running the tire at too low a pressure. Let's then say you then run the tire at 33psi COLD and after an hour of riding around you get off and check the pressure and find it is 36.5 psi HOT. That represents about a 10% increase in pressure from hot to cold and that is what you are looking for - a 10% change from hot to cold.


Ride safe. Have fun. Live the dream.
 

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Per page 117 of the owners manual, the factory recommended COLD tire pressures for the GSX-S1000 is 36F and 42R. That is for solo and two-up riding.
https://www.manualslib.com/manual/1063571/Suzuki-Gsx-S1000.html?page=117
I used to run just those pressures on my CBR929 and CBR954 but realized they were a touch too 'firm' for solo riding when I was getting my freak on in the curves. With experimentation, I found I liked about 34F and 39R (again, COLD) when riding by myself, with no luggage, and being aggressive/having fun with the bike. The GSX-S1000 seems to like those pressures, too. But I'm a 'big boy' (250 lbs) so I need a bit more pressure than the next guy, I'm sure.



If you put someone on the bike with you, please(!) use the factory recommended 36F/42R. If you are riding on a trip and have the bike loaded up with luggage, again, the factory pressures are going to give you a better safety margin and a bit more tire life.


When I was doing track days, they suggest you lower your tire pressures. I started off with what they recommended (30F/28R) and found I did not like the way the bike felt at all. I experimented and found I needed the front to be at 32 psi COLD to 'feel' right (to me.) I also figured out that 28R psi was too low and 30R psi felt 'right' at the track for me, using the tires I had (usually Michelins.)



Again, I would never run those track pressures on the street! AND, it should be pointed out that running those pressures at a track day ruined a set of Michelin Pilot PURE tires I had. They were never grippy on the street after that track day. In fact, they felt so slippery I had to replace them well before their tread life was used up. The heat from the low pressures at the track day ruined them. I will note that those tires didn't remain in Michelin's line-up for very long, so I suspect I wasn't the only one that experienced that 'problem'.


So what should YOU run? You decide. I wouldn't go below 33F/36R on my street bike rides. And - keep in mind - tires are losing air pressure constantly. If you run such low pressures, you need to check them more often because you are on the edge of safety. If you filled your tire a week ago, I would bet they have dropped by a psi or two already since then. True story. Check it out for yourself. I had one tire that lost air faster than that (about a psi every two days) but I never could find a leak or object in the tire. That's just the way it was for that particular tire. Kind of a pain.


Another consideration is that different maker's tires feel different. Bridgestones seem to have 'stiffer' carcasses than Michelins in my experience. I can run a Michelin at 33F/36R and it will feel just a touch too soft and mushy in cornering until it really gets warmed up. But a Bridgestone at those pressures would feel great to me. That being the case, I would put a bit more air in the Michelins to get the 'feel' I'm used to because of the slightly softer carcass/sidewalls. Can't speak for all the other brands (they vary, as you would imagine) but those two are very distinct from each other, so they make good examples.


Final thought - the lower you run your tire pressures, the hotter they will get and the greater INCREASE in pressure you will get once they are hot. For example, imagine you ran your front tire at 30psi COLD; after riding around for an hour, you jump off the bike and check it and find it is now up to 36psi HOT. That represents a 20% increase in pressure from hot to cold. That is too much. You are running the tire at too low a pressure. Let's then say you then run the tire at 33psi COLD and after an hour of riding around you get off and check the pressure and find it is 36.5 psi HOT. That represents about a 10% increase in pressure from hot to cold and that is what you are looking for - a 10% change from hot to cold.


Ride safe. Have fun. Live the dream.
I like it all Frog... good advice, I'm one of those low psi guys with a thick head. 4 rear tires in 11 months, but I do ride a lot...I'm going to force my self to do the factory recommended psi for this next set and see how it goes.

Haven't heard from you in a while...always like your inputs. :)
 

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I like it all Frog... good advice, I'm one of those low psi guys with a thick head. 4 rear tires in 11 months, but I do ride a lot...I'm going to force my self to do the factory recommended psi for this next set and see how it goes. Haven't heard from you in a while...always like your inputs. :)
Thanks for the kind words. I've been busy lately and haven't had a lot of free time to visit, but I still pop in to see what's new periodically.

As for you and your riding pressures, I used to run with a group of guys in the Biloxi/Gulfport, MS, area and it was like a track day on the street every time we went out. I look back now and think how crazy (and lucky we were) to survive those shenanigans. But I could totally see running YOUR pressures when I was running with that crew.

I'm sure once you try the factory pressures of 36F/42R, you are going to find the ride to feel stiff and the bike will feel 'off' at first. Try taking out some spring pre-load at each end of the bike to help out a bit. Might take out some compression dampening up front, too (like a 1/4 of a turn.) That will help. You should definitely see more tire life from the higher pressures. It's just a matter of - can you get used to it and live with it? If nothing else, maybe you come to find you CAN live with a compromise pressure in between what you run now (pretty low) and the factory pressures (which can feel too high if it's just you on the bike and you aren't a fat dude like me.) Something like 34F/38R? That would give you better tire life, but still give you a decent ride and grip. You'll have to report back in six months or so and let us know how things worked out.
 

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My rule of thumb is a 4-6 psi increase from cold to hot indicate that the tyre is with in its working range and that is what I look for. Just my thing.
 

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I am new to this forum and have been riding for 53 years and have logged over 500,000 miles. I am now 72 and I got my first sport bike at 63, a BMW K1300S. I never got more than 3000 miles out of a variety of different brands of tires. I have used Pirelli Angel GTs, Michelin PR3s, Bridgestones, and Dunlops. In my experience Dunlops suck except on Harleys which I also have ridden my entire riding life. My new 2018 Suzuki GSX S1000F came stock with Dunlop SportMax which I have my doubts about based on my past experience. I also have a 2014 Kawasaki Concours, 2008 Gold Wing, and 1997 Heritage. The Wing does best on Bridgestones (7000 mi). The Harley on Dunlops and the Kawi on Pirellis. I never got more than 3000 mi on any tire I put on the Concours. I'm excited about my new Suzuki and I'm looking forward to trying the different tire brands and pressures recommended here. In closing I would like to say that this is the first chain driven bike I've had since my 1980 Harley Wide Glide. When I rode it home from the dealer (2 hrs away) I was awed at the instant, raw power of the chain driven GSX 1000. I appreciate all the great information ya'll provide.
 

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Hey rock3822, good to have you here. It looks like you have a lot of riding experience! For what it is worth, the OEM Dunlop D204 tires that come on the GSX-S1000 are not the greatest tires. Their best attribute is they wear out quickly so you can slip on some much better rubber sooner rather than later. Not all Dunlop rubber is crap though. I've had D208s that were really quite good until the last 500 to 800 miles and then the grip fell off. But like you, I tend to avoid Dunlop rubber when looking for replacement tires.


Generally I've been happy with Michelin, Metzeler, and Pirelli products. But as you noted, tires on a 145 rwhp bike don't live a long life. I rarely see more than 4000 miles from a rear tire; usually less. Probably my weight and riding style that leads to the quick death of rubber. But getting a sportbike and whining about tire life is like getting a supermodel wife and then crying about other men hitting on her - you made your choices and this is the life that comes with it.


I hope you enjoy your Gixxus and we look forward to hearing more from you.
 

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Stock is an outlier on the s21s, 8-10k for front and hate to agree with frog, 4k for the rear. Fantastic dry hot weather grip, never felt comfortable in corners in the wet though. Moved to the road5 in the front and it's noticeably more competent in cold/wet, will go to r5 on rear when s21 dies.
 

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Discussion Starter #55 (Edited)
Another set done and dusted. Last time I tried Metzeler M7, never liked them even when new, when worn about 5k km terrible, bike wouldn't turn especially slow corners, roundabouts were a nightmare, to stop the front turning in required a lot of countersteer which would really unsettle the whole thing. Went back to the Bridgestone 016, went for a ride through the twisties, like it's on rails,turns effortlessly. Think I'm in love again
 
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