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They can get up to 500 degrees but normally under abuse you'll see 200-250


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I get the "up to" numbers, but at the same time I see a lot of ppl riding with the shock canisters zip-tied to the frame. ATV folk often use nylon straps to secure those cans. Apparently, the typical working temperatures don't get high enough to affect the stability of these plastics, probably lower than 150.

But then again, those are well-vented areas. This is why I am curious how hot the reservoir really gets after a ride when mounted under the seat. If it's not too hot for a finger to touch, I would be ok with that
 

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I get the "up to" numbers, but at the same time I see a lot of ppl riding with the shock canisters zip-tied to the frame. ATV folk often use nylon straps to secure those cans. Apparently, the typical working temperatures don't get high enough to affect the stability of these plastics, probably lower than 150.



But then again, those are well-vented areas. This is why I am curious how hot the reservoir really gets after a ride when mounted under the seat. If it's not too hot for a finger to touch, I would be ok with that


The main concern is oil heating and aging prematurely. So the cooler it is the longer it'll last and work.


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Actually i will share a secret with you , for keep track of temperature peak on few components (as brake) you can use thermo sticker (or thermo paint)
and
As i am a professional test driver , i have plenty (and more raffinated ) of those
reservoir of my shock did not even hit 74° BTW
 

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I think all this stuff about shock oil overheating is a bunch of BS (my engineering opinion). The reservoir was added to shocks to allow room for a gas/oil separator without increasing the length of the shock. DeCarbon shocks have a separator inside the standard length, and therefore have significantly reduced travel.

The shock on our bike is mounted inches away from the exhaust. And in that area the air is relatively stagnant - air is blocked from the front by the frame, and from the sides by the rider. It's also not far from engine components which generate more heat. So there isn't much cooling at all where the majority of the oil is located

If cooling was the concern, I think we would see 'finned' reservoirs at the very least, or a design that concentrates the nitrogen to the inside of the reservoir, and the oil to the outside.

On bikes that come with reservoir shocks, they usually come with a piggy back reservoir which doesn't do squat for cooling (mounted in same location as shock). The remote reservoir is used to allow a reservoir where there's no room on the shock - like on our bike - or because it's cheaper than fabricating a fancy bracket at the top of the shock.

Geez, as I'm thinking about this:
How much oil do we think is really flowing to/from the reservoir? Most of the shock oil flows from one side of the piston to the other, inside the shock. The gas in the reservoir adds general pressure to keep the oil from cavitating as the shock extends. Shock travel shouldn't be compressing the gas enough to allow that much fluid flow - or there shouldn't be that much gas to allow that to happen.

The point is - the flow from the shock to the reservoir is a small amount, and the fluid in the reservoir probably doesn't even ever make it down to the shock. In that case, then the remote hose would really be the component responsible for cooling - it's like a 'kegerator' where the surface area of the fluid volume is increased. This should reject heat quite efficiently, especially with the length required to get from the shock to under the pillion seat. I would think you'd get a ton more cooling from that than the actual reservoir location.
 

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Hello there,


thanks for the pictures; I am waiting arrival of my Wilbers, the same as you've fitted; I've got the bike nicely sorted, boosterplug to cure the hiccoughs, lust lowering kit so I can get my short legs back flat on earth, and now to remove the hidden poor cousin rear shock and replace it with something that doesn't fling me out of the seat everytime I hit one of the numerous bumps on our Australian country roads; I hope the money is worth it.
cheers


Steve
 

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Old thread. But Ohlins does now offer a shock. The shock does not have compression damping adjustment though. Only rebound.
 
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