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Discussion Starter #1
Hi. I also wanted to improve the rear silencer by replacing the zx10r,
https://www.ebay.com/itm/kawasaki-2016-2017-2018-ZX10R-ZX10-NEW-rear-suspension-unit-shock/382667007032?_trkparms=aid=111001&algo=REC.SEED&ao=1&asc=20160908105057&meid=1725d3e2378d40bdb7494796a5f259bd&pid=100675&rk=1&rkt=15&sd=382667007032&itm=382667007032&_trksid=p2481888.c100675.m4236&_trkparms=pageci:563d556c-111b-11e9-bfa0-74dbd18004c6|parentrq:1f5dde1a1680a9c1643276c7fff9bd1d|iid:1

but now I think that setting is probably quite difficult,
when the shock is behind the rear swinging fork.
Do you have any experience?
Ohlins is out of my options.

Thanks for the opinions.
Roman.
 

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A ZX10 shock will fit, to adjust settings would be possible but more awkward. try an Aprillia Tuono rear shock which is a close match on length and would be easier to adjust.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Maybe try again from R6 2013, which has a container built otherwise than the GSXR1000, where the battery cover has to be adjusted.
look at the picture, although it does not fit the perspective, but the view should be the difference in the location of the container.

and I do not know if we're going to get better at the Tuono shock absorber.
 

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Maybe try again from R6 2013, which has a container built otherwise than the GSXR1000, where the battery cover has to be adjusted.
look at the picture, although it does not fit the perspective, but the view should be the difference in the location of the container.

and I do not know if we're going to get better at the Tuono shock absorber.
Problem with that R6 shock is the bottom mount on the GSXS shock is male and female on the R6

The R6 shock may fit the GSX-S750 though

GSXS1000 Shock Bottom mount



GSXS1000 shock top mount

 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for responde.

It's my fault. I had to measure it. So I'm going to try the Kawasaki shock absorber and jack-up raiser kit, even though it's going to be wrong to set it up because the positioning of the adjusting elements is behind a swinging fork.
 

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Problem with that R6 shock is the bottom mount on the GSXS shock is male and female on the R6

The R6 shock may fit the GSX-S750 though

GSXS1000 Shock Bottom mount



GSXS1000 shock top mount

PhuketPaul, can i know what shock you use right now? By the way, i know if swap with zx10 shock we need to add jack up kit around 30mm. Can we use the shock extander to jack up so our bike with have the same seat high like before?

 

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I use a Ohlins TTX GP from a 2015 GSXR 1000. Not a straightforward install but not too difficult. The details are in my website.
If all the dimensions match up i don't see why the shock extender wouldn't work

Phuketpaul, can i know the length for GSXS1000 standard shock from eyes to eyes. Thank you.
 

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To install the ZX10R shock, you will need two modifications :

1. The lower shock mount is 39mm vs 36mm on the GSXS1000 stock shock. So either machine the ZX10R shock lower mount/bushing to 36mm or add 1.5mm washers to the GSXS1000 suspension link and swingarm mount to compensate for it.
2. The ZX10R shock is shorter than the GSXS1000 by about 20mm. This will need custom link plates made of either 5mm or 6mm Stainless Steel or Aluminium to keep the stock height.

I have a ZX10R shock sitting in my garage, waiting for the above two tasks.
 

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To install the ZX10R shock, you will need two modifications :

1. The lower shock mount is 39mm vs 36mm on the GSXS1000 stock shock. So either machine the ZX10R shock lower mount/bushing to 36mm or add 1.5mm washers to the GSXS1000 suspension link and swingarm mount to compensate for it.
2. The ZX10R shock is shorter than the GSXS1000 by about 20mm. This will need custom link plates made of either 5mm or 6mm Stainless Steel or Aluminium to keep the stock height.

I have a ZX10R shock sitting in my garage, waiting for the above two tasks.
Dont forget to take the comparison picture for the zx10 shock and step by step installation from start to end. :):):)
 

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So far, I have designed the new extended shock link by measuring the stock link and the required rise to account for the shorter ZX10R shock. Can be seen here :*******removed link of wrong design*******

I will 3d print one link today test the fitting and also determine that there are no bindings on full shock compression/extension. Once it looks good, I am getting it machined from a shop using the same file. Will keep this thread posted on the results.
 

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Looks like I got some of the measurements wrong, the 3d printed prototype did not work. I have have corrected the design now, keeping the first prototype as reference and am confident the next one will be fine. Here is the corrected design : https://autode.sk/2EofIz0

I will again print this out tomorrow and test fit it confirm the final design.
 

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So far, I have designed the new extended shock link by measuring the stock link and the required rise to account for the shorter ZX10R shock. Can be seen here :*******removed link of wrong design*******

I will 3d print one link today test the fitting and also determine that there are no bindings on full shock compression/extension. Once it looks good, I am getting it machined from a shop using the same file. Will keep this thread posted on the results.
Just be aware, I was chatting to someone on another forum and they lowered their bike just 20mm by using different links.

simply changing the links has changed the geometry of the bike so much that the rear end is much softer, even with full preload on the shock he gets 50mm sag.

I think extending the length of the shock is the better way to go if possible
 

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Just be aware, I was chatting to someone on another forum and they lowered their bike just 20mm by using different links.

simply changing the links has changed the geometry of the bike so much that the rear end is much softer, even with full preload on the shock he gets 50mm sag.

I think extending the length of the shock is the better way to go if possible
Thanks for the heads up, that is something I am testing as well. I want to see how the link rotates to see how it affects the leverage at the shock. Any change to stock links will change the leverage at the shock, so will changing the length of the shock or the angle at which the shock moves relative to the swing arm. In any case,I am modifying the stock form and it will need a some tweaking,so do not expect this to be a straight forward task.
 

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Just be aware, I was chatting to someone on another forum and they lowered their bike just 20mm by using different links.

simply changing the links has changed the geometry of the bike so much that the rear end is much softer, even with full preload on the shock he gets 50mm sag.

I think extending the length of the shock is the better way to go if possible
Your bang on there Paul, the GSX S rear linkage is set up as a rising rate linkage so altering the linkage will alter the rising rate either up or down. Shortening the links also risks bottoming out the shock travel.
 

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Custom link test results

After spending a whole day worth of time testing and retesting different links for the ZX10R shock, I found some rather difficult problems than just having an issue with leverage.

To begin with, ZX10R shock is bulky at the bottom - where the compression and rebound settings are. This is so wide that the shock will contact the inside of the swing arm by the time we reach the full stroke of the ZX10R shock - which is already less than the stock Shock stroke length.

Potential solution : There is one way we can avoid the contact - if we remove the stock exhaust and the mounting hardware, there is enough clearance to tilt the shock ahead so that it will work. Removing the stock exhaust also will provide enough space to lower the dogbone - which will further provide some more freedom to design the links.

Next, we have the issue of not bbeing able to reach the controls once the ZX10R shock has been installed.

Options : We can turn the shock so that the controls are on the right side instead of the left side. But this will need removal of the stock exhaust as the mounting points interferes more in this case. But this route provides easy access to compression/rebound damping controls - while preload adjustment is still out of reach.

Risky option:
Turn the shock upside down to have the controls on top. This will provide easy access to all the controls and none of the issues with clearance at the bottom. But this will need some work with the ZX10R shock and removal of the stock exhaust servo - as it contacts the bulky section of the ZX10R Shock. I dont know enough to say if this is right or wrong - but it feels like the Shock might not work well if it is oriented in the wrong direction.

Here is a picture of the stock vs ZX10R shock + links :



At this point, I need to rethink this approach as my intention was to make it a simple swap by changing the links, since this is not really the perfect fix. Maybe someone can chime in with any other option I might be overseeing here.I am open to building some prototypes to test it out.
 

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I’m watching to see how all this pans out, along with what Paul comes up with. I fitted a R1 shock but once again it’s not perfect. I could make it work better with cutting the rear subframe brace but I have no plans to cut up my new bike. As long as I have the shock set to the firmer side, which works well in the mountains, everything is good. If I soften it up for the ride there, I get contact with the swing arm and the piggyback unit over large bumps.
 
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