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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the reviews of the GT (this one, I think: Suzuki GSX-S1000GT (2021) - Review) mentioned the GT's rear tire size of 190/50. The author questioned why Suzuki didn't use the "taller" size of 190/55.

My question: What would the "taller" tire do for performance/handling, and would it affect anything if, at the next tire change, you replaced the 190/50 with a 190/55 tire? Would ABS or TC be impacted in any way, require a recalibration of the system software?

Author didn't mention the front tire, so assume that's optimal?
 

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The idea behind going to a 55 profile rear tire is you get an easier turn-in. If you search this forum, people did it with the last generation and some were pleased with the result. It should not affect abs/tc because the diameter difference is negligible. No one changes the front tire because 120/70/17 is the only size available for sport bikes of this size.

My personal opinion is, don't do it, if a 55 profile tire was better then suzuki would have used it instead of a 50. I also suspect there is some confirmation bias involved when people claim the 55 profile works better, their brains are subconsciously trying to justify their choice to themselves. But I haven't tried it myself so what do I know. Personally I never felt my 2016 had a difficult lean-in or needed any improvement, it felt perfect the way it was.
 

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The 190/50 is a slower turn in tire. They are also cheaper. I prefer the 190/55, way better handling tire. No effects what so ever on TC or ABS or any of that. Suzuki finally switched to the 190/55 tire starting in 2017 on the GSX-R1000s, finally!

Front tire is the standard 120/70/17

Soon as the cheap Dunlop that comes on the bike wears out I'll be switching to a higher quality set of tires with the 190/55. It causes no ill effects and Suzuki is only putting the ancient 190/50 tires on there to hit a price point. The 190/55 is way better in ever sense.

I went 190/55 on my 2016 and it completely changed the tip in and made the bike the way it should have come. The stock 190/50 tire was horrible for doing any turning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Great answers, and just what I needed. My feeling is that I'll switch both tires to Michelin Road 6 when tire change is needed. Curious whether the Michelin Road 6 "GT" tire would be more appropriate, or is the Suzuki not heavy enough to require the GT tire. Opinions? Thanks.
 

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I rode @JP_ 's GSXS back to back with mine - his handled a ton better - the main factor in this was the 55 profile rear v the 50 on mine. I've just put a 55 on the back of mine, and it undoubtedly turns in better, there isnt any confirmation bias, it's better - tips in so much easier.

So why did Suz put a 50 on? well as said cheaper (typically 2/3 price), but also to make the bike slower turning and ensure it doesnt have handling too close the GSXR.

A must-do mod once the rear is done.
 

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Great answers, and just what I needed. My feeling is that I'll switch both tires to Michelin Road 6 when tire change is needed. Curious whether the Michelin Road 6 "GT" tire would be more appropriate, or is the Suzuki not heavy enough to require the GT tire. Opinions? Thanks.
I ran the GT Pirelli Angels on my Concours 14 which is a much heavier bike than the GT Suzuki and I did not like them on the C14. Michelin Roads regulars worked better on the C14 back then. I will stick to regular non GT tires on the Suzuki just like I have done on my Yamaha Tracer 900 GT which is about 20 lbs lighter than the Suzuki will be.

Of course everyone's feel with tires is a personal thing so my opinion is just that my opinion and may not work for anyone else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think the regular Michelin would be fine...the GT tire sounds like it's for heavier bikes, although I had a set on my BMW F800GT (weight 470 lbs) and they were great.

Now, for those long trips over 500 miles that might see you needing to clean/lube your chain, has anyone got experience using the "Snapjack" (snapjack), since the Suzuki has no center stand and you obviously can't haul around your paddock stand from home...?
 

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I think the regular Michelin would be fine...the GT tire sounds like it's for heavier bikes, although I had a set on my BMW F800GT (weight 470 lbs) and they were great.

Now, for those long trips over 500 miles that might see you needing to clean/lube your chain, has anyone got experience using the "Snapjack" (snapjack), since the Suzuki has no center stand and you obviously can't haul around your paddock stand from home...?
I've got the chinese knock off of that snapjack Side Bike Stand Bike Portable Quick Stand Fit For Suzuki GSX-S1000 GSX-S1000F | eBay . I did make one [a bit of threaded bar and tube with a nut welded on], but wasnt 100% with it on anything but flat surfaces. The pop jack works a treat - when I do some touring itll help any rear wheel tweaks [i put a scottoiler on last week, so hope it won't be to do lubing].
 

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I just roll it forward and spray a section repeat. Modern oring chains do not require a lot of lube. The sealed grease on the pins is all they really need. The shiny roller in the middle can be quietened down with a little external lube if needed. I clean the exterior of my chains with WD40 sprayed on a rag then wipe down the exterior links of the chain removing the build up of lube which attracts dirt. I typically get 15-25k miles from a good quality oring chain. Another tip, do not run it tight and most bikes people tend to over tighten their chains because they do not under stand a chain gets tighter when the rider is on the bike verses when the bike is on the side stand. Loose chain is a happy chain actually. A chain on a modern street bike is not easily coming off. Running a chain to tight and you wear the pins out and the chain kinks up then its shot. Not to mention the countershaft sprocket main shaft bearing and seal. Chain maintenance is not what it once was back in the day with subpar quality chains. I prefer DID oring chains and always with a rivet master link.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It's the dirt that accumulates on the o-rings that causes abrasion and why I clean with a chain cleaner before lubing. Spraying lube on dirt seems like it'd be a questionable practice. I use Motul chain clean and a soft toothbrush, with microfiber rags to clean things up. I once used those Grunge brush things to clean my chain and they did an awesome job of wrecking the o-rings. So soft toothbrush and Motul, followed by Motul chain lube. With the "Snapjack", I should be able to do that while touring.

Not sure cleaning the exterior links does much for prolonging o-ring life, but it makes for a shiny chain! :)
 

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I think the regular Michelin would be fine...the GT tire sounds like it's for heavier bikes, although I had a set on my BMW F800GT (weight 470 lbs) and they were great.

Now, for those long trips over 500 miles that might see you needing to clean/lube your chain, has anyone got experience using the "Snapjack" (snapjack), since the Suzuki has no center stand and you obviously can't haul around your paddock stand from home...?
i made a shaped peice of wood to push under my swingarm pick up, and a smaller peice i use to keep the 'stick' from sinking into the ground
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
i made a shaped peice of wood to push under my swingarm pick up, and a smaller peice i use to keep the 'stick' from sinking into the ground
Like to see a photo of that. The thing that bothers me about these things is...I can just see something slip, and the next thing you know, you're under 500 pounds of bike while trying to do chain maintenance.
 

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I recently put Michelin road 6 190/55 rear and 120/70 front on my 2020 GSXS Katana. The bike came with Dunlop 190/50 sportmax 2 on it and rode like a dog, always twitching in corners and not a good feel. I understand that Suzuki go to the manufacturers and buy in bulk tyres that have been in their factories and put them on (cost saving) and as such the rear tyre got the 50 profile. This causes the bike to have a thicker center when riding in a straight line and less rubber in a turn. The 55 profile adds about 9mm in height but improves the handling out of sight. Like riding on rails. It has a smaller center in a straight line but more rubber contact in a turn. Feedback from the tyres is amazing.
 

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I ran the GT Pirelli Angels on my Concours 14 which is a much heavier bike than the GT Suzuki and I did not like them on the C14. Michelin Roads regulars worked better on the C14 back then. I will stick to regular non GT tires on the Suzuki just like I have done on my Yamaha Tracer 900 GT which is about 20 lbs lighter than the Suzuki will be.

Of course everyone's feel with tires is a personal thing so my opinion is just that my opinion and may not work for anyone else.
I also have run Pirelli Angel GT2 on both my BMW K1600GTL and R1200RT and loved them. No issues with the front wearing uneven like the road 5s with the front tyre scolloping. Manufacturers use the cheaper tyres to bring the price in at a given price to be able to make the bike more competitive on the price, another reason is no cruise control as standard on the GSX -s 1000 GT, saving more cost and bringing the bike into the market to compete with another brand. My tyres will be changed to the Angel GT2`s before the bike gets registered for goes through the P.D. and I will be changing my rear to a 55 profile
 
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