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Discussion Starter #1
can anyone give us a quick bit of advice on how to adjust it , i now there are threads here on how to do it but they are quite deep, my mate who just done his on his 675r is going to have a go but im a bit worried that he might make it worse as it isnt that bad but it does buck me a lot on rough roads,im quite a fat ******* at 16 stone lol thanks for any help and it is the f
 

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Don't worry about making it worse.
Just write down the settings you have now before you adjust anything and you can always go back to it.
You are a little Ahem! more solid than me so I would start by turning the rear preload adjuster up by one or two and see if the handling feels better.
If the nose is diving too much or bottoming out under heavy braking I would add another ring of preload on the front too, if is not bottoming out but diving too fast then add a little front compression
Other things to consider are, if the bike is pushing out and going wide powering out of corners you need to increase the front rebound.
Squatting from the rear powering out of corners is normally too much rear rebound, whilst your ass jumping out of the seat on every bump is not enough.
There are some good write ups on the web giving a much more detailed description but these are just a few of the most common basic things to start with.
I would suggest looking at one adjustment at a time and not trying to do them all together or it can get a bit confusing.
Main thing to remember is to take a note of each adjustment and what it does. This way you will move forward a lot quicker and find the feel you are looking for
Happy twiddling!:D
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Don't worry about making it worse.
Just write down the settings you have now before you adjust anything and you can always go back to it.
You are a little Ahem! more solid than me so I would start by turning the rear preload adjuster up by one or two and see if the handling feels better.
If the nose is diving too much or bottoming out under heavy braking I would add another ring of preload on the front too, if is not bottoming out but diving too fast then add a little front compression
Other things to consider are, if the bike is pushing out and going wide powering out of corners you need to increase the front rebound.
Squatting from the rear powering out of corners is normally too much rear rebound, whilst your ass jumping out of the seat on every bump is not enough.
There are some good write ups on the web giving a much more detailed description but these are just a few of the most common basic things to start with.
I would suggest looking at one adjustment at a time and not trying to do them all together or it can get a bit confusing.
Main thing to remember is to take a note of each adjustment and what it does. This way you will move forward a lot quicker and find the feel you are looking for
Happy twiddling!:D
cheers for that
 

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See where you are at before adjusting by turning the comp and rebound adjuster all they way in (turn clockwise), counting the clicks as you go. Factory settings are I believe 8 clicks out on both comp and rebound. I weigh 175-180 with gear on and I had to reduce spring preload in both the fork and shock. The shock is now on position 3, and the fork has 3 1/2 lines showing. These bikes a bit oversprung when new. The shock was trying to launch me out of the seat. A bit less preload and a smidge more rebound and it feels great now. The fork was also too stiff when new. A bit less preload and lss compression damping has the fork feeling good to. YMMV
 

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Here's a hint: Centre punch a dot or a permanent marker mark on everywhere relative to the bike frame, handle bar triple clamp before you move the adjustments from the Suzuki settings.
This makes it a lot easier to return to stock if you go in deep and get lost with your changes.
I have found on some bike forks that adjusting the preload, will also unintendedly turn the rebound through the adjuster shaft O ring binding a bit.


Rob.
 

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can anyone give us a quick bit of advice on how to adjust it , i now there are threads here on how to do it but they are quite deep, my mate who just done his on his 675r is going to have a go but im a bit worried that he might make it worse as it isnt that bad but it does buck me a lot on rough roads,im quite a fat ******* at 16 stone lol thanks for any help and it is the f
Hi as said record your start settings, I'm a similar weight and have now changed my rear shock for a nitron unit.
However, try these setting ...
Front: preload 2 rings showing
Rebound 6 clicks out from full in,
Compression 10 clicks out from fully in.
Rear shock: preload 2 more steps to compress the spring,
Rear comp/rebound 1.5 turns out from fully in.
Use these as a base setting . They will certainly improve things.
 

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Just a quick note..
The 2017 forks do not have click adjustment for front compression damping.
It is now set by the number of turns from fully in.
So now it's 2 turns out from fully in instead of 8 clicks out.
Cheers....
 

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I have my fork compression at 17 clicks out (I think max is 18), rebound at 9 out, and that really helped the harshness over bumps. Also, the shock was really jarring my back over sharp pavement buckles to the point if I saw it ahead of time I would lift up slightly off the seat. I increased preload on the spring from the 3rd perch to the 4th perch from soft, and backed the rebound off some more to two full turns out (or maybe 2.5, don't remember), and now it is much better over the sharp bumps. I wouldn't have thought it, but now I wonder if the suspension was bottoming over the sharp bumps. I haven't yet measured and adjusted sag, since I was wanting to get some break-in on the suspension parts and need to get my son to help. My weight is around 200 pounds with gear.
 
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Its interesting how Suzuki preset the rear shock on the F model at position 3, but pre-sets the naked firmer on position 4.
I'm sure there's a method to their madness, it just isn't apparent to most of us. Like 5ml difference in fork fluid between the two models...that's a teaspoon for us Mericans. Who could possibly tell a difference?
 
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the F and the naked have an other weight balance, the fairing from the F weights 5 kg or more, and by highspeed for example on "german autobahn" :)-)) you have more weight on the frontwheel caused from the aerodynamics ...
 

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Its interesting how Suzuki preset the rear shock on the F model at position 3, but pre-sets the naked firmer on position 4.
I also think it's weird but after changing my F from 3 to 4 and adjusting the rebound 1/2 a turn out I went back to 3 because at 4 it was a bit harsh on my bum... I am 180 pounds.
 

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So, really, when you adjust the rear shock to a "higher" setting, unless it's a progressive spring, it really isn't making the spring firmer. It's just lifting the bike, as long as the spring is within it's top out and bottom out limits, why would that make the spring firmer? It is changing sag, and it changes the geometry of the rear suspension, which will change the firmness in a way that might be counter-intuitive. Please check out this thread and the posts by JohnCW.
 

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Its interesting how Suzuki preset the rear shock on the F model at position 3, but pre-sets the naked firmer on position 4.
As has been discussed many times on this forum, changing the preload does not make the spring firmer.

In this case i'm pretty sure that the difference is because the F has 1) slightly more weight at the front 2) has downforce of about 20Kg on the front at high speed and so they choose slightly less preload on the rear to keep the bike more level and to avoid changing the geometry too much at speed which would make the bike less stable as the forks compress
 

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I also think it's weird but after changing my F from 3 to 4 and adjusting the rebound 1/2 a turn out I went back to 3 because at 4 it was a bit harsh on my bum... I am 180 pounds.
The most likely explanation .....

Your relatively light weight at 82 Kg. At this weight a pre-load setting of 4 may have resulted in inadequate rider sag. This would cause the bike to top out excessively through dips and potholes.

The top out plate in most shocks is nothing other than a large solid metal plate on the end of the shaft that smacks into the end of the shock body only cushioned by a thin firm rubber washer. It's a pretty brutal stop.

When you reduced the pre-load to 3 you lowered the suspension in its travel, reducing the tendency to 'top out'. Set your rider sag by measuring it, it should be around 35-40mm. At a pre-load setting of 4, for your relatively light weight is was probably less than this range.
 

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As has been discussed many times on this forum, changing the preload does not make the spring firmer.

In this case i'm pretty sure that the difference is because the F has 1) slightly more weight at the front 2) has downforce of about 20Kg on the front at high speed and so they choose slightly less preload on the rear to keep the bike more level and to avoid changing the geometry too much at speed which would make the bike less stable as the forks compress
if it does not make it firmer then why does it feel more harsh or stiff the higher you go up on the settings...it can be felt by all who ever played with there settings....its just a play of words....lets not be silly here....going from 1 to 5 you can feel the pressure it takes to jump each ramp it gets harder the closer you get to 5,,.....it may of been discussed many times yes.. 100 will say there bike get stiffer and ride harsher the higher you go...2 say its not true it dont change a thing.....if 5 takes out most or all of the free sag then the spring is stiffer......applying more force up.....
 

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if it does not make it firmer then why does it feel more harsh or stiff the higher you go up on the settings...it can be felt by all who ever played with there settings....its just a play of words....lets not be silly here....going from 1 to 5 you can feel the pressure it takes to jump each ramp it gets harder the closer you get to 5,,.....it may of been discussed many times yes.. 100 will say there bike get stiffer and ride harsher the higher you go...2 say its not true it dont change a thing.....if 5 takes out most or all of the free sag then the spring is stiffer......applying more force up.....
I agree with one of your points, that to increase the preload on the spring takes more force than the previous setting took on the rear shock (Not on the forks, which are better designed springs), but I think this is because the shock is set up with very little preload and so when you adjust the preload you are actually just compressing the extreme ends of the spring where the spring is thinner and thus weaker. The maximum preload you can add on the stock shock is 6mm and as you get towards the 6mm of extra preload you are adding you are now starting to compress the main spring thus needing more force.

However when you sit on the bike you are only in the linear part of the spring and so have a constant spring rate regardless of the preload (although the geometry of the swing-arm linkages increases the effective spring rate as you get towards the end of the travel)



You can see from this animation, that with a linear spring, after any amount of realistic preload is added, force to distance compressed is contant
 

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if it does not make it firmer then why does it feel more harsh or stiff the higher you go up on the settings...it can be felt by all who ever played with there settings....its just a play of words....lets not be silly here....going from 1 to 5 you can feel the pressure it takes to jump each ramp it gets harder the closer you get to 5,,.....it may of been discussed many times yes.. 100 will say there bike get stiffer and ride harsher the higher you go...2 say its not true it dont change a thing.....if 5 takes out most or all of the free sag then the spring is stiffer......applying more force up.....
In every post on the subject I've stated that the only time increasing preload increases spring tension is when the suspension is fully extended. That's exactly what you are doing most of the time when you crank up the pre-load ramps up with no one on the bike. You are indeed compressing the spring and making it stiffer ...... with no one sitting on the bike the suspension is fully topped out.

Get someone to sit on the bike. Then test the pressure it takes to move up each of the ramps. For all practical purposes it will be identical. And the reason is because the spring length (and pressure) won't change. If each ramp say represents 5mm movement, then each will just push the bike up 5mm. The spring length and tension will remain unchanged. It cannot change because it will ALWAYS be equal to the load of weight and rider it is supporting. It will always be than length and tension, because the load the compressed spring is supporting hasn't changed.

Trying to say you can pre-load a spring of say 120 kg force (or 90kg) to sit under a load of 100 kg (bike and rider) resting on it is defying the laws or mechanics and physics. The spring will always compress or expand till it equals the weight (bike and rider) bearing down on it. That's just what springs DO. It will always be exerting 100 Kg regardless of how much, or how little, pre-load it initially had. The only difference pre-load makes is how MUCH the spring had to compress to get to 100 Kg. And on a motorcycle that equates to ride height.

Yes, you can get 100 riders to say their ride changes when they alter preload. But ask them to explain the mechanics of why, and I guarantee not one can give a solid mechanical explanation of why this happens. And the reason they can't, is because there isn't any. Just take note of informed suspension experts like Paul Thede from Race Tech. Changing preload does not change spring tension (other than when the suspension is fully topped out). All it alters is ride height.

And ride height does affect the effective spring rate at the wheel, balance of weight carried front/back, and whether or not the suspension will be prone to bottoming or topping out. The only way to make a spring harder or softer is to physically change springs.

P.S. The most plausible explanation of why you feel a softer ride with the arse of your bike sitting way down on a preload setting of 1 is because by giving it the geometry of a 1960's Easy Rider 'chopper' you've lightened the weight on the front wheel.
 
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