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Anyone else ever wanted to have a nice sit down heart to heart with the engineers that designed the GSX-S?

The devil is in the details as they say, and the details with the GSX-S are craptastic. I never thought I would miss doing maintenance on my Ducati 996, but it was WAY easier than doing anything on this bike. Why in the world would they put a bolt on the INSIDE of the swing arm to attach the chain guard? The fairing removal is legendary. (yes I have the F)

I love the ride and idea of this bike, and have no plans to get rid of it, but I also have no desire to get another Suzuki down the road if this is common place with them.
 

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Other than removing the plastics. I find the GSXS/F fairly simple to work on. I also like that the electronics and sensors are "basic" when compared to some of the other bike's I've owned (US model). If a sensor or electronic part breaks, I'm not forced to have a new one "re-programmed" or "paired" to the ECU like on my other bikes. Honestly, I've owned a bunch of full fairing bikes over the years; none of them have been easy to remove the plastics from. My Kawasaki required the removal of 3 fairing panels just to replace the battery...
 

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I would have to agree with Oregon - the bike is not that hard to work on; and most components are fairly easy to replace

I have had the fairing on my f (all panels) off several times; and once I figured out the how to - I can remove everything in 15 minutes +/-. The more you do it, the easier it gets.
 

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......and very often the manufacturing people, and bean counters, get their inputs in what is the most efficient, less expensive, fastest way of putting anything together, against what the engineers, may want. They have to try to build it with good quality, but to a price, or we would not be able to afford them at all.

.......for instance I would like have exposed screws in all plastic panels, motorcycle or automobiles, instead of invisible fasteners, and engineers would agree, yet the realities of mass producing at a price would dictate; it would be too expensive and too slow.

I work a lot on vehicles and motorcycles I have owned, and there is not a single one I have not said..."I would have built this like this, or like that, what the $%#* were they thinking??"
 

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......and very often the manufacturing people, and bean counters, get their inputs in what is the most efficient, less expensive, fastest way of putting anything together, against what the engineers, may want. They have to try to build it with good quality, but to a price, or we would not be able to afford them at all.

.......for instance I would like have exposedscrews in all plastic panels, motorcycle or automobiles, instead of invisible fasteners, and engineers would agree, yet the realities of mass producing at a price would dictate; it would be too expensive and too slow.

I work a lot on vehicles and motorcycles I have owned, and there is not a single one I have not said..."I would have built this like this, or like that, what the $%#* were they thinking??"
Besides cost, plastic fasteners offer several distinct advantages over screws when securing body panels and other non structural components on vehicles. They allow for expansion, tolerence and flex much better than rigid screws and bolts. Also, they reduce the overall weight of the bike. I like rigid fasteners, but each fastener type has its purpose.
 

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All things considered, it's pretty ingenious the way the plastics come off without cracking and breaking to smithereens.

Velcro, plastic pushpins, and a few small bolts...whoda thunkit?
 

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Anyone else ever wanted to have a nice sit down heart to heart with the engineers that designed the GSX-S?

The devil is in the details as they say, and the details with the GSX-S are craptastic. I never thought I would miss doing maintenance on my Ducati 996, but it was WAY easier than doing anything on this bike. Why in the world would they put a bolt on the INSIDE of the swing arm to attach the chain guard? The fairing removal is legendary. (yes I have the F)

I love the ride and idea of this bike, and have no plans to get rid of it, but I also have no desire to get another Suzuki down the road if this is common place with them.
I have a love-hate relationship with my F. The plastics are indeed hard to deal with.
 

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I had a heck of a time deciding between the naked and the F. I drove the salesman crazy haha. He had already given me the price I wanted on an F, but when I got there I really like the naked too. I really could not make up my mind it was ridiculous. In the end, I decided my original intent was a naked, not a faired bike, but what clinched the deal was knowing the maintenance would be a little easier on the naked.

I do agree on the chain guard bolt. You should not have to remove the tire to remove a chain guard or hugger.

Other than that though, its pretty easy to work on. I already done my plugs and even removed and re-installed my injectors (had them cleaned). Nothing is really that difficult so far. Its also a Suzuki, which brings us back to the original idea of talking with their engineers. I'd like to thank them for making bikes that provide performance and reliability....and some of the best gear boxes in the business....for prices that most folks can afford.

I'd also like to tell them to stop screwing around and put a wider ratio gear set in the GSX-S line more appropriate for a street bike!!!
 

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Suzuki? No. Honda auto engineers? Yes. Most specifically when my wife's battery terminal broke off and she parked in the darkest corner of the parking lot and called me to come help. To remove the battery, in the dark, I had to use a wrench on a nut that was 6 inches down a piece of threaded rod that was partially corroded and the Honda engineer only left me room to turn the wrench 1/16th of a turn.

Longest

Battery

Replacement

Ever.
 

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Suzuki? No. Honda auto engineers? Yes. Most specifically when my wife's battery terminal broke off and she parked in the darkest corner of the parking lot and called me to come help. To remove the battery, in the dark, I had to use a wrench on a nut that was 6 inches down a piece of threaded rod that was partially corroded and the Honda engineer only left me room to turn the wrench 1/16th of a turn.

Longest

Battery

Replacement

Ever.
I've found Honda go out of their way to place one nut in a blind place. If something is held on with 4 nuts, 3 will be looking at you, the last one will need something else removed, but that one will also need etc etc etc.
To change the front wheel on a Honda, start think about the rear number plate bracket - you'll sooner or later need to remove that too to get that front wheel off down all to the one hidden nut.
Honda has a worldwide patent on it for every product they make. That's why Honda got so rich early on - hourly workshop rates.

Rob.
 

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The gearbox ratIo is fine as long as you go one tooth bigger on the counter shaft sprocket. It has clearly the smoothest gearbox I have ever owned. Truly a thing of beauty.
 

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... thank them for making bikes that provide performance and reliability...
You know I've been on several motorcycle forums over the years and I have yet to hear on this forum of a single issue/problem with the bike that points to reliability in the few months I've been a member anyway.

That's a big reason I went Suzuki/Japanese this go around. I don't want to worry about being stranded somewhere and I've got confidence with this bike there.
 

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You know I've been on several motorcycle forums over the years and I have yet to hear on this forum of a single issue/problem with the bike that points to reliability in the few months I've been a member anyway.



That's a big reason I went Suzuki/Japanese this go around. I don't want to worry about being stranded somewhere and I've got confidence with this bike there.


Yep!
Three years on this month and all I’ve done is ride it. It’s had the required service at the right time, other than that it’s been miles, tires and smiles


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I agree. Seems most of the issues we hear about are caused by mods or service not going as planned. Have yet to hear of a single inherent mechanical or structural problem on our model.
 

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Yep!
Three years on this month and all I’ve done is ride it. It’s had the required service at the right time, other than that it’s been miles, tires and smiles


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


Whoops! Should have said four years. I guess my bike is more reliable than my memory

There’s something to be said about a lack of modifications that’s for sure. The main thing is to do them properly and not take any short cuts. Mine are all practical ones, suspension, heated grips, power outlets for sat nav(GPS) and usb,fender extenders front and rear and a rather ugly luggage rack.
So far all good


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I bought a Ford Fusion Sport, and joined the owners forum just to get more good info than the normal sites. Found out I own a total piece of crap that has more issues than any motorcycle I've ever owned (Japanese). I wish I hadn't bought it and I don't go there any more unless I need to deal with an issue. Too depressing.
 
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