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I allways fill it with 98 octane .We also have 95 octane, but I think the 98 will give a better power outcome with lower fuel consumption. The difference in price doesn'nt bother me for that. I don't use any additives

I don't have any troubles with the 'snatchy' throttle

I'm from Belgium
 

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95 for me me too here in the Czech Republic, I don't really think it matters these days plus 95 was good enough for my GSXR.

If I had something like the new Kawasaki H2 I might consider 98 just to keep that supercharger whirring away.

Just saying ; - )
 

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Haven't tried the 98 yet but I've always given my other bikes a drop of the good stuff for a treat every now and again. Normally I just use the 95 for day to day use. I'll be interested to see what the difference is with the GSX :)
 

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Always use 98 octane as I did with my fireblade.
 
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I use 98, unless I really need fuel and the servo doesn't have it.
 

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91, it is the highest offered in my location.
 

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I know some countries have different ratings, i can't remember exactly but im sure there are three. Ron mon and some other one. I think 95 in Australia is similar to 89 in America.

I also consistently use bp 98
 

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I know some countries have different ratings, i can't remember exactly but im sure there are three. Ron mon and some other one. I think 95 in Australia is similar to 89 in America.

I also consistently use bp 98
This interested me so as it's raining outside I decided to do a quick search. Good old Wiki came up with the best explanation as to why we are all using different numbers around the world.

"Anti-Knock Index (AKI) or (R+M)/2[edit]
In most countries, including Australia, New Zealand and all of those in Europe,[citation needed] the "headline" octane rating shown on the pump is the RON, but in Canada, the United States, Brazil, and some other countries, the headline number is the average of the RON and the MON, called the Anti-Knock Index (AKI), and often written on pumps as (R+M)/2). It may also sometimes be called the Posted Octane Number (PON).

Difference between RON, MON, and AKI[edit]
Because of the 8 to 12 octane number difference between RON and MON noted above, the AKI shown in Canada and the United States is 4 to 6 octane numbers lower than elsewhere in the world for the same fuel. This difference between RON and MON is known as the fuel's Sensitivity,[4] and is not typically published for those countries that use the Anti-Knock Index labelling system."

Another interesting point ,I haven't copied, is some manufacturers change their fuel dependant on time of year or altitude so they have a more consistent burn across a wider range of variables:nerd:
 

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The only vehicle i noticed this on was on my old Mitsi Evo IV (Japanese Grey import). If you put RON 95 fuel in it the thing sounded like it was miss firing on one cylinder, which i believed was called 'pinking' sp. The only reason i would ever put 95 instead of 97/98 RON is because it was still in the days Super Unleaded wasnt available everywhere like it is now in the UK. I know in the owners club some people (idiots) used to get the newer Evo's remapped for 95 when fuel was at silly prices.

Im not sure about bike though ECU's are great and complex things so it may be Suzuki has a self learning ECU with fuel and air mixtures to take in different parts of the world or whether they are a set map with an expectation of certain fueling conditions.

Heres what the manual says

FUEL, ENGINE OIL AND COOLANT RECOMMENDATIONS
FUEL OCTANE RATING Use premium unleaded gasoline with an octane rating of 95 or higher (Research method). Unleaded gasoline can extend spark plug life and exhaust components life.
(Canada) Your motorcycle requires premium unleaded gasoline whenever possible, with a minimum pump octane rating of 90 ((R+M)/2 method). In some areas, the only fuels that are available are oxygenated fuels.
NOTE: • The GSX-S1000/A/F/FA engine is designed to use premium unleaded gasoline only. Use premium unleaded gasoline under all riding conditions. • If the engine develops some trouble like lack of acceleration or insufficient power, the cause may be due to the fuel the motorcycle uses. In such case, try changing the gas station to another. If the situation is not improved by changing, consult your Suzuki dealer.
OXYGENATED FUEL RECOMMENDATION (Canada, EU) Oxygenated fuels which meet the minimum octane requirement and the requirements described below may be used in your motorcycle without jeopardizing the New Vehicle Limited Warranty or the Emission Control System Warranty.
NOTE: Oxygenated fuels are fuels which contain oxygen carrying additives such as MTBE or alcohol.
Gasoline Containing MTBE Unleaded gasoline containing MTBE (Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether) may be used in your motorcycle if the MTBE content is not greater than 15%. This oxygenated fuel does not contain alcohol.
Gasoline/Ethanol Blends Blends of unleaded gasoline and ethanol (grain alcohol), also known as “GASOHOL”, may be used in your motorcycle if the ethanol content is not greater than 10%.
Gasoline/Methanol Blends Fuels containing 5% or less methanol (wood alcohol) may be suitable for use in your motorcycle if they contain co-solvents and corrosion inhibitors.
3-3
DO NOT USE fuels containing more than 5% methanol under any circumstances. Fuel system damage or motorcycle performance problems resulting from the use of such fuels are not the responsibility of Suzuki and may not be covered under the New Vehicle Limited Warranty or the Emission Control System Warranty.
NOTE: • To help minimize air pollution, Suzuki recommends that you use oxygenated fuels. • Be sure that any oxygenated fuel you use has recommended octane ratings. • If you are not satisfied with the drivability of your motorcycle when you are using an oxygenated fuel, or if engine pinging is experienced, substitute another brand as there are differences between brands.
 

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Just to add to that we all know some of the supermarket type petrol station sell cheaper petrol/gas because they have more additives in but theres isnt ever going to be a way to tell.

Maybe the snatchy throttle people have could be down to using one of these type of fuel stops. Its seems an issue Suzuki can quite put their finger on so it may be some other factor including the rider i suppose :p
 

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Normally i use 98 here in the Netherlands, we can buy some 102 as well.
My Yamaha WR450F supermotard runs better on that.
 

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It makes me laugh when I read these posts. The idea is to use the lowest RON fuel your bike is designed to run on. Running a higher octane fuel (eg: 98, when 95 will do) will not give you more power, better fuel economy, or any other benefit, other than costing you more $.
 

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It makes me laugh when I read these posts. The idea is to use the lowest RON fuel your bike is designed to run on. Running a higher octane fuel (eg: 98, when 95 will do) will not give you more power, better fuel economy, or any other benefit, other than costing you more $.

The truth in your pocket...
So, no difference with higher octane?
keep on smiling if you think so:|
 

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It makes me laugh when I read these posts. The idea is to use the lowest RON fuel your bike is designed to run on. Running a higher octane fuel (eg: 98, when 95 will do) will not give you more power, better fuel economy, or any other benefit, other than costing you more $.
The truth in your pocket...
So, no difference with higher octane?
keep on smiling if you think so:|
Aha, here we go......
>:D
 

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The truth in your pocket...
So, no difference with higher octane?
keep on smiling if you think so:|
Again, running an octane rating higher than which the manufacturer recommends will do nothing for you (unless you've modded the engine, and are running higher compression, etc.). The article below explains it reasonably well.

MYTH BUSTING: High Octane fuel will make a car faster - motoring.com.au

My old SV runs wonderfully on standard unleaded, and nothing else I put in it has ever made me think I should be spending more. When I bought a new GSX1400 back in 2007, I had a couple of dyno sessions (because I fitted a different exhaust and PCIII and wanted a custom map built). At the time, the tuner hadn't played with a GSX14 before, so he asked if he could do a couple of extra runs (at no charge) and test some things. One of the tests he did was to drain my fuel system and replace it with premium unleaded (I think 95 was the highest we could get at the time). If I can find the charts (somewhere at home on CD-ROM) I'll upload them, but the runs were absolutely identical. I'm not saying that the GSX-S won't run better on 95 or higher (yes, I'll try it myself) but the point I'm making is that the engine needs to be built to take advantage of the octane rating, so buying more expensive fuel will not necessarily give you a better result.

I'm keen to hear other people's experience with this specific bike.
 

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I use 98. In my bandit sacs I usually use 95


I think there is a few difference in the price and the motor will work better
 

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i have read so many articles about this . Universally they agree , THERE IS NO BENEFIT in using a higher octane fuel than the manufacturer recommends . But if it makes you feel good to make oil companies rich , go to the airport and buy avgas , which is a fancy name for kerosene.
 
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