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Well done! How's the end result ride?
 
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Hi Gixxis 1k
I'd bet you were happier to see it all back together, it's a lot of work to pull out a shock. Some bikes are easier than other's.

The GSX-S750 was easy to get out; the 1000 with the exhaust cannister under the shocky makes it more difficult a job.
I am not sure that the jack was that safe. Tell me what is to stop the timber from crushing/cracking the plastic underbody or slipping out ?

I've done risky things too, but that method looks like if it goes wrong, a person could lose an arm or have the bike fall on them.
When I did the 750 to try out different spring tensions, as well as the swing arm stand I used a combination of a screw jack under the motor, another one under the pipe chassis member that braces the swingarm, and put the side stand on a 250 mm concrete block.

The pipe chassis side jack had a piece of suitable hardwood 50 x 25 mm placed vertically from the pipe the jack head, on which a 6 mm steel plate was placed.
The front wheel was also chocked as when the rear of a bike is jacked up, the bike does roll forwards.
This method gives more places of support. The jacking upwards allows some timber packing to be added as required under the side stand as it quite flexible when the weight is off it.
Eventually, the paddock stand can be removed and the wheel levered up with a short piece of timber with a fulcrum box or brick under it.

IF you want a bike that's difficult, just pick a Honda, any Honda.

Rob.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi Gixxis 1k
I'd bet you were happier to see it all back together, it's a lot of work to pull out a shock. Some bikes are easier than other's.

The GSX-S750 was easy to get out; the 1000 with the exhaust cannister under the shocky makes it more difficult a job.
I am not sure that the jack was that safe. Tell me what is to stop the timber from crushing/cracking the plastic underbody or slipping out
This is not a difficult task , I work as a maintenance engineer & electrician Entertaining tasks like this is easy (everything is subject to the physical laws around us).

My bike has had the muffler / silencer / turkey tray removed so exhaust was irrelevant here

As for safety , My arm would not go in had the jack been wobbling around (it's against a rubber warm rubber tyre so friction exists) & obviously you need to evaluate the material you use between the jack & the bike.

It's common sense ; had I had the money I would get an ABBA Stand, but I'm now in need of new tyres & the 1st big 7500mile service which is 1300miles overdue
 

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Discussion Starter #7
IF you want a bike that's difficult, just pick a Honda, any Honda.

Rob.
I (& many others) would state that Hondas of all bikes are the easiest to work on.
For the Japanese bikes Kawasaki is a pain in the arse for me. Yamaha , Honda & Suzuki are much easier.

Imagine having to work on a BMW , everything you touch involves disconnecting something which could short circuit something else , KTMs are heading down that route with all the electrical wizardry they're employing at present.

If you really want to get your hands dirty get any of the beautiful Italian machines , look stunning, perform incredibly & are totally temperamental & unreliable.

I've worked with a few people who own such machines & they end up (quite wealthy ; upper management bosses) with 2 bikes because of this reason.

MV Augusta (nicest looking modern machines in my opinion)
Ducati
Aprilia

so problematic
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well done! How's the end result ride?
Absolutely transformational , I've increased the preload by about ⅓ more as I like it to be as stiff as possible while maintaining sag.

I also increased the rebound by 5clicks and its a truly wonderful upgrade.

- The cornering is heightened its so light (it was light & agile anyway) but I now find the fork springs too soft (knew this anyway but further highlighted by the rear shock) I'm 1 click out on the tension / rebound out of 12 🤦‍♂️ so I'm definitely putting in some stiffer springs.

- I no longer need to brace myself for some of the outrageous bumps we have on the road

- Acceleration is very comfortable (it was never an issue as the stock setup can work fine if setup correctly for the rider)

definitely excited & inspired to

  • upgrade fork springs
  • galfer wave rotors & Speigler Steel brake lines (Really not comfortable with the brakes , they're not terrible but mine needs more bite)
What a great write up with photos too, well done.
Thanks , there's another write up by someone with everything you need but you have to be able to suspend the bike from above or use an ABBA Stand.

I have neither (ABBA Stand is essential really for things I'd like to do) so I thought I'd share for folk in a similar scenario

Hi fitted the same one on my bike very happy
Absolutely ; I watched a video with a guy talking about suspension & brakes & he said until you experience something of High quality you haven't got a clue about the experience your missing out on ; I concur totally.

Excellent upgrade ; any Bike I purchase from now on will receive
  • tyre
  • suspension ,
  • brake line,
  • air filter ,
  • lithium battery
  • heated grips
before I'd always thought suspension was overrated 🤦‍♂️ how wrong I was
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Going to use this to install my Wilbers 641 ASAP. Great write up!
just make sure if your jacking up the rear from the tyre that it's secure , you'll be able to tell , trust me 😊
 
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